Not an autobot — honestly

This came in from a contributor to the BCFSA newsgroup on Yahoo recently (2015-01-29).

[NOTE: names deleted to protect the insensitive; Comments appreciated at bottom of page]

> This is the BCSFA group, not the stupid sluts ass. Banned.

Thank you. On a similar note, what about self-published-book spammers?

To which Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, felt obliged to respond:

Self-published books are about the only way to get something that might not be agent-driven, hence far too often, dried out, regurgitated smuck from “established” publishers too cowed to put out anything actually,  or at least comparatively, new..

Think I’ll post re “Nuclear Dragons” and “Helios on the Moon” shortly.

Jim McPherson
Phantacea Publications

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

 

Which he did. (No word yet if’s been accepted for dissemination, though)

Greetings anew

After debating whether to release “Nuclear Dragons” on Kindle or wait until I can combine it with its companion, “Helios on the Moon“, I decided to release it solo. I may still (re)combine them at some point in the future. I may also reunite the three mini-novels that make up “The 1000 Days of Disbelief” as an e-book and (mildly) interactive PDF, but that’ll have to wait, too.

The easiest way to get a quick read overview of all the Phantacea Mythos publications, with lynx to their various webpages, starts here: http://www.phantacea.com/#DotComPubs.

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

Some of the walk-in bookstores in Vancouver area where you can peruse and, yes, even buy Phantacea Publications are listed here: http://phantacea.com/orderViaCards.htm#walkins. Of course any bookstore anywhere in the world can order them through Ingram Book Distribution.

BTW, the print publication of “Helios on the Moon” officially came out on Sunday 30 November 2014, precisely 34 years after the launching of the Cosmic Express. And that November the 30th was also a Sunday. How’s that for serendipity.

Attached are some nice big shots from the graphics table of that selfsame webpage. Reckon they might tempt you to pay a visit to the Phantacea Publications website. Not surprisingly, since Phantacea started off a series of comic books in the late Seventies, it’s very visual.

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island

 

Comments are both welcomed and encouraged on pHantaBlog (www.phantacea.com/blog).

And I can assure you this is a very much non-robotic contribution to BCFSA.

Jim McPherson
Phantacea Publications

www.phantacea.com
www.phantacea.info
www.phantacea.com/blog

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

.

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Helios on the Moon Press Release

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster prepared to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes covers from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

PRESS RELEASE                                                   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jim McPherson’s long term project to novelize the Phantacea comic book series culminates with “Helios on the Moon”

VANCOUVER, BC: “Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, doesn’t just pick up where its predecessors, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons”, left off. It fills in the blanks they left behind, then blazes onto its own startling conclusion of Phantacea Phase One.

A multi-character extravaganza that’s cosmic in scope, yet very much earth-centric, it takes off with the Cosmic Express on the Thirtieth of November 1980, veers to the far-off planetary Utopia of Weir then, finally, rages back to both sides of the Whole Earth ten days and many lost lives later.

This is the rest of the stunning storyline only touched on during the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels: “The Damnation Brigade” and “Cataclysm Catalyst”. With a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, Book Three of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic trilogy, this is the rest of the story as it happens on the Moon, beyond and, indeed, below it.

And if you think Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos is only going through a phase, you’re right. But what a fantastic phase it is.

For more information contact:

Phantacea Publications
74689 Kitsilano RPO, 2768 West Broadway, Vancouver BC, V6K 4P4
Primary website: http://www.phantacea.com

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Sunday’s McPhersonal adds a Sandovalian

Ricardo Sandoval, the covers artist for “Helios on the Moon“, will be joining Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, at this Sunday’s Vancouver comicon,

And, yes, that means a cover decision has finally been made. Rather, two decisions have been made — one for the upcoming print release of the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle; the other for dot-ditto digital versions of same, unless you’d prefer to refer to them as Hel-Moon PDFs and e-books.

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

That graphic isn’t it (them). This is — better make these are.

And, while you’re there, check these out:

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014.

C>U Sunday at Heritage Hall, (16th and Main in Vancouver).

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Modern mythology meshed with the ancient

Recall this fellow (http://phantacea.com/blog/?p=695) from the Louvre museum in Paris? It’s most of two thousand years old.

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Unfortunately it may not be in the Louvre anymore — at least Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, couldn’t find it when he was there in June 2014. (Plenty of his shots from Paris are on pHanta-pHlickr starting here, with commentary from your faithful blog-meister.)

However, aka Generic, as opposed to geriatric, Sol and Generic Luna live on here …

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

and here …

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

The two fellows in opposite corners at the top of both collages are, yes, Helios the Sun God and Mnemosyne the Moon Goddess as they looked all those centuries ago in Imperial Roman times.

(Generic Luna is sometimes erroneously called Selene. She’s not to be confused with the Silver Signaller who uses Selene as her code name, though that’s the latter day Greek goddess where she got it from.)

In terms of the Phantacea Mythos, Helios and Mnemosyne are two of its cornerstone characters, without whom there would be no such a thing. (pH-Webworld = Modern Age Mythology.) They’re the the time-tumbling Dual Entities; of whom much, much more can be found here, with even more lynx.

As for the six internal collages themselves, more on them currently links from here; double click to enlarge in a separate window. Just bye the bye, both collages have been added to the ever-growing heading banners of, you guessed it, pHantaBlog.

You can also buy the buy “Helios on the Moon“, the climactic entry of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle and, indeed, of Phantacea Phase One itself. Order online, with credit card, here or direct from the publisher here.

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Three fronts and a back

“Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ epic fantasy, is almost ready for print.

(Lynx to many excerpts from the novel, yet another breathtakingly exciting ensemble piece from Phantacea Publications, are here; more on the trilogy is here and here.)


The back cover looks and reads well but still can’t decide on front. What’s your favourite? Kindly make your choice and add a comment at bottom of page.

The front cover depicts what’s become of Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur, the onetime Unity of Order, 500 years after his last appearance in “Janna Fangfingers“. He’s advancing menacingly on the Male Entity, Heliosophos (Helios called Sophos the Wise).

The She-Sphinx, All of Incain, is beside Helios. The UNES Liberty is in lunar orbit with Planet Earth in the background. The Liiberty was mentioned in “Nuclear Dragons“. All appeared throughout ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ trilogy, but made her biggest splash in “Feeling Theocidal“.

The Dual Entities have never appeared, at least not explicitly, in any of the Phantacea Mythos novels thus far released by Phantacea Publications. They are, however, among the Cornerstone Characters in Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos (of whom much more is here).

The first front cover is as provided by the artist, Ricardo Sandoval.

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic


The second front cover incorporates the outer space background used in the mock-up used most recently on pHantaBlog here. The She-Sphinx, All of Incain, is also whiter than in other two covers.


The third front cover goes back to the first sphinx but meshes the Earth from the first and the outer space of the second.


The back cover text now reads:

The Dual Entities return to their own timeline determined to make life perfect for everyone.

Heads are bound to roll!

Scientists first detect signals coming from outer space in early 1978. Finally there is proof humanity isn’t alone. A month later, they pinpoint the source. Elation gives way to near-panic. The beams are coming from the Earth’s moon!

The United Nations’ Security Council agrees to meet this off-worldly intrusion aggressively. The result, the UNES Liberty, is already in lunar orbit when, on the Thirtieth of November 1980, the launching of the Cosmic Express takes place on the Outer Earth’s Centauri Island.

At the same time, three Great Goddesses preside over an extraordinary session of the Courtroom of the Visionary in the far off Utopia of New Weir. Meanwhile, on the Inner Earth of Sedon’s Head, the Hidden Continent’s most revered Death Gods prepare to welcome home the entirety of their fragmented family, devils almost to a one.

From the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos comes the culmination of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle. Plus, a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, the concluding novel in ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ fantasy masterpiece.

As for who’s depicted under the text on the back cover, that’s here.

Back cover, minus text, for "Helios on the Moon"; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014s

Background images for back cover of “Helios on the Moon”; text and obligatory boxes at bottom to be added; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

 

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Back Blurb Flag-Poled

Back Cover Text for “Helios on the Moon”

Don’t expect any salutes but reckon tentative-it deserves a run-up anyhow.

Text will override Ricardo Sandoval’s bas-relief figures on Helios as Sol, All of Incain, Moon Memory as Luna, the Unity of Order, Doc Defiance, Cosmicaptain Starrus, the Indescribable Mr No Name and Mnemosyne as Strife.

Comments welcome at bottom.

Back cover, minus text, for "Helios on the Moon"; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014s

Background images for back cover of “Helios on the Moon”; text and obligatory boxes at bottom to be added; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

The Dual Entities return to their own timeline determined to make life for everyone not just vastly better but perfect.

Heads are sure to roll.

Scientists first detected signals coming from somewhere out in space in early 1978. Their excitement was palpable. Finally they had proof humanity wasn’t alone in the cosmos. Then, about a month after their initial detection, the source was pinpointed. Elation immediately gave way to near-panic. The beams were coming from the Earth’s moon!

In an extraordinary session of the Security Coun­cil, the United Nations agreed to meet this off-worldly intrusion aggress­ively. The result, the UNES Liberty, is already in moon orbit when, on the Thirtieth of November 1980, the launching of the Cosmic Express takes place on Centauri Island.

At the same time, on the far off Utopia of New Weir, three Great Goddess preside over the latest session of the Courtroom of the Visionary. Meanwhile, on the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head, the Death Gods of the Frozen Lathakra prepare to welcome home the entirety of their fragmented family, devils almost to a one.

From the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos comes the culmination of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, plus a surprising addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, the final book in ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ fantasy masterpiece.

Covers and/or splash panels reflecting action recounted in "Helios on the Moon"

Front covers for pH-2 and pH- 4Ever&40 graphic novel bracketing splash panel from pH3; artwork by Gordon Parker, 1978; Peter Lynde, 1978; and the two Ians, Fry and Bateson, 1990

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Feeling Archival

Front Cover Ad for "Nuclear Dragons", art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Front Cover Ad for “Nuclear Dragons”, art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

Publisher got an email from India recently. Correspondent wanted free copies of “Goddess Gambit” and the first two entries in the ‘Launch 1980’ trilogy*, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragoons“.

(*Launch 1980 = Jim McPherson’s currently only two-thirds completed project to novelize the comic book series. The last one, “Helios on the Moon“, should be coming out this Spring.)

Promise was to review the books for Goodreads. However, having checked out cost of shipping books to India ($20.00 per book surface, meaning by boat, expected delivery 2 months), publisher declined.

Correspondent persisted so publisher agree to send off Gambit, his favourite. (Writer’s favourite as well, despite someone once saying it was for aficionados of the weird and wild, or words to that effect.

Full Cover for "Goddess Gambit", artwork by Verne Andru 2011/12

Full Cover for “Goddess Gambit”, artwork by Verne Andru 2011/12

At any rate, publisher found this in archives. It was a long-prior-to-publication blurb for “Feeling Theocidal“, the first full-length Mythos novel ever published. Have a boo.

Jim McPherson’s PHANTACEA Mythos

Devils, Demons, Dates and suchlike Diverse Details

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007; for more hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#MitRuptNot1

Thanks in large measure to monotheistic religions the Gods and Goddesses, the Demons and Monsters, of Antique Mythology have been trivialized, their worship proscribed and the entities themselves confined to another realm. This realm is known by various names. In some folk traditions it is called the ‘Otherworld’, in others ‘Shadowland’, and to this day in places like Tibet it is often referred to as the Inner Earth.

In the PHANTACEA Mythos it goes by all these names and a number of others, most prominently Big Shelter and the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head. That it’s been hidden since the time of the Great Flood of Genesis (the ‘Genesea’), take that as a given. That it’s hidden by the Cathonic Zone or Dome, that’s reflected in how its inhabitants count time: in Years of the Dome (YD). The sub-titular Thrygragon of “Feeling Theocidal” occurs in 4376 YD. That makes it 376 AD: four thousand three hundred and seventy-six years after the Genesea subsided.

There are a great many supernatural entities living beneath, or within, the Dome. I make a distinction between ‘Cathonic’ or skyborn and ‘Chthonic’ or earthborn beings. The latter include such familiar creatures of folklore as faeries and demons while the former are the Fallen Angels or devils of the Bible. With respect to devils, because they are described as fallen I take that to mean they are extraterrestrial in origin. To a number of the Earth-centric, Mother Goddess worshipping characters in the PHANTACEA Mythos that makes them less supernatural than unnatural and, hence, their enemy.

Collage entitled Great Gods Going Crazy, prepared by Jim McPherson, ca 2007

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007; for more hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#MitRuptNot1

I also refer to devils as being members of the ‘devazur’ race since, to simplify matters some­what, ‘devas’ or ‘devs’ in Indian or Kurdish tradition are gods whilst my azuras or their ‘asur­as’ are demons. Yet, in the Zoroastrian tradition of the neighbouring Persians, the opposite holds true. (In fact I’ve been given to understand that the word ‘ahura’, from whence come azura and asura, just means lord or lady, depending on the context.) All in all, then, it just made sense to combine the two into devazur.

It is my contention that the Sanskrit word ‘deva’ is the root for English words such as devil, deity, divine, diva, and the Indian honorific, Devi. It seems to me that the Latin word for God, ‘Deus’, is just a variation of ‘dev’. This appears self-evident when you consider that in English the plural of ‘dev’ is ‘devs’ and the Romans wrote ‘Deus’ as ‘devs’.

Three tribes constitute the devazur race. These are the Mithradites, the Byronics and the La­zar­emists. They are named after the tribes’ (nominal) male primogenitors: Thrygragos Varuna Mithras, Thrygragos Byron and Thrygragos Lazareme.

As for their three female primogenitors, they are, or were, the Trigregos Sisters: Sapiendev the Mind, Demeter the Body and Devaura the Spirit. Except in flashbacks, they don’t feature in “Feeling Theocidal”. However, their terrible talismans definitely do.

And will as the PHANTACEA Mythos progresses. That’s why the novel’s also called: “The Thrice Cursed Godly Glories – Book One”.

========

E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008
E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Note: Much of the above material was taken from the Moloch Manoeuvres webpage (http://www.phantacea.info/molmyth1.htm#contents). Lynx to tons more information on the PHANTACEA Mythos can be found on www.phantacea.com’s long-running progenitor: pH-Webworld.

Check out its features page (http://www.phantacea.info/ph1.htm#logo), main menu (http://www.phantacea.info/ph2.htm#logo) and terms pages (http://www.phantacea.info/term.htm#logo) for starters.

Written ca 2005/6 as an intro to the “Feeling Theocidal” manuscript then going through the submission process. There’s a Travels essay from 2005 re Jim McPherson’s one and only trip to India here.

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Found and fidgeted – War-Pox Press Release

The War of the Apocalyptics Press Release

On-page Lynx

This isn’t quite how it originally appeared in e-mails sent out in late 2009, early 2010, but that’s mostly because some of the lynx were changed to protect the vanished:

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for “The War of the Apocalyptics”, 2009

Top of the Post

 

PRESS RELEASE                                                  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Latest PHANTACEA Mythos novel now available

VANCOUVER, BC: Phantacea Publications is pleased to announce “The War of the Apocalyptics”, the latest PHANTACEA Mythos Print Publication and the first book in the ‘Launch 1980′ story cycle, is now available for ordering worldwide.

Set primarily in the Aleutians, Vancouver Canada and Subcranial Temporis, beneath the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head, between November 30, 1980 and Tantalar 6, 5980, here’s a summary of how it begins:

On November 30, 1980 New Century Enterprises launched the Cosmic Express from Centauri Island, a tri-peaked, mostly man-joined islet off the coast of Maui. With its 6 detachable cosmicars, its central hub-vessel and its overall command-craft, over 60 individuals were on the Express. Intercepted by a Kamikaze craft seconds after launch it never made it to Outer Space. Instead, in what appeared to be a devastating explosion, it was thrust elsewhere.

Whereupon it broke apart!

One of the cosmicars crashed on Damnation Island, in the Aleutians, where the last battle of the Secret War of Supranormals was fought on Christmas Day 1955. A 3-eyed, blue-skinned being, conceivably the very deity once worshipped by Mesoamericans as ‘hurican’ or hurricane, came out of the sky riding a whirlwind conjured from his lower body. The downed space vehicle looked empty. It wasn’t.

An earthen horror confronted the whirling entity. Devil Wind and Demon Land went at each other unrelentingly. When it was over, they apparently weren’t around anymore. Neither were 5 more of their fallen angel ilk, including the four titular Apocalyptics: War, Disease, Disaster and Death, who looked very much pregnant.

In their place stood the 10 members of the newly christened Damnation Brigade. They were the last of the supranormals, back in the realm of the fully alive for the first time in a quarter century. Although mortal and mostly human, they may yet prove to be the sons and daughters of the gods and goddesses, the demons and monsters, of antique mythology.

Regardless of that, they are to say the least aptly named.

Orders paid for with credit cards can be placed through amazon.com immediately; other major online ordering sites will follow in short order. Dependent on location, booksellers and bookseller cooperatives can place bulk orders for the novel via either Ingram Books or Ingram International.

The book contains a foreword and an afterword by the author. It also contains the first chapter of the next PHANTACEA Mythos print publication. The sequel to “Feeling Theocidal” and the second book in ‘Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ trilogy, it is entitled “The 1000 Days of Disbelief” and will be released in 2010.

Relevant online lynx are as follows:

Jim McPherson
Creator/Writer/Publisher
The PHANTACEA Mythos

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Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

Front Cover Ad for "Nuclear Dragons", art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Front Cover Ad for “Nuclear Dragons”, art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

For some reason War-Pox didn’t appear as an e-book until 2012.

Nuclear Dragons” is the second entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle.

The ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle is Jim McPherson’s obviously long-running project to novelize the PHANTACEA comic books not only as published but as promised back in the late Seventies.

The  final entry in the cycle will be “Helios on the Moon“, which is due for release in 2014. After that, well, who can say where McPherson will take us? Certainly not me — and I’m pHantaJIm.

Helios on the Moon, front cover of Phantacea Three, art by Richard Sandoval, 1978

Artwork from the “Helios on the Moon” side of pH-3, which was a flip book; Richard Sandoval, 1978

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Nuclear Dragons now available from Phantacea Publications

PRESS RELEASE                                                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jim McPherson’s ongoing project to novelize the Phantacea comic book series continues with “Nuclear Dragons”

Nuclear Dragons Interactive PDF

VANCOUVER, BC: In 2009 Phantacea Publications released “The War of the Apocalyptics”, the opening entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle. At its centre stood the same stirring saga of extraterrestrial Shining Ones and the doomed but unyielding Damnation Brigade as that related in “Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade”.

That 2013 graphic novel gleaned material from the pages of Phantacea 1-5 (1977-1980) as well as Phantacea Phase One (mid-1980s). Its novelization’s until then untold Outer Earth sequences introduced or re-introduced a number of fascinating protagonists; ones who appeared or would have appeared in the comic book series had it continued.

With a breathtaking cover by Ian Bateson, “Nuclear Dragons” turns the spotlight back on many of them.

Front and Back Covers for "Nuclear Dragons"; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

Front and Back Covers for “Nuclear Dragons”; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

Given what’s coming, though, if they’re on Centauri Island days after the launching of the Cosmic Express, will any of them last long enough to return for a third entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle?

No matter. Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos is as full of incredible individuals as it is of astonishing challenges for them, and/or others, to survive.

Review copies available. For more information contact:

Phantacea Publications
74689 Kitsilano RPO, 
2768 West Broadway, 
Vancouver BC, V6K 4P4
Primary website: http://www.phantacea.com
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Nuclear Non-Dragons

Page Lynx

Top of Page; Onwards

 No, it wasn’t either a bad dream or a false memory; it happened

On 23 January 1961 an American “B-52 plane went into an uncontrolled spin over North Carolina” and dropped not one, but two Hydrogen Bombs!

Image taken from BBC article online re the North Carolina dropped H-Bomb

Image taken from BBC article online re the North Carolina dropped H-Bomb

Evidently, “one fell to the ground unarmed. But the second “assumed it was being deliberately released over an enemy target – and went through all its arming mechanisms save one, and very nearly detonated over North Carolina … Only the failure of a single low-voltage switch prevented disaster.”

Webpage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24183879

Top of Page; Onwards
Front Cover Ad for "Nuclear Dragons", art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Front Cover Ad for “Nuclear Dragons”, art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

An H-Bomb that went off 8 years earlier on Salvation Island in the South Pacific figures in the back-story of both Launch 1980 full length novels: “The War of the Apocalyptics” and, as one might expect, “Nuclear Dragons“.

Here’s one such reference:

A Summoning Child like so many eventual supranormals, he was killed on Christmas Day 1953, during an unannounced explosion of a hydro­gen bomb on a South Sea lump of land howsoever presciently named Salvation Island by grateful, 16th Century, Portuguese missionaries to Micronesia (presumably because the natives never tried to eat them). Being thus vapourized was, to be put it mildly, a hell of way to celebrate one’s 33rd birthday.

This particular Summoning Child was one of number born on Christmas Day 1920. His name was Jesus Mandam. He’s definitely dead but there is some suggestion that his Callion-Clone is still with us in 1980.

Significantly the designs Jess or Jesse, as everyone except his even longer gone mother (Mary Magdalene born Ryne, Abe Ryne’s hence equally born-with-the-century twin sister), called him on a daily basis, made while he was still alive were left in the Soviet Supracity after his death.

They formed the basis for, among many other things, a good percentage of the technology that went into the Cosmic Express. And, as per the book’s back cover text here, its launch and subsequent (apparent) destruction are finally, if as yet perhaps not fully, described in the latest Phantacea Mythos entry in the Launch 1980 story cycle as released by Phantacea Publications.

Top of Page; Onwards
E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

pH-Webworld character lynx

Do we know who was born with Nergal Vetala, the once again Vampire Queen of the Dead in Tantalar 5980, inside her on Christmas Day 1920?

In pHantacea-pHact, we do as of “Goddess Gambit“.  (Truth told, those who followed the Phantacea Web Serials knew that a long time ago.) It’s

Top of Page; Backwards
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