Welcome in the May-O … with Jim McPherson at the Vancouver Comicon, May 14, 2017

Winter’s Gone Away

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be behind the Phantacea Publications table at the Vancouver Comicon on Sunday the 14th of May 2017.

Welcome in the May-O. Song courtesy of Oysterband

Copies of the latest mini-novel, “Decimation Damnation” available for $10.00. Books and graphic novels: $10.00. Phantacea Four (1979): $5.00

Screen shot from the Welcoming Page of phantacea.com as of Saturday, August 4, 2016

Wilderwitch goes into labour with “Decimation Damnation”, the first mini-novel extracted from the open-ended saga

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Best Yet Borealis Brolly

Have a quote (from 2014’s “Helios on the Moon“) and a shot of the best Borealis Brolly yet

Northern lights with distinctive umbrella shape; photo attributed to Tina Tormanen, taken from Web

From Tina Tormanen’s “Magical Photos

“There still wasn’t any Gypsium to do his G-string thing. Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

“She was up there all right. Was certainly no denying she was facially Fish, albeit with an extra eye and sporting more glitter in her wardrobe than even during the years she spent as Greater Godbad’s controversial queen (by marriage, not heredity). She’d somehow grown unheard of huge, bordering on ridiculously so. Those were definitely her feet to either side of Dustmound, though. Webbed toes gave that away. So the legs and all the rest of her towering above them had to be hers as well.”

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

Here’s a link to Tina Tormanen’s highly recommended “Magical Photos“. A photo force to be reckoned with, I reckon. Contains some spectacular shots.

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Dragon’s can get eaten, too

And, as far as we know, Hiyati Samarand (the humanized form of Yati, Byron’s Dragon) is still being digested on Incain

Byron has a dragon. Last seen in Helios on the Moon (http://www.phantacea.com/hel-moon_mainpage.html) eating Sharkczar then getting swallowed whole by All of Incain, who featured predominantly in Feeling Theocidal (http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm) and showed up again in Contagion Collectors (http://www.phantacea.com/1000DazePage.htm#10SecondSyn)

Stories about dragons have always taken their inspiration from real-world animals. Does this mean dragons could feasibly exist?
bbc.com|By Josh Gabbatiss
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Phantacea Publications Some images of All can be found here (http://www.phantacea.info/term.htm#sphnxs1) and here (http://www.phantacea.info/sum14.htm#promoRow). She also appears on the cover of Helios on the Moon to Helios’s left. She’s how Freespirit Nihila escapes Sedon’s Head, howsoever temporarily. Will return as Wilderwitch’s Babies (http://www.phantacea.com/witchBabsPage.htm#logo) continues.

Phantacea Publications's photo.
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These greens aren’t edible; hopefully, they’re editable

It’s happened again. Caught it in time, this time, but still …

Artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

Helios on Moon tested at 300%. Note lack of green. That means it passed 2014 Acrobat test.

Artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014

Helios on Moon cover tested at 240%. Note the green. That means it failed. Yet it’s still available from same POD printer. Go figure.

In case you were wondering why “Decimation Damnation” didn’t come out on or about Midsummer’s Day 2016, check this out.

<<==  A year and a half ago Ricardo Sandoval produced a print cover for Helios on the Moon. It passed the 300% overall coverage test on Acrobat.

==>> Times change. It wouldn’t today because the POD company I use now requires covers must first pass a 240% overall coverage test.

Collage by Jim McPherson, 2016

Note the green. First choice cover tested at 240% failed.

Cover collage by Jim McPherson, 2016

Again, note the green. Would have failed in 2014, so back to square one.

Cover collage Jim McPherson, 2016

Cover collage initially prepared for second entry in Wilderwitch’s Babies saga “Destination Damnation”

As per here, I had to abandon my first choice print cover for DecDam. Then my craftily reworked second choice <<== did not pass the Acrobat test at 240% total overall coverage.

Small conciliation, it would not have passed the 2014 test either. ==>>

<<== So I tried out the cover I initially intended for the follow-up entry in the as yet open-ended saga of Wilderwitch’s Babies.

Cover collage originally prepared for "Destination Damnation" by Jim McPherson, 2016

Even at 300% the DestDam cover was only a borderline pass.

(Likely title, in case you were wondering, “Destination Damnation”)

It was only marginally better. ==>>

Here’s the requirement:

“When the Output Preview window is open you can move your cursor over the PDF and view the CMYK values in your file.

“This is a good time to verify that the barcode used is 100% black only and that your cover does not have large areas of color that exceed 240% Total Area Coverage.

“If concerned about excessive color density you can select the box at the bottom of the window labeled “Total Area Coverage”, select a maximum limit and all offending areas will be highlighted.”

Concerned I was; concerned I still am. But I’m submitting Revision 4 anyhow. Stay tuned. If gasket blows, well, at least I’ve got comparatively affordable medical insurance.

Cover collage prepared by Jim McPherson, July 2016

The fourth revision of the cover collage for “Decimation Damnation”. Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, July 2016

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Hacienda Morelos does its best to keep town a secret

Psst .. Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, put the finishing touches on both 2013’s “Nuclear Dragons” and 2014’s “Helios on the Moon” in Puerto Morelos, Mexico.

He’d didn’t bruit this about on any of the Phantacea websites because he mistakenly thought he was keeping the town a private delight. Guess what? It didn’t work. So much so that by the time he decided to return there this year it was packed.

He ended up staying — index fingers crossed in a warding gesture of just that, a cross — at the Hacienda Morelos. Here’s his report, as first published on the booking.com website earlier this week:

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode; the Pharaoh’s head is actually a parking shot on Giza Plateau as shot by Egyptian air force circa 1929/30; Sedon’s Head by Jim McPherson and Tim Hammell, ca 1978

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“Gorgeous setting about only good thing about Hacienda Morelos”

Situated right on a ledge above a nearly endless, soft sand, Caribbean beach that’s kept fairly clean. (Trash cans could do with more frequent dumping and the sargassum sea weed, while not as bad as last year, needs more aggressive attention.) Gorgeous view of diving and fishing boats and tenders, with the port, hence Puerto Morelos, in distance.

View from the terrace of the Hacienda Morelos after a rain storm, photo by Jim McPherson, 2016

View from the terrace of the Hacienda Morelos after a rain storm

A short walk to town square (zocala), a selection of good restaurants and a decent coffee house. One place even serves Austro-Hungarian goulash while a couple have outrageously pricey lamb. Lots of music in the bars and restaurants, though nothing at hotel, fortunately, which was quiet at night. I say fortunately because much of my stay was unfortunate.

Had to ask for towels as none were supplied at first. When I complained about the lack of hot water in shower, the desk clerk suggested I didn’t get up early enough; that everyone showers between 7 and 9 a.m., and that water containers can only heat so much.

Beach shot of Hacienda Morelos, taken by Jim McPherson, 2016

Looking up at the Hacienda Morelos as shot from the beach in February 2016 by Jim McPherson

Besides, she added, it’s usually hot, so guests don’t mind tepid shower water. (It did rain a few times and the wind was nearly constant, so not the best weather. But I was there to write and the town was down the street, so didn’t mind too much.)

Kitchen ran out of black tea after two days and never replaced stock for remaining five days. (Couldn’t find any in the local store but never checked Oxxo, the omnipresent Mexican equivalent of 7-Eleven.) The continental breakfast consisted of stale white toast, dubious pineapple marmalade, juice and either coffee or tea, read Nescafe and caffeine-free Manzanilla Chamomile. Everything else is extra.

I asked for plain yogurt and granola but they never had any granola, so they didn’t charge me. Once they substituted pink lemonade for juice and another time powdered Tang or some such. So don’t jump at offer of a free breakfast likr . Or the advertised notion that WiFi is available throughout hotel. It isn’t.

Rainbow taken at Hacienda Morelos by Jim McPherson, 2016

Shot of a rainbow taken from Hacienda Morelos terrace, image flipped horizontally.

In fact, it’s only available in the lobby or on the terrace and even then you need two separate sign-ins. Fortunately (again) I was assigned a terrace room, which was actually on the pool deck. Scuba lessons started at 8 a.m. but were usually done by 10. The doors had no screens and the room had no overhead fans. The air conditioning was so loud I shut it off. Something of a blessing, the windows that opened did have screens.

Perhaps worst of all were the pillows. They were so stuffed with foam they had no give. Instead of cushioning your head they more like bruised it. I asked for down pillows but they didn’t have any. Gave me a couple of pillows with some of the foam removed, which was better. Except one of them hadn’t been sewn up properly and I ended up with foam all over the bed, floor and me, until I noticed it. Rather than replacing it they doubled up the pillow casing.

Won’t be returning to Hacienda Morelos anytime soon. Even without the to me shocking add-on of 19% tax, it’s an overpriced shell of what once, twenty or thirty years ago, might have been a fabulous place to stay.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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pHantaBlog pHilches phrom pHacebook

Well, it isn’t exactly filching when it’s your own; rather, when it belongs to Phantacea Publications (James H McPherson, Publisher). So have a bunch of shots previously displayed on pHantacea on pHacebook as well as google+phantacea.

Card prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated since 1978

Text is by Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos. He took the pictures in Mexico City while he was there in January 2016.

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Dyana the Huntress, shot by Jim McPherson in Mexico City, January 2016

This fountain is right on the Paseo del Reforma, one of the main thoroughfares in Mexico City. Suggestive of Wilderwitch, except she usually wears clothes

‘Wilderwitch’s Babies’ will probably turn out to be two or three mini-novels long, with “Tsishah’s Twilight” either the last installment or, if expanded upon, as I’m currently leaning, a standalone novel.

Here are some Mexico City shots along with a bit of a plot summary for the first book. I’d call it ‘Decimation Damnation’ except for one thing. It gives away the whole story.

Statue of a faun groping a nymph, shot in Soumaya Museum by Jim McPherson, January 2016

Not sure who this is by but its in the Rodin area of the free Soumaya Museum in Mexico City; subtitled ‘Everyone know what fauns are good at’ by Jim McPherson, it’s a reminder that Wildman Devish Furie appears to be turning into a faun or satyr after D-Brig 4’s escape from Hadd in December 1980 (Tantalar 5980)

First of all, the titular Witch (#1) did not fare very well in “The War of the Apocalyptics“. Won’t be akin to Dyana the Huntress again for months, if ever. She’s still alive at the outset of new series, though. Has already had one child, Fey Woman, who was mentioned in that novel.

The series title is plural, not singular. Dervish Furie is infertile so that rules him out as father. He also seems to be transforming into a faun and we all know what fauns are good at. That’s #2, though that wouldn’t be the Witch pictured.

Mayan god called the Tulum Diver, photo taken in Mexico City's superb National Museum of Archaeology by JIm McPherson, January 2016

Spotted and shot in Mexico’ City superb Archaeological Museum, this statue is called the Diver. It’s originally from Tulum on the Mexican Caribbean where the deity is also known as the Descending God

She spends virtually all of the opening book either on her back being operated on in order to save her leg or in a wheelchair. Not saying if the operation’s successful, who performs it or where it’s done.

Statue of Mnemosyne, the Mother of the Muses, shot outside and up at the Palacio del Bellas Artes in Mexico City by Jim McPherson, 2016

Figure spotted and shot on the veranda out the Bellas Artes Palace in Mexico City; taken to represent Miracle Memory, the Female Entity, in the Phantacea Mythos

As recorded in “Helios on the Moon“, the Untouchable Diver disappeared during the final battle for Diminished Dustmound. #3 is actually called the Diver, though I’ve seen the same or a similar Mayan deity referred to as the Descending God.

Besides it being kind of neat, I scanned it in because he disappeared in Hadd/Iraxas and that’s where Native Americans go when they die according to one theory. Not saying if he’s back, please note.

Siqueiros Nueva Democracia, shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City by JIm McPherson, January 2016

Mural spotted and shot inside Mexico City’s Palacio de Bellas Artes. It’s by Siqueiros and taken to represent Freespirit Nihila

Right side of Camarena's Humanity Freeing Itself spotted and shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes by Jim McPherson, January 2016

Right side of Camarena’s Humanity Freeing Itself spotted and shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes; taken to represent Pyrame Silverstar with a human head and only two eyes

We already know that Wilderwitch had a mother, Miracle Memory (#4), and that she needs to be possessed in order to become human. Wilderwitch is supposed to a reincarnation of Harmony, who’s now Freespirit Nihila (#5). Guess who’s vying for Memory, along with Pyrame Silverstar (#6). Harmony and Pyrame appeared together most notably in “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

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BTW, all of these places Google, as do the murals found in the Palacio de Bella Artes. pHanta-pHans may already be familiar with some of them from the Afterword for “Feeling Theocidal“, Book One of The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories epic fantasy.

It concluded in 2012 with “Goddess Gambit“, though there was a perhaps unexpected addendum incorporated within 2014’s “Helios on the Moon“, which concluded the follow up trilogy, Launch 1980.

Didn’t conclude Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos obviously.

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

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Top of the Solstice Season, Saturnalia Salutations and/or Merry Mithramas

 Happy Xmas from deities born on or around December 25!

(Introductory Note: Xmas may come from the Greek letter X, pronounced Chi, as in the first letters of Christ. However, in the Phantacea Mythos, it comes from Xuthros Hor, the Biblical Noah. Who, on account of the Noh Theatre, looks Japanese on the cover of “Forever & 40 Days — the Genesis of Phantacea”, a graphic novel that came out in 1990.)

Got this graphic off the web after it appeared somewhere on Facebook.

Image of coins containing heads of 16 gods taken from Web.

Sixteen “mythological” gods who celebrated their birthday around the Winter Solstice

Quite a lot of these fellows (no goddesses on list), or variations thereof, appear during the course of the Phantacea Mythos.

Photo by Jim McPherson, taken in Sintra Portugal in 2008

The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, as shot by Jim McPherson, 2008, within the chapel of the highly recommended Quinta da Regaleira (where it’s called “The Flaming Triangle” for some reason) in Sintra Portugal

For example …

  1. The All-Seeing Eye of Providence, not Horus, shows up a bunch of places on the main website. Here’s one (http://www.phantacea.com/MasDevs1.htm#PyrRow); here’s another (http://www.phantacea.com/postTheo.html).
  2. Tammuz and Osiraq are the names of the Idiot or Atomic Twins who figure so devastatingly in end-game of “The Death’s Head Hellion” mini-novel (http://www.phantacea.com/pre1000.html#1idjits).
  3. Arguably, given Phantacea has always been ‘Anheroic Fantasy’, Chrysaor Attis is the central protagonist (http://www.phantacea.info/summer07.htm#AttisDescribed) in “Feeling Theocidal“. 
  4. His Great God of a devic half-father, Thyrgragos Varuna Mithras (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#ThryagMith), might be considered the novel’s main antagonist. Phantacea‘s Mithras even mocks Zoroastrian tradition here (http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#SpermAcrack).
  5. Tvasitar Smithmonger is considered the devic Prometheus. He lives in the huge, as well as hugely impressive, cyclopean structure known as the Prometheum. Also as per  “The Death’s Head Hellion“, it stands atop the cliffs overlooking the molten Brainrock, lava lake in the caldera of Sedon’s Peak (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1tavy).
  6. Finally, for now, Lazareme’s female messenger is known as Irisiel Mercherm (http://www.phantacea.com/1000characters.html#1speedy); her last name being half Hermes.
E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008

E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Additionally seems to me Adonis was mentioned during the course of ‘Feel Theo’ as one of Attis’s aspects during the 500-year era of the Goddess Culture on the Outer Earth (ca 2000 – 1500 BC).

Certainly Krishna’s girlfriend Lakshmi, even if she wasn’t nominally considered that in ancient times due to the prevalence of avatars, contributed her name to a surviving leader of D-Brig’s boo-hiss meter in the aftermath of “The War of the Apocalyptics“.

While on the topic of goddesses, Dionysus’s mother was Semele, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, variations of whom appear in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline.

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

His Cretan consort contributed her name to a character,  Ariadne Atreides, who appeared during ‘The Volsung Variations‘ web-serials of the early 2000s on pH-Webworld.

Further to this and Point 2 above, being Master Devas, Tammuz and Osiraq weren’t just twins. They were two of three. Their triplet came to be called Novadev.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

As per Feeling Theocidal, he was atomized (cathonitized, become a star in the night’s sky above the Hidden Headworld) circa 1500 BC. Did so while drinking with Phantacea  versions of that Cadmus (called Kadmon) and that Harmonia (the incomparable Harmony Unity).

Just in case you missed it in “Helios on the Moon“, or way back in 1977’s Phantacea One, Colonel Avatar Sol exploded near the moon. Miracle Memory (at least partially based on that Harmony) tells Heliosophos (who may have been that Kadmon in his second lifetime) that Sol was possessed of that Novadev.

One of the first postings on pHantaBlog was entitled “Make that Merry Mithramas“. If you need any more lynx on any of the above try the search engine atop most of the pages throughout www.phantacea.com.

Oh, yes, one of the subplots in the upcoming “Wilderwitch’s Babies” storyline has to do with efforts by the aforementioned Pyrame (Providence) Silverstar seeking to entice her forever lover, the Moloch Sedon — none other than the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky that was featured on the wraparound cover reprinted immediately below — into undoing the damage done by the Idiot Twins as per the aforementioned mini-novel “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

Wraparound cover for Phantacea Phase One #1, artwork by Ian Bateson, ca 1985

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La Marseillaise is a woman, Mr Webmeister

Here’s a funny story, sort of.

After the events in Paris on Friday the 13th of November 2015, an article appeared on the BBC Online that contains the lyrics to La Marseillaise. Some of the lyrics, albeit just in English, are also reprinted elsewhere on pHantaBlog.

Image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude's sculpture for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

Up-shot image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude’s sculpture for l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris

As is rather obvious from this photo taken from that article, the Marseillaise figure on l’Arc de Triomphe (The Triumphant Arch) in Paris is Lady Liberty. However, as below, a different take on it, as shot in the famous train station museum across the river from the Louvre, has been showing up on pH-Webworld since the mid-2000s, if not before.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

An iteration is here <==; another is just up the page (down on this one). Or you could just have a peek at the shots to the side of these paragraphs.

Point being they were used to emphasize the master-servant (more like creator-created) relationship between Heliosophos and All the invincible She-Sphinx of Incain. And Helios is resolutely male.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

Sad-sack excuse for a Webmeister didn’t even note that La Marseillaise figure was female until someone pointed it out to him years later.

Here’s bust full on ==>. The artist’s name was Francois Rude. The former railway station’s name is Musee d’Orsay. L’Arc de Triomphe googles but here’s a link to the real deal: “The Departure of the volunteers of 1792″

In fairness to oft-maligned Webmeister Oz, the sculpture shot in the museum was a bust, as in a figure from the head up. Rude apparently used it as a study before he got around to adding the full version to L’Arc de Triomphe.

The photographer didn’t make it that far up the preposterously, not to mention ostentatiously, wide boulevard from the Louvre until years later. Whereupon said error became manifest, resulting in a decidedly red face … for about minute.

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris; Rude’s study bust looked more male than female

No instructions ever came to remove bust shots from website, so there they remain. As does the Summer 2014 Serendipity entry on the same subject. Understandably entitled ‘Shelios on the Moon‘ it’s at least as funny as this blog spot.

BTW, not only is Helios determinedly male; as Ricardo Sandoval demonstrated on his brilliant 2014 cover for “Helios on the Moon“, All of Incain, shown to Helios’s left, is much better looking than Rude’s version of her.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of “Helios on the Moon”

 

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Second Comings

Coming this Sunday, Jim McPherson returns to Heritage Hall for another Vancouver Comicon: http://www.vancouvercomiccon.com/

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

Coming this winter: “Helios on the Moon” finally gets digital. Watch for more here: http://www.phantacea.com/#greetings

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

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First Winter, Last Fall — A Final McPhersonal for Year

picture of Jim McPherson, taken at Van Expo 2013 by Ed Healy

Somebody likes the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky; photo by Ed Healy of gamerati.com

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, is returning to Heritage Hall on Sunday the 8th of November to do another Vancouver Comicon. More information here, eventually.

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014.

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