Set your calendar for Van Con … after you set your clocks back

Comicon announcement for November 2016

Comicon announcement for November 2016

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, drags Dec-Dam (http://www.phantacea.com/#greetings) out of its boxes, no doubt kicking and screaming, in order to expose it for sale at the next Vancouver Comicon, 11-5 pm, Sunday 6 November 2016, at Heritage Hall in Vancouver (http://www.vancouvercomiccon.com/).

Final cover for print edition of "Decimation Damnation", collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2016

Final cover for print edition of “Decimation Damnation”

 

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Dragon’s can get eaten, too

And, as far as we know, Hiyati Samarand (the humanized form of Yati, Byron’s Dragon) is still being digested on Incain

Byron has a dragon. Last seen in Helios on the Moon (http://www.phantacea.com/hel-moon_mainpage.html) eating Sharkczar then getting swallowed whole by All of Incain, who featured predominantly in Feeling Theocidal (http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm) and showed up again in Contagion Collectors (http://www.phantacea.com/1000DazePage.htm#10SecondSyn)

Stories about dragons have always taken their inspiration from real-world animals. Does this mean dragons could feasibly exist?
bbc.com|By Josh Gabbatiss
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Phantacea Publications Some images of All can be found here (http://www.phantacea.info/term.htm#sphnxs1) and here (http://www.phantacea.info/sum14.htm#promoRow). She also appears on the cover of Helios on the Moon to Helios’s left. She’s how Freespirit Nihila escapes Sedon’s Head, howsoever temporarily. Will return as Wilderwitch’s Babies (http://www.phantacea.com/witchBabsPage.htm#logo) continues.

Phantacea Publications's photo.
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Current candidates for cover collage

Text reads: Jim McPherson Decimation Damnation

Jim McPherson’s Decimation Damnation, a mini-novel released by Phantacea Publications, 2016

Here’s a quote from the mini-novel. And no, it does not refer to Sally Dali’s Corpus Hypercubus, though a recent article on BBC Online re Dali in the Fourth Dimension did inspire today’s pHantaBlog entry

‘He must have looked like a crucified man, minus the cross, encased in a transparent beach ball floating in midair.’

Salvador Dali "Corpus Hypercubus" image taken from the Web

Dali’s painting of a white man dangling in the air in front of a cubic cross

========

Here’s an earlier quote:

‘Wilderwitch braved her best bluster. “Don’t waste any of your seemingly few and far between little grey cells on that, Sal. I’ve told you before, or if I haven’t, I’ll tell you now, Witch will do just fine. Who’s your sad excuse for a girlfriend – Murk Mist, Mad for Mud Magpies? She looks likes she could use some brightening up. And I know just the fellow to do that. Got a solar spear tailor-made for the job.”’

==>>Franz Stuck’s “Sin“, which I’ve seen in Munich’s worthwhile Neue Pinakothek, googles up when you type in “Lilith” so she must be a candidate.

Sin personified by Franz Stuck, image taken from Web;

Franz Stuck’s Sin has plenty of Lilith’s aspects, just not sure about the snake. Besides, already used in Phantacea Mythos to represent Sinistral Lust of Satanwyck

Painting spotted in Hamburg, shot by Jim McPherson, 2008

Edvard Munch’s Madonna has dark hair and very pale skin. Sort of eerie, could represent Primeval Lilith, Demon Queen of the Night

Too bad about the snake. Also too bad I already used Stuck’s Sin to represent Lady Lust, who doesn’t appear in the mini-novel except in unaccredited flashback.

<<== Here’s a shot taken in the Hamburg art gallery, ca 2008. Can’t remember who it’s by but she does have dark hair and very pale skin.(Turns out it’s Edvard Munch’s Madonna. Art gallery’s called Kunsthalle Hamburg.)

========

Finally, what about Wilderwitch’s fearsome soul self from even earlier in the mini-novel?

‘Which was when, desperation retaining consciousness, the Witch unleashed her fearsome soul-self. Sent it directly into the Master of Weir,  jolting him, Saladin Devason, off his feet. Ordinarily, for safety’s sake, she’d have already taken herself to a between-space Shelter and sunk into a trance. Didn’t have that luxury today.’

Charybdis image taken from Web

Nasty looking character called Charybdis. Taken from Web but no indication who it’s by or where it’s from.

Image entitled "Ghost Witch" taken from the Web

Image entitled “Ghost Witch” taken from the Web. Suggestive of Wilderwitch’s fearsome soul self.

How about this horror <<==? Probably couldn’t use it anyhow, since it’s likely copyrighted, but again, it suits the bill. (Called Charybdis but notes don’t tell who it’s by or where it came from.)

Or maybe this one ==>>. Character’s name is Skudakumooch and downloads as “Ghost Witch” so how could I resist.

(Shots taken from same webpage inspired a Serendipity entry entitled: “Shades of Shamanitoulin’s (Dead) Ignominies. Excerpts from the mini-novel have begun appearing on pH-Webworld)

Cover collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2005

Variation of a cover collage prepared for what’s now called “Decimation Damnation” ca 2005

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Did Camarena show Granny becoming a Phoenix in 1964/5

Not saying she does, but Sorciere’s quest to find a way to get Granny Garuda to phoenix leads directly to events recounted during ‘The Vampire Variations‘ web-serial that appeared on pH-Webworld in the Twenty Noughts (early Two Thousands).

It’s a storyline that Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, keeps threatening to revisit when he finally gets around to completing, as in completely revising, “Tsishah’s Twilight“. (Current reckoning has it as the third and final entry in the saga of “Wilderwtch’s Babies”.)

In this regard, he has discovered …

Jorge Gonzalez Camarena's Presence of Latin America, 1964–65, property of the University of Concepcion in Chile as taken from the Web

Jorge Gonzalez Camarena’s Presence of Latin America,1964–65, property of the University of Concepcion in Chile. One of its web-presences is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorge_Gonzalez_Camarena#/media/File:Mural_panoramico.JPG

Have a boo at the upper right hand corner of this mural (“Presence of Latin America”). Could that be Tsishah Twilight, who wears Sorciere’s daughter, the Shah Demon, as a way to keep them both semi sort of alive in 5980/1?

Could it be Sorciere herself, some fifteen years before her horrendous murder in June 1953? More importantly, is that really Granny Garuda phoenixing (to coin a word) at her side?

Of course not. Yet … it has to be, doesn’t it. Have a closer look and make up your own mind. Already have mine.

Camarena's non-commissioned rendition of Granny Garuda phoenixing in 1938

Jorge Gonzales Camarena did not receive a commission from Phantacea Publications for painting Granny Garuda phoenixing in 1965

As for what got McPherson researching Camarena, when he was in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Castle in January 2016 he not only spotted Camarena’s “Clash of Two Worlds”, he was allowed to take a picture of it.

Having already snapped impressive Camarenas in the opera house and the Archaeological Museum he decided to look online for some more, hence this serendipitous entry.

Camarena's Clash of Two Cultures, shot by Jim McPherson 2016

Camarena’s Clash of Two Cultures as shot by Jim McPherson in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Castle, 2016; web shots of same have been used on pH-Webworld for many years

BTW, the last time he was in the castle, fifteen years earlier or thereabouts, he was actually asked to leave for trying to take pictures inside it. Then again it might not have been a bonafide history museum then.

All of which explains why he had to appropriate a shot of it from the web to use on pH-Webworld here and here.

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode; the Pharaoh’s head is actually a parking shot on Giza Plateau as shot by Egyptian air force circa 1929/30; Sedon’s Head by Jim McPherson and Tim Hammell, ca 1978

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Does that make today Midwinter’s Eve?

Jim McPherson, the  creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, readily admits to being confused once in awhile. Not with aforesaid Phantacea Mythos, which he claims is perfectly straightforward, but with many vagaries of the modern world.

As he’s remarked frequently, and also in writing (most recently in Serendipity and …), he’s never quite understood why almost everyone seems to accept that winter begins on the solstice when, equally so, it’s traditionally known as Yule or Midwinter’s Day.

Wheel of the Year graphic taken from the Web

Wheel clearly shows the Summer Solstice is Midsummer’s Day, meaning the Winter Solstice (Yule) should be Midwinter’s Day

Unless it’s the Iliad, which starts ‘in media res’, in the middle of things, one doesn’t usually start much of anything on its middle day. To that end — albeit only mid-blog — here is something cribbed from his Facebook site (not to be confused with pHantacea on pHacebook) on the 19th of December 2015.

Today’s editorial in the [Vancouver] Sun didn’t exactly state that Monday doesn’t mark the first day of Winter but implies as much. In fact a letter to the Editor from Megan Schram dated 17 December makes clear the Solstice is more correctly thought of as Midwinter’s Day, Yule or only the fourth day of the eight day celebration of Saturnalia. Which in turn culminates on Mithramas, what only later became Christmas.

“Christmas is a tradition that has evolved over centuries. Roman Pagans introduced the holiday of Saturnalia, which was celebrated from December 17-25. Christianity tried to import Saturnalia to convert the Pagan masses. Because there was nothing Christian about it, they decided to name December 25 as Christ’s birthday and call it Christmas. Despite the takeover, Christmas continued to be celebrated with much food, drinking and hedonistic pleasure. Today’s customs of the tree, mistletoe, and exchanging gifts are Pagan in origin and were usurped by Christians …”

[Hit here and scroll down slightly for the complete letter to the editor as it appears online.]

The editorial referred to above is here. Have a couple of direct, howsoever florid, quotes that may or may not prove the point.

“In truth, the frosty boots of winter have been on the march toward Tuesday’s seasonal coronation for some time now …

“Yet if Tuesday’s solstice marks the official start of winter, it also marks the beginning of its unofficial end … In a scant six weeks or so, it will be spring that begins its march up the river valleys and mountain slopes, melting the cornices of blown snow that now adorn our glittering peaks.”

While that should settle that, it doesn’t because, you know, it’s just too damn complicated a re-think. Halloween is not the last day of Autumn. Imbolc Day (February the First or Second) is not the first day of Spring and Summer doesn’t start on Beltane (the beginning of May). Winter starts on the solstice, period, end entry.

As for today, if the time of the solstice is 11:48 EST tonight, which my calendar says it is, how can today be Midwinter’s Day? Might it not more correctly be considered Midwinter’s Night? Or, better yet, Midwinter’s Eve, making tomorrow Midwinter’s Day?

End rant. Until next year anyhow.

Business card for Phantacea Publications, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2008

Anheroic Fantasy since 1977

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Top of the Solstice Season, Saturnalia Salutations and/or Merry Mithramas

 Happy Xmas from deities born on or around December 25!

(Introductory Note: Xmas may come from the Greek letter X, pronounced Chi, as in the first letters of Christ. However, in the Phantacea Mythos, it comes from Xuthros Hor, the Biblical Noah. Who, on account of the Noh Theatre, looks Japanese on the cover of “Forever & 40 Days — the Genesis of Phantacea”, a graphic novel that came out in 1990.)

Got this graphic off the web after it appeared somewhere on Facebook.

Image of coins containing heads of 16 gods taken from Web.

Sixteen “mythological” gods who celebrated their birthday around the Winter Solstice

Quite a lot of these fellows (no goddesses on list), or variations thereof, appear during the course of the Phantacea Mythos.

Photo by Jim McPherson, taken in Sintra Portugal in 2008

The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, as shot by Jim McPherson, 2008, within the chapel of the highly recommended Quinta da Regaleira (where it’s called “The Flaming Triangle” for some reason) in Sintra Portugal

For example …

  1. The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, shows up a bunch of places on the main website. Here’s one (http://www.phantacea.com/MasDevs1.htm#PyrRow); here’s another (http://www.phantacea.com/postTheo.html).
  2. Tammuz and Osiraq are the names of the Idiot or Atomic Twins who figure so devastatingly in end-game of “The Death’s Head Hellion” mini-novel (http://www.phantacea.com/pre1000.html#1idjits).
  3. Arguably, given Phantacea has always been ‘Anheroic Fantasy’, Chrysaor Attis is the central protagonist (http://www.phantacea.info/summer07.htm#AttisDescribed) in “Feeling Theocidal“. 
  4. His Great God of a devic half-father, Thyrgragos Varuna Mithras (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#ThryagMith), might be considered the novel’s main antagonist. Phantacea‘s Mithras even mocks Zoroastrian tradition here (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#SpermAcrack).
  5. Tvasitar Smithmonger is considered the devic Prometheus. He lives in the huge, as well as hugely impressive, cyclopean structure known as the Prometheum. Also as per  “The Death’s Head Hellion“, it stands atop the cliffs overlooking the molten Brainrock, lava lake in the caldera of Sedon’s Peak (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1tavy).
  6. Finally, for now, Lazareme’s female messenger is known as Irisiel Mercherm (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1speedy); her last name being half Hermes.
E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008

E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Additionally seems to me Adonis was mentioned during the course of ‘Feel Theo’ as one of Attis’s aspects during the 500-year era of the Goddess Culture on the Outer Earth (ca 2000 – 1500 BC).

Certainly Krishna’s girlfriend Lakshmi, even if she wasn’t nominally considered that in ancient times due to the prevalence of avatars, contributed her name to a surviving leader of D-Brig’s boo-hiss meter in the aftermath of “The War of the Apocalyptics“.

While on the topic of goddesses, Dionysus’s mother was Semele, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, variations of whom appear in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline.

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

His Cretan consort contributed her name to a character,  Ariadne Atreides, who appeared during ‘The Volsung Variations‘ web-serials of the early 2000s on pH-Webworld.

Further to this and Point 2 above, being Master Devas, Tammuz and Osiraq weren’t just twins. They were two of three. Their triplet came to be called Novadev.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

As per Feeling Theocidal, he was atomized (cathonitized, become a star in the night’s sky above the Hidden Headworld) circa 1500 BC. Did so while drinking with Phantacea  versions of that Cadmus (called Kadmon) and that Harmonia (the incomparable Harmony Unity).

Just in case you missed it in “Helios on the Moon“, or way back in 1977’s Phantacea One, Colonel Avatar Sol exploded near the moon. Miracle Memory (at least partially based on that Harmony) tells Heliosophos (who may have been that Kadmon in his second lifetime) that Sol was possessed of that Novadev.

One of the first postings on pHantaBlog was entitled “Make that Merry Mithramas“. If you need any more lynx on any of the above try the search engine atop most of the pages throughout www.phantacea.com.

Oh, yes, one of the subplots in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline has to do with efforts by the aforementioned Pyrame (Providence) Silverstar seeking to entice her forever lover, the Moloch Sedon — none other than the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky that was featured on the wraparound cover reprinted immediately below — into undoing the damage done by the Idiot Twins as per the aforementioned mini-novel “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

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La Marseillaise is a woman, Mr Webmeister

Here’s a funny story, sort of.

After the events in Paris on Friday the 13th of November 2015, an article appeared on the BBC Online that contains the lyrics to La Marseillaise. Some of the lyrics, albeit just in English, are also reprinted elsewhere on pHantaBlog.

Image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude's sculpture for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

Up-shot image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude’s sculpture for l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris

As is rather obvious from this photo taken from that article, the Marseillaise figure on l’Arc de Triomphe (The Triumphant Arch) in Paris is Lady Liberty. However, as below, a different take on it, as shot in the famous train station museum across the river from the Louvre, has been showing up on pH-Webworld since the mid-2000s, if not before.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

An iteration is here <==; another is just up the page (down on this one). Or you could just have a peek at the shots to the side of these paragraphs.

Point being they were used to emphasize the master-servant (more like creator-created) relationship between Heliosophos and All the invincible She-Sphinx of Incain. And Helios is resolutely male.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

Sad-sack excuse for a Webmeister didn’t even note that La Marseillaise figure was female until someone pointed it out to him years later.

Here’s bust full on ==>. The artist’s name was Francois Rude. The former railway station’s name is Musee d’Orsay. L’Arc de Triomphe googles but here’s a link to the real deal: “The Departure of the volunteers of 1792″

In fairness to oft-maligned Webmeister Oz, the sculpture shot in the museum was a bust, as in a figure from the head up. Rude apparently used it as a study before he got around to adding the full version to L’Arc de Triomphe.

The photographer didn’t make it that far up the preposterously, not to mention ostentatiously, wide boulevard from the Louvre until years later. Whereupon said error became manifest, resulting in a decidedly red face … for about minute.

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris; Rude’s study bust looked more male than female

No instructions ever came to remove bust shots from website, so there they remain. As does the Summer 2014 Serendipity entry on the same subject. Understandably entitled ‘Shelios on the Moon‘ it’s at least as funny as this blog spot.

BTW, not only is Helios determinedly male; as Ricardo Sandoval demonstrated on his brilliant 2014 cover for “Helios on the Moon“, All of Incain, shown to Helios’s left, is much better looking than Rude’s version of her.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of “Helios on the Moon”

 

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Sea Silk for Sea Goddess

Guess what Fisherwoman is going to be wearing the next time she appears in a Phantacea Publications’ release, which may well be the next Phantacea Publications’ release?

Then again maybe this is what Sea Goddess is putting on in this detail taken from pH-4, artwork by Ian Bateson, 1979

Ian Bateson artwork circa 1979 for pH-4, modified by Jim McPherson, 2013 4sea_hagfish

Page excepted from pHRv1:DB; Sea Goddess finds something more suitable to wear after 25 years in Limbo

If it’s still online, hit the next blue highlight for the complete BBC Magazine article on Sardinian Sea Silk. Some rather interesting historical notes made therein. Here’s a sample:

Sea Silk is … “an ancient thread, known as byssus, which is mentioned on the Rosetta stone and said to have been found in the tombs of pharaohs.

“Some believe it was the cloth God told Moses to lay on the first altar. It was the finest fabric known to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, and one of its remarkable properties is the way it shines when exposed to the sun, once it has been treated with lemon juice and spices.”

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk, taken from the BBC Magazine online

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk

Apparently it comes from a clam, though equally amazingly the clam is unharmed by the extraction.

Reminds me of a long ago, maybe even long lost, pHantaBlog entry that featured these shots of hagfish slime:

hagfish_66661087_2012-12-1818.25.48

Shot of someone holding up translucent slime from a hagfish from an article in BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime, taken from BBC Magazine online 1 April 2013

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime from BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

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Non-carb noodling on Thunder Cloud Creatures

Jim McPherson, the creator-writer of the Phantacea Mythos, has been noodling of late. Please don’t mention this to his doctor who’s big on no-carbs diets (if such things are possible).

Drawing ascribed to Lakota Sioux chief Black Hawk of Wakinya Thunder Beings, c 1880; scanned in from August 2015 issue of Fortean Times

Drawing ascribed to Lakota Sioux chief Black Hawk of Wakinya Thunder Beings, c 1880; scanned in from August 2015 issue of Fortean Times

As is often the case, said noodling was provoked by an article he read in Fortean Times; this one re folks struck by lightning, sometimes more than once, who nevertheless survive.
Said noodling did result in considerable googling (though no canoodling as yet.) Reportedly he still hasn’t decided if he’s been wrong about Blind Sundown and Raven’s Head all these years (approaching forty, man and mostly boy).
Maybe, despite what they seem to believe themselves, they’re not Creatures of the Cosmos. Maybe they’re ‘Wakinyah’ Thunder Beings.

Original artwork from Phantacea Five, drawing by Vince Marchesano et al, 1980

Original artwork from Phantacea Five, drawing by Vince Marchesano et al, 1980

Hit the blue highlight for both Serendipity and PHANTACEA articles on Wakinyahs and Heyotas as found on pH-Webworld.

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Aphant post salvaged from pHant on pHaceb — 11 Sept 2015

Photograph by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015Most people can readily conjure images inside their head – known as their mind’s eye. Now scientists have described a condition named aphantasia which leaves their brain unable to visualize. Sounds like a truly horrible, if nigh on impossible, condition. 

Ah, but what about aphantacea? That can be avoided by taking action either at last blue highlight or hitting here.

B/w covers of all the novels, mini-novels and graphic novels to date released by Phantacea Publications, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

B/w covers of all the novels, mini-novels and graphic novels to date released by Phantacea Publications

Photograph at top of page taken by Tom Mackie in Iceland, 2014, scanned in from the May 2015 issue of Fortean Times; Nihila artwork by Verne Andru, 2012; banner prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, more on the Serendipity and PHANTACEA webpage.
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