Best Yet Borealis Brolly

Have a quote (from 2014’s “Helios on the Moon“) and a shot of the best Borealis Brolly yet

Northern lights with distinctive umbrella shape; photo attributed to Tina Tormanen, taken from Web

From Tina Tormanen’s “Magical Photos

“There still wasn’t any Gypsium to do his G-string thing. Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

“She was up there all right. Was certainly no denying she was facially Fish, albeit with an extra eye and sporting more glitter in her wardrobe than even during the years she spent as Greater Godbad’s controversial queen (by marriage, not heredity). She’d somehow grown unheard of huge, bordering on ridiculously so. Those were definitely her feet to either side of Dustmound, though. Webbed toes gave that away. So the legs and all the rest of her towering above them had to be hers as well.”

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

Here’s a link to Tina Tormanen’s highly recommended “Magical Photos“. A photo force to be reckoned with, I reckon. Contains some spectacular shots.

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Evil Eye-Tems

Here’s a telling sequence from the first chapter of “Nuclear Dragons

It [Daemonicus] wasn’t in a coercive mood today. It was as furious as they were frightened.

“Nowhere in this world, nor in the other – nor in the next, be assured of that. I am a generous master yet unre­lenting in the pursuit of those who have wronged me. You will do exactly as instructed. There shall be no variations. No devi­ations. If you fear Hell coming to Earth, look no further than me.

“Eyefire-burn, Milo Mind!”

From the phantasm’s third eye came a burst of blazing fury. It engulfed Mind only briefly then dissipated. The major fell out of his chair and began to weep uncontrollably.

Longtime readers of stories featuring Jim McPherson’s PHANTACEA Mythos will recognize the speaker — though possibly not as Daemonicus. Which is how WORLD’s masterminds know him, as opposed to it. (For more on their fellow felon see here and here.)

Now consider these statements, from the Free Dictionary article on the Evil Eye (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Evil+eye):

The spreading in the belief of the evil eye towards the east is believed to have been propagated by the Empire of Alexander the Great.

In the Greco-Roman period a scientific explanation of the evil eye was common. Plutarch’s scientific explanation stated that the eyes were the chief, if not sole, source of the deadly rays that were supposed to spring up like poisoned darts from the inner recesses of a person possessing the evil eye (Quaest.Conv. 5.7.2-3=Mor.80F-81f). Plutarch treated the phenomenon of the evil eye as something seemingly inexplicable that is a source of wonder and cause of incredulity.

The phallic charm called fascinum in Latin (from the verb fascinare, “to cast a spell” — the origin of the English word “fascinate”), was used against the evil eye.

Sounds like Major Mind and the rest of WORLD’s brain trust should have exposed themselves instead of suffered the indignities Daemonicus foisted on them whenever he got pissed off.

Plutarch, in case you too were fascinated by the article, lived c. 46 – 120 AD. {Note: “KAI SU” means “and you (too)”.}

Here’s more on just how old belief in the Evil Eye. And what to do about it.

Roman-era mosaic from Antioch depicting a plethora of devices against the evil eye

Roman-era mosaic from Antioch depicting a plethora of devices against the evil eye, image taken from the Web

Additional apotropaic remedies for the Evil Eye:

The eye is pierced by a trident and sword, pecked by a raven, barked at by a dog and attacked by a centipede, scorpion, cat and a snake. A horned dwarf with a gigantic phallus crosses two sticks.

Curiously, especially for a guy for whom mythos matters, the various countermeasures described are highly reminiscent of elements found in Roman Mithraism. For example, consider the description of the Louvre’s tauroctony (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mithras_tauroctony_Louvre_Ma3441b.jpg).

It lacks a horned dwarf with a gigantic phallus but it does bring in two of Phantacea’s Cornerstone Characters, the Dual Entities. Plus, as per “Feeling Theocidal“, should mention that the bull-slayer is Chrysaor Attis, not his father Thrygragos Varuna Mithras.

Mithras slaying the bull in a cave, above which in the upper corners Sol (top left) and Luna (top right) emerge. Luna has a crescent behind her shoulders. Around Sol’s head is a crown of twelve rays, plus another that darts out in the direction of Mithras. Also in the upper left is a raven. The dog, serpent, scorpion are set at their standard positions.

 

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

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Tick-tock doc for DB’s TOC — Cover and Table of Contents listing all of Phantacea Revisited’s artistic contributors

Rather than type them out, I thought I’d just supply another PDF. Front cover on one side, TOC on reverse. Downloadable, too, though ask me nowhere near as interesting as Mythos Mag, which I’ve added to page just in case you missed it back in November.

For some reason the front cover half of the Tick-TOC Doc (as in document) would rather open with Acrobat than with a regular browser. Of course that might just be my regular browser.

D-Brig’s Cover & Interior Contributors

Mythos Mag 1996/2012

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The Disappearing Island — Could it be akin to Aegean Trigon?

As per here, according to the BBC online it has only recently been discovered that Sandy Island does not exist:

The supposedly sizeable strip of land, named Sandy Island on Google maps, was positioned midway between Australia and French-governed New Caledonia.

But when scientists from the University of Sydney went to the area, they found only the blue ocean of the Coral Sea.

The phantom island has featured in publications for at least a decade.

Until 1968 the tri-peaked Aegean Island of Trigon was shown on plenty of maps, too. Had been since roughly 1500 BCE. Click here for more on Aegean Trigon.

Note also: There’s a phantom freighter in “Nuclear Dragons”, a mini-novel due out in 2013 from Phantacea Publications.

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