Bravura Makeup Worth Revisiting

Not about the Phantacea Revisited graphic novels (“The Damnation Brigade” & “Cataclysm Catalyst“) though they’re always worth revisiting. Once you purchase them of course.

No, this Vancouver talent is worth revisiting just to see again. Nifty work. Great photography.

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Long ago here, so no longer Coming Soon. Still like the graphic, though, so happy to revisit it too. Many more here, here and here

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

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That’s Europa Heliopolis, not the continent or Jupiter’s moon, at least not entirely

Graphic reads "Annuling Nihila", prepared by Jim McPherson

2012 composite graphic prepared by Jim McPherson utilizing artwork for Verne Andru and Pacheco, as spotted and shot in Merida ca 2010. Nihila will be reappearing in “Hidden Headgames” this year (2017)

Lower insert taken from pHantacea on pHacebook using the embed feature. Something of an announcement to note herein. More once “Hidden Headgames” gets nearer to its release date.

In the meantime have another graphic ==> and a different set of lynx connecting the one below.

Freespirit Nihila appears in the sequence promised below, which marks the return of Europa Heliopolis to the Phantacea Mythos after a fifteen to twenty year absence.

Hit here for a couple of mentions of Europa during the “Aspects of Amoebaman” web-serial and here for a 5980 spoiler that may or may not have made it to “Decimation Damnation“.

Something like it will certainly make it to “Hidden Headgames”, however.

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Orgasmatron — Bad Rhad’s Theme Song

Don’t know if Motorhead’s Lemmy (Ian Kilmister, 1945-2015) and band mates were writing about Bad Rhad when they wrote, and he sang, ‘Orgasmatron‘ for their 1986 album of the same name but one here-familiar writer reckoned he was: http://www.phantacea.info/summer05.htm#BadRhadWantsAll .

Phantacea Publications's photo.

“Orgasmatron”

I am the one, Orgasmatron, the outstretched grasping hand
My image is of agony, my servants rape the land
Obsequious and arrogant, clandestine and vain
Two thousand years of misery, of torture in my name
Hypocrisy made paramount, paranoia the law
My name is called religion, sadistic, sacred whore.

I twist the truth, I rule the world, my crown is called deceit
I am the emperor of lies, you grovel at my feet
I rob you and I slaughter you, your downfall is my gain
And still you play the sycophant and revel in you pain
And all my promises are lies, all my love is hate
I am the politician, and I decide your fate

I march before a martyred world, an army for the fight
I speak of great heroic days, of victory and might
I hold a banner drenched in blood, I urge you to be brave
I lead you to your destiny, I lead you to your grave
Your bones will build my palaces, your eyes will stud my crown
For I am Mars, the god of war, and I will cut you down.

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Bad Rhad was known as Rhadamanthys as well as Smiler during the initial PHANTACEA comic book series of the late Seventies, appearing on the cover for pH-6.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst", the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Nearly thirty-five years later, Verne Andru took his original and improved on it, in almost every respect, for the cover of “Cataclysm Catalyst.”

Bad Rhad appears as a pivotal character in “Feeling Theocidal” and “Goddess Gambit“. (Verne Andru did both of those covers as well.) Therein he’s often called the Judge but, as per here, doesn’t object when he’s equated with Ahriman.

A character called Bad Rhad actually shows up in Feel Theo. He’s a panpipes-playing ne’er-do-well whom George Tethys’s mother, Master Helena Somata, she of the ages’ old Weirdom of Kanin City (after Cain, Slayer of Abel), considers a bad influence on her precious son.
(If you have to know, Georgie’s the Emperor Constantine’s half-brother in the Phantacea Mythos. He’s also an incarnation of Jordan Tethys.)
However, since Smiler can’t be remembered unless he’s standing right in front of you and wills you to see him, who’s to say if that Bad Rhad and PHANTACEA‘s Rhadamanthys are one and the same. Well, a certain here-familiar writer might be able to tell you but he probably wouldn’t.
Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode; the Pharaoh’s head is actually a parking shot on Giza Plateau as shot by Egyptian air force circa 1929/30; Sedon’s Head by Jim McPherson and Tim Hammell, ca 1978

(Or, as far as that goes, Tomcat Tattletail during the three mini-novels comprising ‘The 1000 Days of Disbelief‘. Like Bad Rhad the panpipe player, Tomcat only has two standard human eyes. Devils are of course shape-shifters.)
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NOTE 1: The Cretan Rhadamanthys was a son of Europa and Zeus. Along with brother Minos he became a Judge of the Dead. As interesting as that may be, that isn’t why Smiler’s called the Judge. It’s because it rhymes with Druj (meaning ‘The Lie’ in Zoroastrianism.)

Demonic train cover for Motorhead Orgasmatrom 1986

Cover for 1986 album by Motorhead. No art credit given; taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Orgasmatron.jpg

NOTE 2: The third brother was named Sarpedon. The Sarpedon Underclass of Cabalarkon’s Weirdom played minor roles in “The Death’s Head Hellion“. As pure blood Utopians, the Summoning Child twins Demios, who’s black, and Melina Sarpedon, who’s white, are members of that selfsame underclass.

NOTE 3: A coyote character named Squirrelly Tethys smiles suspiciously throughout the D-Head mini-novel. Could be he’s the then latest stolen identity of the aforementioned Tomcat Tattletail, who plays on the incomparable Harmony’s heartstrings throughout ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic fantasy trilogy as released by Phantacea Publications from 2008-2010.
NOTE 4: Motorhead’s album was produced by Bill Laswell. Its front cover (above right)  features a demonic train. It’s only got two eyes, though, so probably not inspired by the never-remembered Smiling Fiend.
Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Top of the Solstice Season, Saturnalia Salutations and/or Merry Mithramas

 Happy Xmas from deities born on or around December 25!

(Introductory Note: Xmas may come from the Greek letter X, pronounced Chi, as in the first letters of Christ. However, in the Phantacea Mythos, it comes from Xuthros Hor, the Biblical Noah. Who, on account of the Noh Theatre, looks Japanese on the cover of “Forever & 40 Days — the Genesis of Phantacea”, a graphic novel that came out in 1990.)

Got this graphic off the web after it appeared somewhere on Facebook.

Image of coins containing heads of 16 gods taken from Web.

Sixteen “mythological” gods who celebrated their birthday around the Winter Solstice

Quite a lot of these fellows (no goddesses on list), or variations thereof, appear during the course of the Phantacea Mythos.

Photo by Jim McPherson, taken in Sintra Portugal in 2008

The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, as shot by Jim McPherson, 2008, within the chapel of the highly recommended Quinta da Regaleira (where it’s called “The Flaming Triangle” for some reason) in Sintra Portugal

For example …

  1. The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, shows up a bunch of places on the main website. Here’s one (http://www.phantacea.com/MasDevs1.htm#PyrRow); here’s another (http://www.phantacea.com/postTheo.html).
  2. Tammuz and Osiraq are the names of the Idiot or Atomic Twins who figure so devastatingly in end-game of “The Death’s Head Hellion” mini-novel (http://www.phantacea.com/pre1000.html#1idjits).
  3. Arguably, given Phantacea has always been ‘Anheroic Fantasy’, Chrysaor Attis is the central protagonist (http://www.phantacea.info/summer07.htm#AttisDescribed) in “Feeling Theocidal“. 
  4. His Great God of a devic half-father, Thyrgragos Varuna Mithras (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#ThryagMith), might be considered the novel’s main antagonist. Phantacea‘s Mithras even mocks Zoroastrian tradition here (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#SpermAcrack).
  5. Tvasitar Smithmonger is considered the devic Prometheus. He lives in the huge, as well as hugely impressive, cyclopean structure known as the Prometheum. Also as per  “The Death’s Head Hellion“, it stands atop the cliffs overlooking the molten Brainrock, lava lake in the caldera of Sedon’s Peak (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1tavy).
  6. Finally, for now, Lazareme’s female messenger is known as Irisiel Mercherm (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1speedy); her last name being half Hermes.
E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008

E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Additionally seems to me Adonis was mentioned during the course of ‘Feel Theo’ as one of Attis’s aspects during the 500-year era of the Goddess Culture on the Outer Earth (ca 2000 – 1500 BC).

Certainly Krishna’s girlfriend Lakshmi, even if she wasn’t nominally considered that in ancient times due to the prevalence of avatars, contributed her name to a surviving leader of D-Brig’s boo-hiss meter in the aftermath of “The War of the Apocalyptics“.

While on the topic of goddesses, Dionysus’s mother was Semele, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, variations of whom appear in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline.

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

His Cretan consort contributed her name to a character,  Ariadne Atreides, who appeared during ‘The Volsung Variations‘ web-serials of the early 2000s on pH-Webworld.

Further to this and Point 2 above, being Master Devas, Tammuz and Osiraq weren’t just twins. They were two of three. Their triplet came to be called Novadev.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

As per Feeling Theocidal, he was atomized (cathonitized, become a star in the night’s sky above the Hidden Headworld) circa 1500 BC. Did so while drinking with Phantacea  versions of that Cadmus (called Kadmon) and that Harmonia (the incomparable Harmony Unity).

Just in case you missed it in “Helios on the Moon“, or way back in 1977’s Phantacea One, Colonel Avatar Sol exploded near the moon. Miracle Memory (at least partially based on that Harmony) tells Heliosophos (who may have been that Kadmon in his second lifetime) that Sol was possessed of that Novadev.

One of the first postings on pHantaBlog was entitled “Make that Merry Mithramas“. If you need any more lynx on any of the above try the search engine atop most of the pages throughout www.phantacea.com.

Oh, yes, one of the subplots in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline has to do with efforts by the aforementioned Pyrame (Providence) Silverstar seeking to entice her forever lover, the Moloch Sedon — none other than the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky that was featured on the wraparound cover reprinted immediately below — into undoing the damage done by the Idiot Twins as per the aforementioned mini-novel “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

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Second Comings

Coming this Sunday, Jim McPherson returns to Heritage Hall for another Vancouver Comicon: http://www.vancouvercomiccon.com/

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

Coming this winter: “Helios on the Moon” finally gets digital. Watch for more here: http://www.phantacea.com/#greetings

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

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Meanwhile, on the Outer Earth of October 2015 — Harvesting Collectibles at a pHanta-pHall pHlea Market

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, 2014, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

The Vancouver Collectibles Fair happens tomorrow, Saturday, the 3rd of October 2015, at the Scottish Cultural Centre, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, shall be there under-manning, not undermining, the Phantacea Publications table. More here and here:

Scottish Cultural Centre
8886 Hudson Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Admission: $3.00

– Click here for directions to Scottish Cultural Centre –

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

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Aphant post salvaged from pHant on pHaceb — 11 Sept 2015

Photograph by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015Most people can readily conjure images inside their head – known as their mind’s eye. Now scientists have described a condition named aphantasia which leaves their brain unable to visualize. Sounds like a truly horrible, if nigh on impossible, condition. 

Ah, but what about aphantacea? That can be avoided by taking action either at last blue highlight or hitting here.

B/w covers of all the novels, mini-novels and graphic novels to date released by Phantacea Publications, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

B/w covers of all the novels, mini-novels and graphic novels to date released by Phantacea Publications

Photograph at top of page taken by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, more on the Serendipity and PHANTACEA webpage.
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SereNipHity Nihila

The colour side of a postcard Jim McPherson prepared in 2012 as a handout; artwork taken from cover of "Goddess Gambit"; artwork by Verne Andru

The colour side of a postcard Jim McPherson prepared in 2012 as a handout; artwork taken from cover of “Goddess Gambit”; artwork by Verne Andru

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, is seeing faces again. He’s not alone either. The folks behind Fortean Times are, too:. Except they cheat on the cover of FT 327: http://pics.gjovaag.com/FT/large/FT327.jpg

The Queen of England is secretly a lizard according to Fortean Times in 1999

Slightly altered cover from Fortean Times #129; more covers are here: http://www.theguardian.com/media/gallery/2013/nov/11/fortean-times-covers#img-7

Webmeister Oz has turned Borealis Brolly  (aka Auroral Nihila) into a background image whereas McPherson himself has contributed a new entry to the Serendipity page. It’s called sereNipHity (serendipity + Nihila + pHantacea + nifty).

The Serendipity entry is here: http://www.phantacea.info/seren.htm#iceNihil, whereas the background makes it first appearance here: http://www.phantacea.info/devils-described.htm#harmy. There’s even a new banner that should show up once in a while on pHantaBlog.

Photograph by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015

Photograph by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015

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“Infantilize”, “infantilized” and “infantilizing” are words, apparently

How do I know that? From the National Post, Canada’s argument against freedom of the press. See, to put its title succintly: “Infantilized” nature of genre fiction

I looked up “infantilize” on the Free Dictionary and got this:

in·fan·til·ize

(ĭn′fən-tl-īz′, ĭn-făn′-)

tr.v. in·fan·til·ized, in·fan·til·iz·ing, in·fan·til·iz·es

1. To treat or condescend to as if still a young child: The Victorian physician infantilized his patient” (Judith Moore).
2. To reduce to an infantile state or condition: “It creates a crisis that infantilizes them—causes grown men to squabble like kids about trivial things” (New Yorker).

in·fan′til·i·za′tion (-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
Logo reads Phantacea Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated

Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated – Phantacea logo

The article that inspired such simply scintillating research is actually, if awkwardly, entitled:

Simon Pegg is right, geeky genre fiction usually IS childish, even when it’s also something more

While I’ll admit to having heard his name before, I’d have to resort to Google to find out what movies Pegg’s appeared in. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of the article’s author, Daniel Kaszor, though.

However, a couple of his lines struck me as apropos considering some past pHantaBlog posts, notably here, here and here.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst", the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

One that stuck out, since it seems to apply directly to the National Post’s living saint, the Tar Party’s Chief Blue Nasty, is as follows:

“… in the superhero genre … characters are very explicitly given almost god-like powers. It’s a very simple fantasy to want to just be able to punch the world better.”
Which isn’t to say the article’s about Canada’s current and, sadly, stunningly long-serving Prime Minister. It’s (nominally) about the fantasy genre, if not explicitly the grimdark aspect of it.
covers for Damnation Brigade graphic novel

Front and back covers for the upcoming Damnation Brigade graphic novel; artwork by Ian Bateson, 2012; touch-up by Chris Chuckry, 2012; prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

And that derives almost entirely from the celebrity celery pandered to by today’s mainstream media, genre television, video games and society’s seemingly resultant need for instant gratification to go along with a severely reduced attention span.

Here’s the Pegg quote that tops the article:
“I’m very much a self-confessed fan of science-fiction and genre cinema. But part of me looks at society as it is now and thinks we’ve been infantilized by our own taste.” — Simon Pegg
And here’s the writer’s gravy atop the article’s meat and potatoes:

“… more modern fans of genre fiction want to read … “realistic” heroes through a childish mindset.

“And that’s part of what Simon Pegg was griping about — even when presented in an adult manner, genre has a way of being pre-chewed and regurgitated back in such a way that renders much of the nuance moot — signifiers such as brutal violence and grey morals reinterpreted as being cool instead of troubling — making the end product even more childish than the sanitized basic version.”

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

Which echoes Point #4 in the pre-Mithramas Mistletoe Miscellanea posting, the reference being to two of the Gun Porn TV shows made in Vancouver that have since been renewed:

“As to using arrows as implements of torture, using arrows for anything except killing and target practise, there are such things as arteries. Pierce a Captain Boomerang where Arrow hit him, evidently just because he deserved it, and, sorry Flash, it’s not a joking matter.”

So, go to any of the lynx highlighted in blue above and spend some quiet, unhurried, but satisfying time having a read or re-read.

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Just don’t doubt for a minute that Jim McPherson is above infantilizing his characters, if hopefully not his readers:

In the midst of the mad, the dead, and the dying squatted Mars Bellona. His mentality reduced to that of a low-grade simpleton, the presumption of immortality manifestly did not preclude the onset of insanity. The once tremendously powerful Apocalyptic was playing toy samurai with an even more demented Lord Tornado.
“So sorry, Bellona‑sama. I killed your man first.”
“Seppuku-fie yourself, Tornado-san. I killed you before you killed me.”

… from “The War of the Apocalyptics“, 2009

Welcoming portal for pH-Webworld as of Spring 2015

Entry port for pH-Webworld, first appeared in the 2015 Spring update

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Helios on the Moon comes down to Earth — again

Vancouver Comic Show promo for 7 June 2014

Jim McPherson will be attending the 4th show this Sunday, 7 June 2015

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be a guest at this Sunday’s VANCOUVER COMIC & TOY SHOW #4: http://canadiancomics.net/.

Being a guest has its privileges so he’ll also be manning a full table containing just about everything still available for purchase from Phantacea Publications.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

Some showy prices, too. $10.00 each for many of the full-length novels and all three graphic novels, $5.00 (bags included) for original comics from the 1970s (Phantacea 1-4 only), $5.00 for a couple of the mini-novels. Not to be beaten with a stick … or anything else, por favor.

It’s at Vancouver’s Croatian Cultural Centre, 16th and Commercial, from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. Admission is $5.00. Go to the Canadian comics site and scroll down for, surprise, surprise, an authorized shot of, um, the author.

In order to avoid offending the eye, and thus necessitating it having to be plucked out, it’s about the only photo he allows to be seen in public places besides the bottom of one of his sandals on his personal Facebook page.

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

Cover artwork for “Helios on the Moon” (the full-length, multiple character, mosaic novel that in effect marks the culmination of Phantacea Phase One) is by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014.

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

In the Launch 1980 promo, artwork from the cover of the graphic novel, “Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade“, is by Ian Bateson, 2012, whereas artwork from the latest graphic novel, “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst“, is by Verne Andru, 2014.

Jim McPherson prepared the graphic, the full version of which also features cover art from “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons” by Ian Bateson as well as a reiteration of the front cover art for “Helios on the Moon” by Ricardo Sandoval.

The graphic below was prepared by Jim McPherson from a photo he took of the Sun (Helios called Sophos the Wise) and Moon (Miracle Memory) kissing in 2012 in Puerto Morelos, Mexico. They’re two of the Cornerstone Characters in the Phantacea Mythos.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon-Kissing wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2012; taken to represent the time-tumbling Dual Entities during happy times

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