Pronounce Ishtar like Easter because …

That’s where it comes from .. according to some.

Collage taken from web; text unattributed but image is of Queen of the Night from Brit Museum

Collage found online; text unattributed but image is of Queen of the Night from the British Museum in London

Colourized reconstruction of the Queen of the Night, scanned in from a book of the same name published by the British Museum in 2005

Colourized reconstruction of the Queen of the Night, scanned in from a book of the same name published by the British Museum in 2005

Notion that Easter derived from Ishtar is making the rounds again. Tis the season after all.

Myself, I always reckoned Easter came from Eostre or Ostara, hence the bunnies and Easter eggs.

Perhaps oddly, the Wikipedia article on Ishtar doesn’t mention she was the inspiration behind Easter, let alone the word itself. Wonder why that is?

Evidently she did resurrect, however.

========

Cut out of shot taken at front facade of Notre Dame cathedral, taken by Jim McPherson in Paris 2014

To the right of the main entrance to the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris is this stone relief. Seems medieval patriarchies reckoned the serpent in the garden was female; none other than the Demon Lilith, mother of Cain, Slayer of Abel

Michelangelo's version of Lilith as the serpent in the garden, image taken from web

Michelangelo’s version of the Demon Lilith as the serpent in the garden; image taken from the web

Lilith as Serpent of the Garden by Hieronymous Bosch's Vienna Last Judgement, image taken from web then adjusted by Jim McPherson

Lilith as Serpent of the Garden by Hieronymus Bosch’s Vienna Last Judgement, image scanned in from a wall calendar then adjusted by Jim McPherson

In the Phantacea Mythos, the image used in the top graphic isn’t of Ishtar. It’s of Primeval Lilith, the Demon Queen of the Night.

Hieronymus Bosch, Michelangelo and the folks behind the ornamental front facade of Notre Dame seem to think she was the serpent in the garden.

Which sort of fits with the notion promulgated most recently in “Helios on the Moon” that she was the mother of Cain, Adam’s first born son and the slayer of Abel.

========

The Queen of the Night has been in the British Museum for a number of years. This is the explanatory plaque as shot there by Jim McPherson in 2012

The Queen of the Night has been in the British Museum for a number of years. This is the explanatory plaque as shot there by Jim McPherson in 2012

Drawing of Ostara by Johannes Gehrts taken from web

Drawing of Ostara by Johannes Gehrts (1855-1921) taken from web

Scanned in the coloured reconstruction of the Queen of the Night from a booklet of the same name published in 2005 by the British Museum. Notre Dame GIF is mine, as is the shot of the British Museum’s explanatory plaque re same.

Like the collage at top of page, the Michelangelo Eden scene and Gehrts‘s Ostara came from the Web. Scanned in the Bosch from a wall calendar for 2015.

========

Lethal Lily took over Master Morgan Abyss in “The Death’s Head Hellion” and features significantly throughout the upcoming, open-ended saga of Wilderwitch’s Babies.

Henry Fuseli (1741-1825) did a couple of the images featuring Lilith that appear in pH-Webworld. Great Night is here whereas his Night Hag is here.

From the sounds of things in the revised, more like rewritten, version of the ‘Decimation Damnation‘ web serial, Miracle Memory stole Primeval Lilith from Pyrame Silverstar in 5950 during the Male Entity’s eleventh lifetime and kept hold of her until his one hundredth thirty years later.

Potential Dust Cover for "Wilderwitch's Babies 1", collage prepared by Jim McPherson ca 2008

2008 version of cover for “Wilderwitch’s Babies 1 — Decimation Damnation”

Please like & share:

George RR Martin gets top billing — as an editor

Lowball (Wild Cards, #22)Lowball by George R.R. Martin
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Not sure what number this is in the Wild Cards series … 22? 23? Over twenty anyhow. I’ve read most of them. They seem to come out in trilogies so I suspect this is the start of another threesome featuring the same group of central characters. Which isn’t to say it’s altogether free of prehistory.

I certainly remember DB (Drummer Boy), Curveball, Earth Witch, Rustbelt, Ghost and a couple of others from the unfortunate sequence based on Survivor or some such. Almost turned me off Wild Cards. Do seriously get tired of giggly, yet somehow ever so sensitive (melodramatic?, sanctimonious?) millennials giving each other hugs and kisses, spouting OMG every third sentence and basically being indistinguishable from one another, nor any of their other equally shallow, hollowed-out “friends”.

Fortunately that doesn’t happen as often as it did in the last threesome. Indeed, it mostly sticks to Carrie Vaughn’s bottom of the foot contribution.

Yes. it’s another ensemble piece in the form of a mosaic novel. Has contributions from at least six different writers, none of them named George RR Martin despite his top billing on the cover. Second billing goes to his longtime co-editor Melina Snodgrass, who does contribute a sequence that’s copyright by Lumina Enterprises LLC.

Presumably they get together, draw up story ark then bring in Wild Card writers to flesh it out according to preset parameters. I’m guessing that it falls to Snodgrass to oversee the project, tying it together and filling in the inevitable gaps with her contribution to the whole enterprise, the ten-part “Galahad in Blue”.

There’s a great deal of yawn-inducing soap opera in this book. That may pass as character development these days but most of it just seems perfunctory, uninspired and not particularly relevant to the storyline. The Ghost character, for example, hardly does anything but what she does do, well …

It’s a shame about Ghost really. She only appears in one sequence, and then only as a secondary character, but she has lots of potential. How can you not be intrigued with a psychopathic preteen with nifty abilities and a thing for sharp blades.

Hers is arguably the best story in a not bad batch. One hopes Ian Tregillis, a writer I’ve appreciated previously, is holding out for a great whack of an upcoming installment featuring her. Too bad Rustbucket isn’t the best lead, though he did good work in an earlier Wild Cards book, set in Africa, where-in he met and ending adopting Ghost.

Overall a bit of a police procedural set in Jokertown. Typically, in addition to incompent copes and their idiotic supervisors, that means guns, lots of them. Some of the writers come up with a few nicely grotesque Jokers with some decent ancillary talents. The pacing is lively and variations of a couple of the chase sequences will probably appear in the next Captain America or Batman movie.

Seems to me the Aces are mostly recycled, though. We’ve seen teleporters before, almost everywhere we go in the grim-dark, fantasy sub-genre these days. Plus, the shape-shifting, paranoiac Sleeper, Croyd Crenson, does a couple of cameos as a presumed tribute to Jack Kirby’s Thing from Marvel’s Fantastic Four. (Which for many started the whole superhero/supervillain bandwagon  that my own Phantacea Mythos jumped on in 1977.)

Have to say I’m looking forward to what I assume will be two more books in this threesome. There’s something very familiar about one of the unnamed characters who survives Lowball and if it’s who I think it is I may have to go to the library for some some early Wild Card books as my collection has suffered from two many moves and trade-ins at the secondhand bookstore.

Three out five stars but nevertheless recommended if only for its promise of what’s to come.

View all my reviews

Please like & share:

So why isn’t it called Attismas?

On pHantacea on pHacebook, December 19, 2015, there is this note under the entry expanded upon in a separate pHantaBlog entry here:

“Something similar can be found here: http://listverse.com/…/10-christ-like-figures-who…/…. Don’t know anything about Glycon but Zarathustra and Attis appear with some background info. The comments about Dionysus vis-a-vis Christ are, um, intriguing.”

Have now looked up Glycon and discovered, among other things, that it’s a brand name for metformin, an antidiabetic agent used for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus; as monotherapy when hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) cannot be managed with diet and exercise alone.”

Glycon Rumanian Serpent God, image taken from Web

Serpent God worshipped in Black Sea area of what’s nowadays Rumania, where this statuette was found

Which rang a bell, for a couple of altogether disparate reasons. Neither of which is what the post, without any corroborative lynx, says about Glycon:

In the middle of the 100s AD, out along the south coast of the Black Sea, Glycon was the son of the God Apollo, who: came to Earth through a miraculous birth, was the Earthly manifestation of divinity, came to earth in fulfillment of divine prophecy, gave his chief believer the power of prophecy, gave believers the power to speak in tongues, performed miracles, healed the sick, and raised the dead.

Seems Glycon (metaformin) is not derived from from goat’s rue, a kind of Goan curry that I  seem to recall was, despite its name, quite tasty when I visited Goa, India, for a week or so in 2005. Instead the goat’s rue it derives from is a kind of pea also known as French lilac.

Has been making headlines of late, however. One of them is: World’s first anti-ageing drug could see humans live to 120. Plus, according to Wikipedia, world renowned, self-described lazy, comic book writer Alan Moore “… has declared himself a devotee of Glycon.”

Attis taken from Web

Bust taken from web of Phrygain Attis. Note the Liberty Cap or Freedom Hat. It became a symbol during the French Revolution

Admittedly neither has anything to do with Attis. However, for what it’s worth, this does:

“Attis was born on December 25 of the Virgin Nana. He was considered the savior who was slain for the salvation of mankind. His body as bread was eaten by his worshippers. He was both the Divine Son and the Father. On “Black Friday,” he was crucified on a tree, from which his holy blood ran down to redeem the earth. He descended into the underworld. After three days, Attis was resurrected.

Note the picture taken from the post then compare it to the next shot as found on the Louvre’s Website. It’s supposed to be of Mithras, who in PHANTACEA, is the Attis’s father.

For good reason, I’d say.

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Plenty more on Taurus Chrysaor Attis here, here and via the three-site Search Engine atop either of those pages. Earlier blog posts re Solstitial Saviours are here, here and here.

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014. Details and double-click enlargements of most of them can be found on the Phantacea Publications Welcoming Page: http://www.phantacea.com/#graphics

Please like & share:

La Marseillaise is a woman, Mr Webmeister

Here’s a funny story, sort of.

After the events in Paris on Friday the 13th of November 2015, an article appeared on the BBC Online that contains the lyrics to La Marseillaise. Some of the lyrics, albeit just in English, are also reprinted elsewhere on pHantaBlog.

Image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude's sculpture for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

Up-shot image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude’s sculpture for l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris

As is rather obvious from this photo taken from that article, the Marseillaise figure on l’Arc de Triomphe (The Triumphant Arch) in Paris is Lady Liberty. However, as below, a different take on it, as shot in the famous train station museum across the river from the Louvre, has been showing up on pH-Webworld since the mid-2000s, if not before.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

An iteration is here <==; another is just up the page (down on this one). Or you could just have a peek at the shots to the side of these paragraphs.

Point being they were used to emphasize the master-servant (more like creator-created) relationship between Heliosophos and All the invincible She-Sphinx of Incain. And Helios is resolutely male.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

Sad-sack excuse for a Webmeister didn’t even note that La Marseillaise figure was female until someone pointed it out to him years later.

Here’s bust full on ==>. The artist’s name was Francois Rude. The former railway station’s name is Musee d’Orsay. L’Arc de Triomphe googles but here’s a link to the real deal: “The Departure of the volunteers of 1792″

In fairness to oft-maligned Webmeister Oz, the sculpture shot in the museum was a bust, as in a figure from the head up. Rude apparently used it as a study before he got around to adding the full version to L’Arc de Triomphe.

The photographer didn’t make it that far up the preposterously, not to mention ostentatiously, wide boulevard from the Louvre until years later. Whereupon said error became manifest, resulting in a decidedly red face … for about minute.

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris; Rude’s study bust looked more male than female

No instructions ever came to remove bust shots from website, so there they remain. As does the Summer 2014 Serendipity entry on the same subject. Understandably entitled ‘Shelios on the Moon‘ it’s at least as funny as this blog spot.

BTW, not only is Helios determinedly male; as Ricardo Sandoval demonstrated on his brilliant 2014 cover for “Helios on the Moon“, All of Incain, shown to Helios’s left, is much better looking than Rude’s version of her.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of “Helios on the Moon”

 

Please like & share:

Not so marvelous Marseillaise

Just in case you’re tempted to break out in rousing defiance by singing the Marseillaise on your street corner, best recall what you’re belting out ever so robustly:

Do you hear, in the countryside
The roar of those ferocious soldiers?
They’re coming right into your arms
To cut the throats of your sons, your women!

France’s national anthem will be sung by English as well as French fans at Wembley. What’s the story behind the song?
bbc.com
Please like & share:

Sea Silk for Sea Goddess

Guess what Fisherwoman is going to be wearing the next time she appears in a Phantacea Publications’ release, which may well be the next Phantacea Publications’ release?

Then again maybe this is what Sea Goddess is putting on in this detail taken from pH-4, artwork by Ian Bateson, 1979

Ian Bateson artwork circa 1979 for pH-4, modified by Jim McPherson, 2013 4sea_hagfish

Page excepted from pHRv1:DB; Sea Goddess finds something more suitable to wear after 25 years in Limbo

If it’s still online, hit the next blue highlight for the complete BBC Magazine article on Sardinian Sea Silk. Some rather interesting historical notes made therein. Here’s a sample:

Sea Silk is … “an ancient thread, known as byssus, which is mentioned on the Rosetta stone and said to have been found in the tombs of pharaohs.

“Some believe it was the cloth God told Moses to lay on the first altar. It was the finest fabric known to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, and one of its remarkable properties is the way it shines when exposed to the sun, once it has been treated with lemon juice and spices.”

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk, taken from the BBC Magazine online

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk

Apparently it comes from a clam, though equally amazingly the clam is unharmed by the extraction.

Reminds me of a long ago, maybe even long lost, pHantaBlog entry that featured these shots of hagfish slime:

hagfish_66661087_2012-12-1818.25.48

Shot of someone holding up translucent slime from a hagfish from an article in BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime, taken from BBC Magazine online 1 April 2013

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime from BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

Please like & share:

Belatedly Noted: Nuck Drags Recommended (for reading, not smoking, though they are hot)

Seems Stevo recommended “Nuclear Dragons“,  the second entry in the Launch 1980 story cycle, way back in December 2013. Seems also pHantaJim, Blogmeister didn’t find out about it until today:

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island


Stevo’s Monthly Picks (Read-Only Folder)  –  December Book Recommendations (182 views): http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1/messages?msg=189.1

Nuclear Dragons by Jim McPherson, creator/writer, and Ian Bateson, cover artist (Phantacea Publications, $20.00)

The Launching of the Cosmic Express took place on Centauri Island at the end of November 1980. It was destroyed … Or was it? No matter. Its destroyers thought it was. And they’re not done yet.

Who or what can stop them? The Menace on the Moon? Silver-armoured Signal System? Supra-Clones? Loxus Abraham Ryne, the eighty year old head of SPACE (‘The Society for the Prevention of Alien Control of Earth’)? A couple of middle-aged, newly-minted supranormals named Doc Defiance and Mr. No Name?

A twenty-seven year old who neither knows who his parents were nor what an Amoeba Man was? An obesity who knows far more than he should but is disinclined to share that knowledge with anyone, not even his own son? Or maybe, just maybe, a notorious little trickster who has been seven years old for something like sixty years!

Truth told: How can anyone stop Nuclear Dragons!

(Also in the series: “The War of the Apocalyptics”)


Stevo also recommended “Goddess Gambit” but pHantaJIm heard about that not all that after when it came out.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

Please like & share:

Stevo gets graphic — Belatedly noted recommendation for “The Damnation Brigade”

Seems Stevo recommended “The Damnation Brigade” graphic novel way back in December 2013. Seems also pHantaJim, Blogmeister didn’t find out about it until today:

Covers for Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade

Graphic novel compiles the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from pH 1-5 as well as pHz1 #s 1 & 2; for more on the Phantacea comics hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo


Stevo’s Monthly Picks (Read-Only Folder)  –  December Book Recommendations (182 views): http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1/messages?msg=189.1

Phantacea Revisited Volume One: The Damnation Brigade by Jim McPherson, et al. (Phantacea Publications, $12.95

This graphic novel is a compilation of the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from Phantacea 1-5 (1977-1980), Phantacea Phase One #1 (1987) and #2 (unpublished). The cover is by Ian Bateson, 2012, with some additional contributions by Chris Chuckry on the front cover.

Artists include Dave Sim, from just before Cerebus the Aardvark, Ian Bateson, Verne Andru (420, Captain Canuck), George Freeman (Captain Canuck) and Vince Marchesano (Orb).

Jim McPherson wrote the War of the Apocalyptics, a full-length Phantacea Mythos novel based on these stories.


Stevo also recommended “Goddess Gambit” but pHantaJIm heard about that not all that after when it came out.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

Please like & share:

“Infantilize”, “infantilized” and “infantilizing” are words, apparently

How do I know that? From the National Post, Canada’s argument against freedom of the press. See, to put its title succintly: “Infantilized” nature of genre fiction

I looked up “infantilize” on the Free Dictionary and got this:

in·fan·til·ize

(ĭn′fən-tl-īz′, ĭn-făn′-)

tr.v. in·fan·til·ized, in·fan·til·iz·ing, in·fan·til·iz·es

1. To treat or condescend to as if still a young child: The Victorian physician infantilized his patient” (Judith Moore).
2. To reduce to an infantile state or condition: “It creates a crisis that infantilizes them—causes grown men to squabble like kids about trivial things” (New Yorker).

in·fan′til·i·za′tion (-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
Logo reads Phantacea Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated

Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated – Phantacea logo

The article that inspired such simply scintillating research is actually, if awkwardly, entitled:

Simon Pegg is right, geeky genre fiction usually IS childish, even when it’s also something more

While I’ll admit to having heard his name before, I’d have to resort to Google to find out what movies Pegg’s appeared in. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of the article’s author, Daniel Kaszor, though.

However, a couple of his lines struck me as apropos considering some past pHantaBlog posts, notably here, here and here.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst", the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

One that stuck out, since it seems to apply directly to the National Post’s living saint, the Tar Party’s Chief Blue Nasty, is as follows:

“… in the superhero genre … characters are very explicitly given almost god-like powers. It’s a very simple fantasy to want to just be able to punch the world better.”
Which isn’t to say the article’s about Canada’s current and, sadly, stunningly long-serving Prime Minister. It’s (nominally) about the fantasy genre, if not explicitly the grimdark aspect of it.
covers for Damnation Brigade graphic novel

Front and back covers for the upcoming Damnation Brigade graphic novel; artwork by Ian Bateson, 2012; touch-up by Chris Chuckry, 2012; prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

And that derives almost entirely from the celebrity celery pandered to by today’s mainstream media, genre television, video games and society’s seemingly resultant need for instant gratification to go along with a severely reduced attention span.

Here’s the Pegg quote that tops the article:
“I’m very much a self-confessed fan of science-fiction and genre cinema. But part of me looks at society as it is now and thinks we’ve been infantilized by our own taste.” — Simon Pegg
And here’s the writer’s gravy atop the article’s meat and potatoes:

“… more modern fans of genre fiction want to read … “realistic” heroes through a childish mindset.

“And that’s part of what Simon Pegg was griping about — even when presented in an adult manner, genre has a way of being pre-chewed and regurgitated back in such a way that renders much of the nuance moot — signifiers such as brutal violence and grey morals reinterpreted as being cool instead of troubling — making the end product even more childish than the sanitized basic version.”

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

Which echoes Point #4 in the pre-Mithramas Mistletoe Miscellanea posting, the reference being to two of the Gun Porn TV shows made in Vancouver that have since been renewed:

“As to using arrows as implements of torture, using arrows for anything except killing and target practise, there are such things as arteries. Pierce a Captain Boomerang where Arrow hit him, evidently just because he deserved it, and, sorry Flash, it’s not a joking matter.”

So, go to any of the lynx highlighted in blue above and spend some quiet, unhurried, but satisfying time having a read or re-read.

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Just don’t doubt for a minute that Jim McPherson is above infantilizing his characters, if hopefully not his readers:

In the midst of the mad, the dead, and the dying squatted Mars Bellona. His mentality reduced to that of a low-grade simpleton, the presumption of immortality manifestly did not preclude the onset of insanity. The once tremendously powerful Apocalyptic was playing toy samurai with an even more demented Lord Tornado.
“So sorry, Bellona‑sama. I killed your man first.”
“Seppuku-fie yourself, Tornado-san. I killed you before you killed me.”

… from “The War of the Apocalyptics“, 2009

Welcoming portal for pH-Webworld as of Spring 2015

Entry port for pH-Webworld, first appeared in the 2015 Spring update

Please like & share:

Auroral lights no Borealis Brolly

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, recently returned from his late winter, early spring brain break.

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island, artwork by Ian Bateson taken from the front cover of “Nuclear Dragons”, 2013

A brain break for him of course means a new book is on the horizon for Phantacea Publications and pHanta-pHans everywhere. At least it has in the recent past, witness “Nuclear Dragons” and “Helios on the Moon“, the long-awaited concluding entries in the Launch 1980 epic trilogy.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon, 2014

Maybe not this time; at least not in terms of ‘new’ so much as recombined.

More on that as the year progresses, though you might find a couple of mysterious additions to the Earthlings’ row in the ‘Devils by Tribal Affiliation webpage that appeared last January instructive.

For now he’s happy to report some serendipitous readings in the January 2015 edition of Fortean Times (FT 323).


Here’s something I didn’t know. According to ‘Blasts from the Past’, a column by Theo Paijmans in FT 323 (p 32; “#55: The Cities of Lost Children”), an American writer, none other than Charles Fort himself, coined the term ‘teleportation’. (Wikipedia seems to confirm that he did just that — in 1931, to be absolutely precise — here.)

This would be the same Charles Fort (1874-1932), who inspired the delightful oddballs behind Fortean Times to launch, as long ago as 1973, what’s now a regular dweller in my bin of bathroom readings. (In the same issue, Arthur C Clarke is quoted as considering forteans “… ignorant and opinionated science-bashers.”)

Nearer to the beginning of the same issue (pp 6-7), we read about something else — better make that somebody else — I’d never heard of: namely, another American, a stage-managing ‘visionary pictographer’ as much as portrait photographer by the name of William Mortensen (1897-1965).

Talk about Peculiar Perspectives, I’d provide a link re this ‘master of American Grotesque’ but don’t want to get pHantaBlog into trouble. Don’t mind getting the US edition of Huffington Post in trouble, though. So have a boo, literally.

Will say that I googled him, which was where I learned of his relationship to Cecil B DeMIlle and Fay Wray, not to mention King Kong and the Mad Hatter. Also recognized his fabulous photographic imaging of Belphegor, Hell’s perceived Prince of Sloth, among other things, including invention.

(Which begs for an entry on Phantacea and that I’ll pass on to Webmeister Oz after I’m done passing this onto  pHantaJim, Blogmeister.*)

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

Header point being yet another article in FT 323: “I Sing the Mind Electric” by Marinus van der Sluijs (pp 40-43). As a preface, recall this from “Goddess Gambit“:

“Fisherwoman wasn’t there either. Not yet. Then she was, in a way. She was bigger than life, much bigger than Diminished Dustmound … She did look good in a glowingly golden, chain-mail hauberk; no question of that. And there was nothing better against incoming missiles, no matter what they were tipped with, than teleportive Brainrock chains.”

Or this, from the aforementioned:

Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it [teleportive Brainrock-Gypsium] all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

Or this from a few pages later:

She [Fish-Nihila] twirled it, simultaneously raising it as if a Kevlar umbrella; impermeable not just over her, but over most of Diminished Dustmound. She thus rendered it akin to a roiling, Aurora Borealis sunshade; a whirling dervish’s flaring skirts, equally so.

So, not only am I and every other writer in books, for Star Trek, and many another elsewhere, indebted to Charles Fort for the word ‘teleportation’, it seems I’m personally indebted to the magazine he inspired for this quote from van der Sluijs’s article:

“… auroral emissions also occur at ultraviolet, infrared and other wavelengths. Enunciations of a dazzling geometry of dynamic shapes are common to both near-death experiences and eye-witness accounts of aurorae. And, bizarre as it admittedly sounds, there appears to be an uncanny logic to the impression that the auroral lights contain myriad units of incorporeal consciousness exchanging information.”

There’s also this caption under a pretty picture of the Northern Lights:

“… the Aurora Borealis [is] traditionally identified as the abode of posthumous souls.”

All of which makes for quite a stunning example of serendipitous reading, especially when you consider how my recently completed brain-break-writings concluded in terms of the as yet unresolved task of “Annuling Nihila“.

The Serendipity entry’s here. And just in case you need another dose of serendipitous same, on the day Oz prepared it, the CBC Online provided some stunning shots of, well, not Fisherwoman/Nihila’s Borealis Brolly per se, but close. They’re here.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

Please like & share: