Forget the Fantasy Photo, Meet Phantacea’s creator/writer on Sunday, 18 June, in Vancouver

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be at the Creators Table on Sunday, 18 June 2017, selling and signing Phantacea Publications comics, graphic novels, novels and mini-novels. $8.00 admission

Poster for Biannual Comics Show, June 2019

Poster for Biannual Comics Show, June 2019

Biannual Comics Show, Croatian Hall, Vancouver: http://www.canadiancomics.net/

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Cathead Coming

Kind of nifty. Like the three eyes. Not so sure about the cat’s head, though there is a Cathead in the Phantacea Mythos, hence why it’s on pHantaBlog.

Goes by the Illuminary given name of Cathune Bubastis. She’s the Apocalyptic of Drought and, yes, she does have three eyes. She’s also the brood sister of Pyrame Silverstar and the devil child Tralalorn, who might actually be a self-determinedly never-aging demon child.

Based on an Egyptian Goddess from the second millennia BC, if not earlier, Drought  has a linchpin role in “The Forgotten Fiend”. (Hit here if you’ve forgotten who he is,) Or does she? Hmm …

Fiend’s a story sequence originally written to lead into “The War of the Apocalyptics“.
It’s one of the three now interlinked ‘preludes’ or extended vignettes that conspired to form “Hidden Headgames”. In its case that’s mostly because it got tired hunkering down inside PHANTACEA computers with nowhere else to go since the early 90s.

BTW, the other two sequences are “Pyrame’s Progress” and “Acquiring Nihila”. The latter’s titular character appeared throughout “Goddess Gambit“. Plus, somewhat less pivotally, showed up ‘bigly’ in “Helios on the Moon“.

The titular character in the former mainly features in “Feeling Theocidal“, where Tralalorn also struts her stuff. And her Chimera.  Pyrame also has fairly significant roles in both “The Death’s Head Hellion” and “Contagion Collectors“.

Headgames is coming in late Spring, early Summer 2017 from Phantacea Publications.

Not sure how well this will work if you’re not also on Facebook, but hit the play button and see for yourself. If it doesn’t click into psychedelic action immediately, the ‘https’ link beneath image should get you to the ‘woo’ animation.

 

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Catastrophic Comedy Break

Headless man with headless monkey walk into a room, unaccredited comic panel taken from Facebook

Unattributed comic book panel taken from Facebook feed in late 2016

The above, unaccredited panel from a comic book showed up recently on a Facebook feed. Reminded instantly of this sequence from “The War of the Apocalyptics“.

Here Nakba Ramazar, the headless Apocalyptic of Sudden Disaster, is speaking to his cousin, Dand Tariqartha, Devalord of Subcranial Temporis. It’s early Tantalar 5980 (December 1980):

Ramazar pulled a flip pad out of the breast pocket of his highwayman-style overcoat. He also pulled out a pair of spectacles. After a second’s hesitation he returned the glasses to his pocket.
“Don’t know why I keep those things around.” he mumbled, flipping open the notebook. “Haven’t got a nose to perch them on nor the eyes to see through, have I?”
“So it would appear, yet you speak and have no mouth. How do manage that?”
“Promise not tell anyone, Dand the Dandy Deadbeat Dad, and I’ll let you in on our scintilla of a secret.”
“Upon my inviolable oath as a highborn son of Lazareme, mightiest of the Great Gods.”
“Two-be-headed Vultyrie’s a ventriloquist.”
“And here I thought she was just a mindless schlemiel.”
“That too.”

Sundown and Raven's Head confront Ramazar and the Vultyrie in Temporis

Artwork from pH-5, 1980, by Vince Marchesano

His fellow devils call Ramazar Catastrophe. Shown here with the Vultyrie fighting Blind Sundown and Raven’s head in a blog-familiar sequence from Phantacea 5, artwork by Vince Marchesano, 1990, he often comes up with some good lines.

In this scrap of dialogue, also from War-Pox, he’s back in the Sedon’s Sphere and railing against his fate to said sphere’s Sedon:

“It’s not fair, grandfather. Nobody told me I’d be up against cathonitizers. All I wanted was for things to get back to normal; create the occasional disaster whenever I grew low on ammunition; go to parties; make more azuras and the occasional deviant when I feel up to it; basically just have some fun.
“But, no, Murder had to have her unspeakable children and I had to protect her. Now here I am back in your dumb, depressing Dome again. I tell you, it’s just not right.”
“Don ’t fret so, Disaster. You might cause a meteor shower. Wait a mini-minute ! I’ve just had a thought.”
“Better than having a baby, I suppose.”
“Tell you what, come spring maybe we will have a party. Just for you. Shooting stars, how ’s that for a theme? Play your cards right and you might have the distinction of being the first one shot.”
“I’d rather be on the firing squad, if you don’t mind.”

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Top of the Solstice Season, Saturnalia Salutations and/or Merry Mithramas

 Happy Xmas from deities born on or around December 25!

(Introductory Note: Xmas may come from the Greek letter X, pronounced Chi, as in the first letters of Christ. However, in the Phantacea Mythos, it comes from Xuthros Hor, the Biblical Noah. Who, on account of the Noh Theatre, looks Japanese on the cover of “Forever & 40 Days — the Genesis of Phantacea”, a graphic novel that came out in 1990.)

Got this graphic off the web after it appeared somewhere on Facebook.

Image of coins containing heads of 16 gods taken from Web.

Sixteen “mythological” gods who celebrated their birthday around the Winter Solstice

Quite a lot of these fellows (no goddesses on list), or variations thereof, appear during the course of the Phantacea Mythos.

Photo by Jim McPherson, taken in Sintra Portugal in 2008

The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, as shot by Jim McPherson, 2008, within the chapel of the highly recommended Quinta da Regaleira (where it’s called “The Flaming Triangle” for some reason) in Sintra Portugal

For example …

  1. The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, shows up a bunch of places on the main website. Here’s one (http://www.phantacea.com/MasDevs1.htm#PyrRow); here’s another (http://www.phantacea.com/postTheo.html).
  2. Tammuz and Osiraq are the names of the Idiot or Atomic Twins who figure so devastatingly in end-game of “The Death’s Head Hellion” mini-novel (http://www.phantacea.com/pre1000.html#1idjits).
  3. Arguably, given Phantacea has always been ‘Anheroic Fantasy’, Chrysaor Attis is the central protagonist (http://www.phantacea.info/summer07.htm#AttisDescribed) in “Feeling Theocidal“. 
  4. His Great God of a devic half-father, Thyrgragos Varuna Mithras (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#ThryagMith), might be considered the novel’s main antagonist. Phantacea‘s Mithras even mocks Zoroastrian tradition here (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#SpermAcrack).
  5. Tvasitar Smithmonger is considered the devic Prometheus. He lives in the huge, as well as hugely impressive, cyclopean structure known as the Prometheum. Also as per  “The Death’s Head Hellion“, it stands atop the cliffs overlooking the molten Brainrock, lava lake in the caldera of Sedon’s Peak (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1tavy).
  6. Finally, for now, Lazareme’s female messenger is known as Irisiel Mercherm (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1speedy); her last name being half Hermes.
E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008

E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Additionally seems to me Adonis was mentioned during the course of ‘Feel Theo’ as one of Attis’s aspects during the 500-year era of the Goddess Culture on the Outer Earth (ca 2000 – 1500 BC).

Certainly Krishna’s girlfriend Lakshmi, even if she wasn’t nominally considered that in ancient times due to the prevalence of avatars, contributed her name to a surviving leader of D-Brig’s boo-hiss meter in the aftermath of “The War of the Apocalyptics“.

While on the topic of goddesses, Dionysus’s mother was Semele, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, variations of whom appear in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline.

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

His Cretan consort contributed her name to a character,  Ariadne Atreides, who appeared during ‘The Volsung Variations‘ web-serials of the early 2000s on pH-Webworld.

Further to this and Point 2 above, being Master Devas, Tammuz and Osiraq weren’t just twins. They were two of three. Their triplet came to be called Novadev.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

As per Feeling Theocidal, he was atomized (cathonitized, become a star in the night’s sky above the Hidden Headworld) circa 1500 BC. Did so while drinking with Phantacea  versions of that Cadmus (called Kadmon) and that Harmonia (the incomparable Harmony Unity).

Just in case you missed it in “Helios on the Moon“, or way back in 1977’s Phantacea One, Colonel Avatar Sol exploded near the moon. Miracle Memory (at least partially based on that Harmony) tells Heliosophos (who may have been that Kadmon in his second lifetime) that Sol was possessed of that Novadev.

One of the first postings on pHantaBlog was entitled “Make that Merry Mithramas“. If you need any more lynx on any of the above try the search engine atop most of the pages throughout www.phantacea.com.

Oh, yes, one of the subplots in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline has to do with efforts by the aforementioned Pyrame (Providence) Silverstar seeking to entice her forever lover, the Moloch Sedon — none other than the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky that was featured on the wraparound cover reprinted immediately below — into undoing the damage done by the Idiot Twins as per the aforementioned mini-novel “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

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“Infantilize”, “infantilized” and “infantilizing” are words, apparently

How do I know that? From the National Post, Canada’s argument against freedom of the press. See, to put its title succintly: “Infantilized” nature of genre fiction

I looked up “infantilize” on the Free Dictionary and got this:

in·fan·til·ize

(ĭn′fən-tl-īz′, ĭn-făn′-)

tr.v. in·fan·til·ized, in·fan·til·iz·ing, in·fan·til·iz·es

1. To treat or condescend to as if still a young child: The Victorian physician infantilized his patient” (Judith Moore).
2. To reduce to an infantile state or condition: “It creates a crisis that infantilizes them—causes grown men to squabble like kids about trivial things” (New Yorker).

in·fan′til·i·za′tion (-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
Logo reads Phantacea Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated

Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated – Phantacea logo

The article that inspired such simply scintillating research is actually, if awkwardly, entitled:

Simon Pegg is right, geeky genre fiction usually IS childish, even when it’s also something more

While I’ll admit to having heard his name before, I’d have to resort to Google to find out what movies Pegg’s appeared in. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of the article’s author, Daniel Kaszor, though.

However, a couple of his lines struck me as apropos considering some past pHantaBlog posts, notably here, here and here.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst", the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

One that stuck out, since it seems to apply directly to the National Post’s living saint, the Tar Party’s Chief Blue Nasty, is as follows:

“… in the superhero genre … characters are very explicitly given almost god-like powers. It’s a very simple fantasy to want to just be able to punch the world better.”
Which isn’t to say the article’s about Canada’s current and, sadly, stunningly long-serving Prime Minister. It’s (nominally) about the fantasy genre, if not explicitly the grimdark aspect of it.
covers for Damnation Brigade graphic novel

Front and back covers for the upcoming Damnation Brigade graphic novel; artwork by Ian Bateson, 2012; touch-up by Chris Chuckry, 2012; prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

And that derives almost entirely from the celebrity celery pandered to by today’s mainstream media, genre television, video games and society’s seemingly resultant need for instant gratification to go along with a severely reduced attention span.

Here’s the Pegg quote that tops the article:
“I’m very much a self-confessed fan of science-fiction and genre cinema. But part of me looks at society as it is now and thinks we’ve been infantilized by our own taste.” — Simon Pegg
And here’s the writer’s gravy atop the article’s meat and potatoes:

“… more modern fans of genre fiction want to read … “realistic” heroes through a childish mindset.

“And that’s part of what Simon Pegg was griping about — even when presented in an adult manner, genre has a way of being pre-chewed and regurgitated back in such a way that renders much of the nuance moot — signifiers such as brutal violence and grey morals reinterpreted as being cool instead of troubling — making the end product even more childish than the sanitized basic version.”

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

Which echoes Point #4 in the pre-Mithramas Mistletoe Miscellanea posting, the reference being to two of the Gun Porn TV shows made in Vancouver that have since been renewed:

“As to using arrows as implements of torture, using arrows for anything except killing and target practise, there are such things as arteries. Pierce a Captain Boomerang where Arrow hit him, evidently just because he deserved it, and, sorry Flash, it’s not a joking matter.”

So, go to any of the lynx highlighted in blue above and spend some quiet, unhurried, but satisfying time having a read or re-read.

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Just don’t doubt for a minute that Jim McPherson is above infantilizing his characters, if hopefully not his readers:

In the midst of the mad, the dead, and the dying squatted Mars Bellona. His mentality reduced to that of a low-grade simpleton, the presumption of immortality manifestly did not preclude the onset of insanity. The once tremendously powerful Apocalyptic was playing toy samurai with an even more demented Lord Tornado.
“So sorry, Bellona‑sama. I killed your man first.”
“Seppuku-fie yourself, Tornado-san. I killed you before you killed me.”

… from “The War of the Apocalyptics“, 2009

Welcoming portal for pH-Webworld as of Spring 2015

Entry port for pH-Webworld, first appeared in the 2015 Spring update

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Helios on the Moon Press Release

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster prepared to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes covers from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

PRESS RELEASE                                                   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jim McPherson’s long term project to novelize the Phantacea comic book series culminates with “Helios on the Moon”

VANCOUVER, BC: “Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, doesn’t just pick up where its predecessors, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons”, left off. It fills in the blanks they left behind, then blazes onto its own startling conclusion of Phantacea Phase One.

A multi-character extravaganza that’s cosmic in scope, yet very much earth-centric, it takes off with the Cosmic Express on the Thirtieth of November 1980, veers to the far-off planetary Utopia of Weir then, finally, rages back to both sides of the Whole Earth ten days and many lost lives later.

This is the rest of the stunning storyline only touched on during the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels: “The Damnation Brigade” and “Cataclysm Catalyst”. With a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, Book Three of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic trilogy, this is the rest of the story as it happens on the Moon, beyond and, indeed, below it.

And if you think Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos is only going through a phase, you’re right. But what a fantastic phase it is.

For more information contact:

Phantacea Publications
74689 Kitsilano RPO, 2768 West Broadway, Vancouver BC, V6K 4P4
Primary website: http://www.phantacea.com

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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No Lunatic Preamble This

At long last moving into publication mode for “Helios on the Moon”. Here’s its Auctorial Preamble, with some lynx and a couple of new graphics:

Helios on the Moon

Ad for the last two novels in the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Black and white version of an ad for the concluding books in the Launch 1980 story cycle from Phantacea Publications

– Auctorial Preamble –
********

Thus ends Phantacea Phase One.

So I intended to write on the inside front cover of Phantacea Seven in 1981. Except, it never got finished. I next reckoned on writing it about a decade later when Phantacea Phase One #15 came out. Except, this time, that project never got beyond the #1 stage; not in print anyhow.

Phase One #2, along with a number of background stories, were ready for press; as were the scripts and reprint art for a good deal of the rest. While most of these last did make it into one or another of the graphic novels subsequently released by Phantacea Publications, pre-orders didn’t warrant continuing the Phantacea Mythos at that time; especially not in that form. (Artists aren’t just temperamental, they’re costly.)

Let me repeat: ‘Thus ends Phantacea Phase One’. Sounds good, after all these years, but “Helios on the Moon” does much more than that.

It also ends the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, my personal project to novelize the PHANTACEA comic book series. Plus, for those who felt the ending of the last trilogy, ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’, as presented in “Goddess Gambit”, was not absolutely clear as to whether anyone survived – or anyone not explicitly done away with already didn’t – that will be sorted starting about nine chapters, or ‘moons’, from now.

3 comic book covers incorporated in ad for Phantacea Publications

Covers for pH-2 (Gordon Parker), pH-3 (Richard Sandoval), and 4-Ever&40 (Ian Fry, Ian Bateson), all of which figure in “Helios on the Moon”

Not surprisingly Ninth Moon shares commonality with “The War of the Apocalyptics”, the first book in the Launch trilogy, in that it begins winding down the stirring saga of the Damnation Brigade and their erstwhile companion in supra-doings, Kid Ringo, nowadays Ringleader.

As for the Family Thanatos and their never-remembered guest, the fiendish, always smiling fellow who speaks in bold-italics, they show up three moons prior to D-Brig et al. Of course non-devic characters didn’t just precede non-devic characters literally, in terms of literature, they preceded them chronologically.

Witness “Feeling Theocidal” and “The Thousand Days of Disbelief”, which were set in the Cathonic Dome’s Fifth and mid-Sixth Millennium respectively. Or “Forever & 40 Days”, which featured a series of graphic story snippets set before there was a Dome, let alone a Genesea necessitating one.

The previous book in this trilogy, “Nuclear Dragons”, divided into four parts. ‘Indescribable Defiance’ began it with the launching of the Cosmic Express. We saw what happened to one of its cosmicars in War-Pox, and to the cosmicompanions aboard it in Gambit. We’re about to begin finding out what becomes of one occupant of the control hub, one of the other cosmicars and the seven cosmicompanions occupying it.

Nuke’s aforementioned first part additionally brought our attention to the highly disconcerting matter of a perceived menace on the Moon, something also alluded to during War-Pox, and what governments and top dog corporations were doing about it.

For starters, they set up the United Nations SPACE Council (‘Society for the Prevention of Alien Control of Earth’) and appointed the by now 80-year old Great Man, Loxus Abraham Ryne, to run it.

He thereupon had built, and launched, the United Nations of Earth Spaceship (UNES) Liberty. Not long before Hel-Moon gets (over more so than) underway, it boldly blasted out there in order to deal with said menace, be it alien or otherwise. (Go with the otherwise.)

In terms of the titular pair who provided ‘Indescribable Defiance’ with its sectional sub-heading, did you know the Space Shuttle Columbia took off secretly in December 1980, months prior to its official inaugural flight? Returned safely as well. You do now. You’re also not too many moons away from finding out whom it was transporting towards the Liberty, which is already in lunar-synchronous orbit.

Nuke’s second section, ‘The Strife Virus’, focused our attention on, among others, a pair of (very) long lasting, inveterate nasties, Daemonicus and Strife. Both first appeared, or at least were mentioned, in Feel Theo, the initial book of the ‘Glories’ trilogy. To say the least it seems they’re extremely difficult to deal with permanently.

Until, that is, in terms of her anyhow … well, that would be telling too much for a preamble. That said, while preambles may be no place for telling all that’s to come, I would be remiss if I didn’t at least remind you of All, capitalized.

Nuke readers will recall the Phantom Freighter, whence Crystallion and Hell’s Horsemen, whence also Sharkczar. And what have they got to do with Incain’s She-Sphinx you might ask. Once again I refer you to Feel Theo, as well as “Janna Fangfingers” and Gambit. Ginny the Gynosphinx is no Andy the Androsphinx. She moves. And when she does, be smart. Stay out of her way.

Speaking yet again of Feel Theo, the time-tumbling Dual Entities featured in a number of its story snippets, if perhaps not explicitly so in its underlying narrative, the one-day saga of Thrygragon (Mithramas, Year of the Dome 4376) as told from a number of different viewpoints. As foreshadowed during the course of ‘The Strife Virus’, they do much more than feature in this book; hence its title.

In some respects remarkably, Nuke’s final two subsections, ‘Supra Survival’ and ‘Sinking and Swimming’, did leave a few tales left to tell. One who won’t be telling them is the deviant Legendarian, Jordan ‘Q for Quill’ Tethys. (The legendary 30-Year Man, aka 30-Beers, came as close as anyone in the Phantacea Mythos comes to being a protagonist throughout the ‘Glories’ trilogy.)

Collage and covers indicative of action recounted in "Nuclear Dragons"

Mr No Name collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014; pH-7 cover, incomplete, by Ian Bateson, 1980; pHz1 #1 cover, the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky by Ian Bateson, 1985

Gambit readers may recall that, for a change, Jordy’s latest lifetime did not seem to be in jeopardy once the moment of its moderately cliff-dangling dénouement arrived. Indeed, they probably assumed that either he or the improbably enormous, ever-fishifying Fisherwoman had saved everyone worth saving.

That was certainly one of the impressions left. Another was that the subheading for Gambit’s final third, ‘Endgame-Gambit’, meant endgame everyone. When it comes to the Phantacea Mythos, it’s always dangerous to make assumptions. That’s why it’s Anheroic Fantasy (anheroic = without heroes).

I do feel fairly confident in leaving you with one almost certainly accurate assumption, however: Every ending begets a new beginning. And a correction to my opening statement.

Thus begins the ending to Phantacea Phase One.

 

Jim McPherson
Creator/Writer
The PHANTACEA Mythos

 

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D-Brig gets five stars and an asterisk on Goodreads

Phantacea  Revisited 1:  The Damnation Brigade (Phantacea Revisited, #1)Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade by Jim McPherson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Damnation Brigade is the first Phantacea Revisited graphic novel.

The cover is by Ian Bateson, who also contributed a good percentage of the interior illustrations. Until now Ian’s Damnation Island sequence has never seen print.

Flyer for Phantacea books, 2012

Giveaway flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2012; artwork by Ian Bateson for Phantacea Phase 1 #1, 1986, derived from Dave Sim for Phantacea One, 1977

Of additional interest to aficionados of independent comic books, Dave Sim drew most of the Launching of the Cosmic Express sequence shortly before he began Cerebus the Aardvark in late ’77/early ’78.

Other featured illustrators include Gordon Parker, Verne Andrusiek (later Verne Andru), Carl Muecke, Vince Marchesano, Tim Hammell and George Freeman (Captain Canuck).

The book, whose dedicated webpage is here, begins with the launch sequence from Phantacea One (1977), as redone for Phantacea Phase One #1 (1987).

Flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2912

Giveaway flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2012; artwork by Ian Bateson for Phantacea Phase 1 #1, 1986, derived from Dave Sim for Phantacea One, 1977

It carries on with the titular struggles of an ultimately ill-named, 10-member band of supranormals from their re-embodiment on Damnation Island (the original version appeared in Phantacea Two, 1978), through their battles with the Byronic Nucleus, the Primary Apocalyptics and their allies, on both sides of the Whole Earth.

It ends with their inevitable reckoning as it first appeared in Phantacea Five (1980), which has been out-of-print since the very early 1980s.

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Jim McPherson adapted and expanded on the material presented in this ambitious graphic novel with 2009’s “The War of the Apocalyptics“, a full-length Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that commences the ‘Launch 1980’ epic trilogy.

Front and back cover mockups for "Helios on the Moon", prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

Mockup sent to potential cover illustrators for “Helios on the Moon”, the next scheduled Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel

It also includes parts of the Centauri Island and UNES Liberty storylines that  continue (“Nuclear Dragons“, 2013) and will conclude (“Helios on the Moon”, 2014) the latest blockbuster fantasy from Phantacea Publications.

Overall this a delightful complement to the ongoing Phantacea Mythos catalogue of novels, mini-novels, comics and graphic novels; highly recommended.

BTW, it gets an asterisk because Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, wrote the review.

View all my reviews

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Lower Prices for Van Expo 2014

Phantacea Publications price list specific for this year's Vancouver Fan Expo, 18-20 April 2014

Phantacea Publications price list specific for this year’s Vancouver Fan Expo, 18-20 April 2014

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be tending the Phantacea Publications table throughout this year’s Vancouver Fan Expo Easter Weekend (18-20 April 2014).

In addition to debuting “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst“, he’ll have with him all the usual suspects for sale, most of them at reduced prices.

See you there.

Black and white rendition of Kitty Clysm cover, art by Verne Andru, 2013

Bad Rhad’s at it again in this black and white rendition of the wraparound cover Black and white preview of cover intended for “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst”

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Two out of Three Recommendations ain’t awful

This just in from CM: CANADIAN REVIEW OF MATERIALS:

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

This review-recommendation written by Ronald Hore re “The War of the Apocalyptics”:

“The main difficulties I found were that … the story appears to take for granted some knowledge of what has gone on before. There are an almost bewildering number of characters who pop into the story without any background and constant references to past occurrences. There are also several named events or words used that form part of the narrative but do not immediately bring to mind what is being talked about. Much of the tale is told in the form of streams of dialogue between the characters. It might have helped somewhat to have a detailed character reference bio provided at the end along with a glossary of the more uncommon words and phrases.”

Might I humbly recommend use of the Phantacea-peculiar Search Engine atop either the Phantacea Publications webpage or pH-Webworld as a backup plan to even more pages in a novel? There are also lynx to Phantacea-peculiar Glossary items here.

========

This review-recommendation written by Ronald Hore re “The Damnation Brigade” graphic novel:

Covers for Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade

Graphic novel compiles the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from pH 1-5 as well as pHz1 #s 1 & 2; for more on the Phantacea comics hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo

    “The artwork is generally quite good. The problem lies with the details of the story being told.

     “The arc of the story covers the battle between various superhumans (supras or supranormals) known as the Damnation Brigade and devils described on the back cover as “originally extraterrestrial Shining Ones.” 

     “Perhaps because this graphic novel is a collection of comic book sequences from previously published works, the material we have here appears to be lacking in continuity and detail. It is very difficult to follow. The author obviously knows his story and the universe where it is set, in great depth, but the reader is faced with a number of characters and situations where the background appears to be lacking. This makes for a very slow read as you must pause to try and figure out what is going on and how it connects to what was read previously.”

And this is a recommendation? Yep.

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Front and Back Covers for "Nuclear Dragons"; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

Front and Back Covers for “Nuclear Dragons”; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

As for what he has to say about “Nuclear Dragons“, that’s here.

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