PVR Perversions — Grimdark Supercreeps

pHantaBlog NOTE: Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, doesn’t do confessionals. He does McPhersonals. Sometimes they’re rants. Fortunately those are few and far between. That said, here’s another one.

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Grimdark – NRA-approved Fantasy Genre

Some months ago (November 2014), I prepared a piece for pHantaBlog entitled “All-American Gun Porn – Shot in Vancouver”. (Revisited late last December in Mistletoe Miscellanea.)

In the original I mostly raged on about three ‘superhero’ or ‘fantastical’, albeit not particularly fantastic, TV shows filmed in Vancouver: “Arrow”, “The Flash” and “The 100”.

I’m only moderately surprised to note they’ve been renewed for another season. (Have to say that, given the grimdark death toll in the last specious specimen in particular, it might have to be renamed “The 20”.)

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

Also renewed, according to the Web, are two others I mentioned in the same essay: “Gotham” and “Grimm”. They’re gun porn, too. Except their ‘heroes’ are, for the most part, policemen.

The police, in Canada and the USA anyhow, are allowed to carry guns as well as use them; television-typically with deadly force. Unless of course the recipient of said riveting attention might be needed for subsequent episodes.

Or, in the TV-titular case of both Arrow and Flash, who seem to get shot or otherwise incapacitated a lot, albeit without much in the way of repercussions, they’re either immune to lead poisoning or supranormally gifted with a Wolverine-like knack for extremely quick recoveries.

In that regard, without recourse to the Resurrection Pit Arrow even survived Ra’s al Ghul driving a sword though his chest, and out the other side, missing both heart and spine, since the last time I wrote about the show. The explanation, besides ratings, seems to have something to do with cold air and frozen ground.

Good thing al Ghul had the common courtesy to pull out the sword before dropping him onto a cliff’s edge only a few dozen feet down from where he ‘killed’ him. (Dropped him undamaged any more than he already was, I should add. No cracking bones or snapping neck for our hero; not even a mild concussion.)

Whereupon Ra’s left him exposed to kindly elements and Himalayan vultures; ones that turned out to be human good Samaritans who just happened to be in the vicinity. (One of whom had also been thousands of miles away in Vancouver, er Starling City, in the previous scene.)

Be that as it may, back to Grimm and Gotham. According to the lazy logic of television fantasies, cops not only can get away with killing, the shows are set up such that their be-badged protagonists can do just that, get away with what amounts to murder in sensible conversations.

Killing is part of their job description, don’t you know. And, as mentioned in the previous article(s), super — not to mention invariably supercilious — villains in television are best dealt with both deservedly and biblically. (With the same proviso re subsequent episodes.)

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

I was prepared to let “Gotham” escape the dreaded (or not), NRA-approved, gun-porn denigration if only because I reckoned there was a lot of Chester Gould’s quirky “Dick Tracy” about it. After all, Tracy got shot a lot too, albeit usually in the left shoulder.

(As recorded in a Wikipedia article, Mad Magazine once counted up 47 times that Gould’s Dick Tracy had been shot in that very same, supposedly non-lethal place.

(In a similar vein, ha, ha, Al Capp famously ventilated Fearless Fosdick, his parody of Tracy in the Li’l Abner strip, much more, um, holistically – as in holey – on a regular basis.)

Rather, Gotham started out that way. Nowadays it seems more about lesser, as in secondary, characters and a few others invented solely for the series (as opposed to those taken from the comics).

Which is understandable given the likes of Jim Gordon, Alfred Pennyworth, Harvey thus-far-only-One-Face Dent, Detective also-Harvey Bullock, Selena Kyle, Penguin, Riddler, Poison Ivy, et al, have to live long enough to meet Batman once he gets all brave and bold big enough to don the cape and cowl.

Still, they’re a dull lot. Wouldn’t have made the DC Universe in the first place. Or wouldn’t have lasted long if they had.

BTW, Bruce Wayne appears to be 12 or 13 whereas Selena, the future Catwoman, and Ivy look to be in their slightly later teens, albeit no more than 14 or 15. The expectations, therefore, are obviously for a long series.

Good luck with that. Unless its producers, show-runners and, especially, its writers come up with some much better, as in far more original and intriguingly villainous, cannon fodder, it’ll be gone by Christmas.

The colour side of a postcard Jim McPherson prepared in 2012 as a handout; artwork taken from cover of "Goddess Gambit"; artwork by Verne Andru

The colour side of a postcard Jim McPherson prepared in 2012 as a handout; artwork taken from cover of “Goddess Gambit”; artwork by Verne Andru

(That they made 14 or 15-year old Selena a wanton killer in a recent episode should mean its renewal is cancelled with immediate effect. Should also mean, as a consequence, that its producers are put in jail for deliberate child abuse via role model perversion.

(Too bad neither is very likely to happen. Where’s the Comic Code guy – Fredric Wertham – when we need him?)

In addition to gun porn, these series sadly share what strikes me as a distinct lack of inspired storytelling. When bullets solve everything, that’s to be expected.

Cops are as craven as they are corrupt. (In both Arrow and Gotham lunatic jerks swagger imperiously into cop-shops, pull out their penile pistols, shoot the place up and simply walk away unscathed.) Except when they’re tenacious, that is.

The same batch of boys in blue who cower underneath tables when the really bad guys are popping off, bullets-wise, suddenly gain cojones in Arrow once the overarching plot demands they go after our grimdark hero for being an, um, lawless vigilante. This for the second time in the series.

(And, talk about unimaginative, in a recent Flash chest-zapping CPR is applied not once but twice in the same 40-odd minute episode. Same producer, same stories, I guess. Not hiring creative talent does save on the overhead.)

Overarching plot is Grimm’s saving grace; that, plus some genuinely interesting characters, ones who don’t just use their guns to kill monsters, though they do that too, once in a while. Grimm also has some decent makeup, this despite not much in the way of a special effects budget. Which, in its own way, is a saving grace.

Launch 1980 promo for "Helios on the Moon", artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

Promo using the cover for the print version of “Helios on the Moon” as digitally tweaked by Jim McPherson, 2014; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; based on front cover for pH-3; that’s All of Incain (Ginny the Gynosphinx) beside Helios and Lord Order sneaking up on him from behind;

Contrast that with another superhero-type series I PVR: “Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD”. It does have a decent budget, apparently, and it’s Marvel-inspired, not DC, which should make for more imaginative fare.

And for the most part it does. Plus, Joss Whedon, the guy behind Buffy, is behind SHIELD as well as the related Avengers’ movies. Yet it hasn’t been renewed for some reason.

Not enough guns and guts (spilled) perhaps? Or maybe it hasn’t got the NRA’s stamp (or stomp) of approval.

Shall have more to say re the relatively recently proclaimed Grimdark Fantasy genre in a future instalment of pHantaBlog.

In the meantime, in terms of my very own Phantacea Mythos anyhow, it doesn’t get much grimmer and darker than “Goddess Gambit”, where it could be (and has been, albeit not by me) argued that the impression’s left no one survives. (Until “Helios on the Moon“, that is.).

Doubt it’d get a stomp of approval, let alone a 21-gun salute. from gun owners, though. That’s due to the pHanta-pHact they’re given the treatment they deserve.

Which is mostly mockery.

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014.

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Helios on the Moon exposed at long last

Jim McPherson, the creator-writer of the Phantacea Mythos, shall be manning the Phantacea Publications​ half-table at Heritage Hall this Sunday, 22 March. It’s the first Vancouver Comic Con of the year, so how can you miss it?

Even more importantly, he’ll have with him fresh-off-the-press copies of “Helios on the Moon“, the culminating novel in the Launch 1980 story cycle, as well as the three Phantacea graphic novels and first four comics from the original series.

The Vancouver Comic Con’s website is here. The address for Heritage Hall is:

3102 Main Street
(Main & 15th Avenue)
Vancouver BC

Poster for March Comic Con at Heritage Hall

Jim McPherson shall be there with “Helios on the Moon”

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Auroral lights no Borealis Brolly

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, recently returned from his late winter, early spring brain break.

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island, artwork by Ian Bateson taken from the front cover of “Nuclear Dragons”, 2013

A brain break for him of course means a new book is on the horizon for Phantacea Publications and pHanta-pHans everywhere. At least it has in the recent past, witness “Nuclear Dragons” and “Helios on the Moon“, the long-awaited concluding entries in the Launch 1980 epic trilogy.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon, 2014

Maybe not this time; at least not in terms of ‘new’ so much as recombined.

More on that as the year progresses, though you might find a couple of mysterious additions to the Earthlings’ row in the ‘Devils by Tribal Affiliation webpage that appeared last January instructive.

For now he’s happy to report some serendipitous readings in the January 2015 edition of Fortean Times (FT 323).


Here’s something I didn’t know. According to ‘Blasts from the Past’, a column by Theo Paijmans in FT 323 (p 32; “#55: The Cities of Lost Children”), an American writer, none other than Charles Fort himself, coined the term ‘teleportation’. (Wikipedia seems to confirm that he did just that — in 1931, to be absolutely precise — here.)

This would be the same Charles Fort (1874-1932), who inspired the delightful oddballs behind Fortean Times to launch, as long ago as 1973, what’s now a regular dweller in my bin of bathroom readings. (In the same issue, Arthur C Clarke is quoted as considering forteans “… ignorant and opinionated science-bashers.”)

Nearer to the beginning of the same issue (pp 6-7), we read about something else — better make that somebody else — I’d never heard of: namely, another American, a stage-managing ‘visionary pictographer’ as much as portrait photographer by the name of William Mortensen (1897-1965).

Talk about Peculiar Perspectives, I’d provide a link re this ‘master of American Grotesque’ but don’t want to get pHantaBlog into trouble. Don’t mind getting the US edition of Huffington Post in trouble, though. So have a boo, literally.

Will say that I googled him, which was where I learned of his relationship to Cecil B DeMIlle and Fay Wray, not to mention King Kong and the Mad Hatter. Also recognized his fabulous photographic imaging of Belphegor, Hell’s perceived Prince of Sloth, among other things, including invention.

(Which begs for an entry on Phantacea and that I’ll pass on to Webmeister Oz after I’m done passing this onto  pHantaJim, Blogmeister.*)

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

Header point being yet another article in FT 323: “I Sing the Mind Electric” by Marinus van der Sluijs (pp 40-43). As a preface, recall this from “Goddess Gambit“:

“Fisherwoman wasn’t there either. Not yet. Then she was, in a way. She was bigger than life, much bigger than Diminished Dustmound … She did look good in a glowingly golden, chain-mail hauberk; no question of that. And there was nothing better against incoming missiles, no matter what they were tipped with, than teleportive Brainrock chains.”

Or this, from the aforementioned:

Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it [teleportive Brainrock-Gypsium] all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

Or this from a few pages later:

She [Fish-Nihila] twirled it, simultaneously raising it as if a Kevlar umbrella; impermeable not just over her, but over most of Diminished Dustmound. She thus rendered it akin to a roiling, Aurora Borealis sunshade; a whirling dervish’s flaring skirts, equally so.

So, not only am I and every other writer in books, for Star Trek, and many another elsewhere, indebted to Charles Fort for the word ‘teleportation’, it seems I’m personally indebted to the magazine he inspired for this quote from van der Sluijs’s article:

“… auroral emissions also occur at ultraviolet, infrared and other wavelengths. Enunciations of a dazzling geometry of dynamic shapes are common to both near-death experiences and eye-witness accounts of aurorae. And, bizarre as it admittedly sounds, there appears to be an uncanny logic to the impression that the auroral lights contain myriad units of incorporeal consciousness exchanging information.”

There’s also this caption under a pretty picture of the Northern Lights:

“… the Aurora Borealis [is] traditionally identified as the abode of posthumous souls.”

All of which makes for quite a stunning example of serendipitous reading, especially when you consider how my recently completed brain-break-writings concluded in terms of the as yet unresolved task of “Annuling Nihila“.

The Serendipity entry’s here. And just in case you need another dose of serendipitous same, on the day Oz prepared it, the CBC Online provided some stunning shots of, well, not Fisherwoman/Nihila’s Borealis Brolly per se, but close. They’re here.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Not an autobot — honestly

This came in from a contributor to the BCFSA newsgroup on Yahoo recently (2015-01-29).

[NOTE: names deleted to protect the insensitive; Comments appreciated at bottom of page]

> This is the BCSFA group, not the stupid sluts ass. Banned.

Thank you. On a similar note, what about self-published-book spammers?

To which Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, felt obliged to respond:

Self-published books are about the only way to get something that might not be agent-driven, hence far too often, dried out, regurgitated smuck from “established” publishers too cowed to put out anything actually,  or at least comparatively, new..

Think I’ll post re “Nuclear Dragons” and “Helios on the Moon” shortly.

Jim McPherson
Phantacea Publications

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

 

Which he did. (No word yet if’s been accepted for dissemination, though)

Greetings anew

After debating whether to release “Nuclear Dragons” on Kindle or wait until I can combine it with its companion, “Helios on the Moon“, I decided to release it solo. I may still (re)combine them at some point in the future. I may also reunite the three mini-novels that make up “The 1000 Days of Disbelief” as an e-book and (mildly) interactive PDF, but that’ll have to wait, too.

The easiest way to get a quick read overview of all the Phantacea Mythos publications, with lynx to their various webpages, starts here: http://www.phantacea.com/#DotComPubs.

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

Some of the walk-in bookstores in Vancouver area where you can peruse and, yes, even buy Phantacea Publications are listed here: http://phantacea.com/orderViaCards.htm#walkins. Of course any bookstore anywhere in the world can order them through Ingram Book Distribution.

BTW, the print publication of “Helios on the Moon” officially came out on Sunday 30 November 2014, precisely 34 years after the launching of the Cosmic Express. And that November the 30th was also a Sunday. How’s that for serendipity.

Attached are some nice big shots from the graphics table of that selfsame webpage. Reckon they might tempt you to pay a visit to the Phantacea Publications website. Not surprisingly, since Phantacea started off a series of comic books in the late Seventies, it’s very visual.

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island

 

Comments are both welcomed and encouraged on pHantaBlog (www.phantacea.com/blog).

And I can assure you this is a very much non-robotic contribution to BCFSA.

Jim McPherson
Phantacea Publications

www.phantacea.com
www.phantacea.info
www.phantacea.com/blog

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Helios on the Moon Press Release

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster prepared to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes covers from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

PRESS RELEASE                                                   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jim McPherson’s long term project to novelize the Phantacea comic book series culminates with “Helios on the Moon”

VANCOUVER, BC: “Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, doesn’t just pick up where its predecessors, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons”, left off. It fills in the blanks they left behind, then blazes onto its own startling conclusion of Phantacea Phase One.

A multi-character extravaganza that’s cosmic in scope, yet very much earth-centric, it takes off with the Cosmic Express on the Thirtieth of November 1980, veers to the far-off planetary Utopia of Weir then, finally, rages back to both sides of the Whole Earth ten days and many lost lives later.

This is the rest of the stunning storyline only touched on during the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels: “The Damnation Brigade” and “Cataclysm Catalyst”. With a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, Book Three of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic trilogy, this is the rest of the story as it happens on the Moon, beyond and, indeed, below it.

And if you think Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos is only going through a phase, you’re right. But what a fantastic phase it is.

For more information contact:

Phantacea Publications
74689 Kitsilano RPO, 2768 West Broadway, Vancouver BC, V6K 4P4
Primary website: http://www.phantacea.com

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Sunday’s McPhersonal adds a Sandovalian

Ricardo Sandoval, the covers artist for “Helios on the Moon“, will be joining Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, at this Sunday’s Vancouver comicon,

And, yes, that means a cover decision has finally been made. Rather, two decisions have been made — one for the upcoming print release of the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle; the other for dot-ditto digital versions of same, unless you’d prefer to refer to them as Hel-Moon PDFs and e-books.

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

That graphic isn’t it (them). This is — better make these are.

And, while you’re there, check these out:

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014.

C>U Sunday at Heritage Hall, (16th and Main in Vancouver).

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Modern mythology meshed with the ancient

Recall this fellow (http://phantacea.com/blog/?p=695) from the Louvre museum in Paris? It’s most of two thousand years old.

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Unfortunately it may not be in the Louvre anymore — at least Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, couldn’t find it when he was there in June 2014. (Plenty of his shots from Paris are on pHanta-pHlickr starting here, with commentary from your faithful blog-meister.)

However, aka Generic, as opposed to geriatric, Sol and Generic Luna live on here …

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

and here …

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

The two fellows in opposite corners at the top of both collages are, yes, Helios the Sun God and Mnemosyne the Moon Goddess as they looked all those centuries ago in Imperial Roman times.

(Generic Luna is sometimes erroneously called Selene. She’s not to be confused with the Silver Signaller who uses Selene as her code name, though that’s the latter day Greek goddess where she got it from.)

In terms of the Phantacea Mythos, Helios and Mnemosyne are two of its cornerstone characters, without whom there would be no such a thing. (pH-Webworld = Modern Age Mythology.) They’re the the time-tumbling Dual Entities; of whom much, much more can be found here, with even more lynx.

As for the six internal collages themselves, more on them currently links from here; double click to enlarge in a separate window. Just bye the bye, both collages have been added to the ever-growing heading banners of, you guessed it, pHantaBlog.

You can also buy the buy “Helios on the Moon“, the climactic entry of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle and, indeed, of Phantacea Phase One itself. Order online, with credit card, here or direct from the publisher here.

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Three fronts and a back

“Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ epic fantasy, is almost ready for print.

(Lynx to many excerpts from the novel, yet another breathtakingly exciting ensemble piece from Phantacea Publications, are here; more on the trilogy is here and here.)


The back cover looks and reads well but still can’t decide on front. What’s your favourite? Kindly make your choice and add a comment at bottom of page.

The front cover depicts what’s become of Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur, the onetime Unity of Order, 500 years after his last appearance in “Janna Fangfingers“. He’s advancing menacingly on the Male Entity, Heliosophos (Helios called Sophos the Wise).

The She-Sphinx, All of Incain, is beside Helios. The UNES Liberty is in lunar orbit with Planet Earth in the background. The Liiberty was mentioned in “Nuclear Dragons“. All appeared throughout ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ trilogy, but made her biggest splash in “Feeling Theocidal“.

The Dual Entities have never appeared, at least not explicitly, in any of the Phantacea Mythos novels thus far released by Phantacea Publications. They are, however, among the Cornerstone Characters in Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos (of whom much more is here).

The first front cover is as provided by the artist, Ricardo Sandoval.

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic


The second front cover incorporates the outer space background used in the mock-up used most recently on pHantaBlog here. The She-Sphinx, All of Incain, is also whiter than in other two covers.


The third front cover goes back to the first sphinx but meshes the Earth from the first and the outer space of the second.


The back cover text now reads:

The Dual Entities return to their own timeline determined to make life perfect for everyone.

Heads are bound to roll!

Scientists first detect signals coming from outer space in early 1978. Finally there is proof humanity isn’t alone. A month later, they pinpoint the source. Elation gives way to near-panic. The beams are coming from the Earth’s moon!

The United Nations’ Security Council agrees to meet this off-worldly intrusion aggressively. The result, the UNES Liberty, is already in lunar orbit when, on the Thirtieth of November 1980, the launching of the Cosmic Express takes place on the Outer Earth’s Centauri Island.

At the same time, three Great Goddesses preside over an extraordinary session of the Courtroom of the Visionary in the far off Utopia of New Weir. Meanwhile, on the Inner Earth of Sedon’s Head, the Hidden Continent’s most revered Death Gods prepare to welcome home the entirety of their fragmented family, devils almost to a one.

From the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos comes the culmination of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle. Plus, a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, the concluding novel in ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ fantasy masterpiece.

As for who’s depicted under the text on the back cover, that’s here.

Back cover, minus text, for "Helios on the Moon"; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014s

Background images for back cover of “Helios on the Moon”; text and obligatory boxes at bottom to be added; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

 

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Back Blurb Flag-Poled

Back Cover Text for “Helios on the Moon”

Don’t expect any salutes but reckon tentative-it deserves a run-up anyhow.

Text will override Ricardo Sandoval’s bas-relief figures on Helios as Sol, All of Incain, Moon Memory as Luna, the Unity of Order, Doc Defiance, Cosmicaptain Starrus, the Indescribable Mr No Name and Mnemosyne as Strife.

Comments welcome at bottom.

Back cover, minus text, for "Helios on the Moon"; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014s

Background images for back cover of “Helios on the Moon”; text and obligatory boxes at bottom to be added; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

The Dual Entities return to their own timeline determined to make life for everyone not just vastly better but perfect.

Heads are sure to roll.

Scientists first detected signals coming from somewhere out in space in early 1978. Their excitement was palpable. Finally they had proof humanity wasn’t alone in the cosmos. Then, about a month after their initial detection, the source was pinpointed. Elation immediately gave way to near-panic. The beams were coming from the Earth’s moon!

In an extraordinary session of the Security Coun­cil, the United Nations agreed to meet this off-worldly intrusion aggress­ively. The result, the UNES Liberty, is already in moon orbit when, on the Thirtieth of November 1980, the launching of the Cosmic Express takes place on Centauri Island.

At the same time, on the far off Utopia of New Weir, three Great Goddess preside over the latest session of the Courtroom of the Visionary. Meanwhile, on the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head, the Death Gods of the Frozen Lathakra prepare to welcome home the entirety of their fragmented family, devils almost to a one.

From the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos comes the culmination of the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, plus a surprising addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, the final book in ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ fantasy masterpiece.

Covers and/or splash panels reflecting action recounted in "Helios on the Moon"

Front covers for pH-2 and pH- 4Ever&40 graphic novel bracketing splash panel from pH3; artwork by Gordon Parker, 1978; Peter Lynde, 1978; and the two Ians, Fry and Bateson, 1990

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Phantacea pHits pHlickr like a … pHill in the _________

copy-pHlickrBanner_1000x300.jpgpHantaJim, blogmeister, has been keeping Ozymandias McPherson, webmeister, busy. pHan-J makes comments and provides lynx then complains bitterly that something here or there on one of the two main sites (http://www.phantacea.info/ph1.htm#phantanchor) isn’t up to snuff and Oz has to correct them.

Heck of a way to while away a summer morning. At least Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, got a new header and a promo for “Helios on the Moon” out of it.

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

– pHan-J’s latest phanta-phlickr web gallery (#4, and counting, with comments) is here.

– recent and particularly Peculiar Perspective essays on the Serendipity Now page are here and here.

– permanent placements for previous presentations on pH-Webworld are here and here.

– still waiting for offers from beta readers: http://phantacea.com/blog/?p=1045.

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