Even Hirst at his Excessive Worst is better than …

Reviews were all but universally terrible but, being in Venice while the exhibit was running, at two locales simultaneously, proved too much for Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, to resist in September 2017.

Have three posts that first appeared on pHantacea on pHacebook, plus a couple of bonus shots. Commentary mostly taken from Phantacea Publications Facebook Page.

Scroll down for reiteration of images and comments …

Banner outside the entrance to the gallery, shot by Jim McPherson in Venice, September 2017

Shot in Venice, September 2017, the plaza is called the same as the gallery, Palazzo Grassi

Colossus somewhat unimaginatively called 'Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement); shot in Venice Italy by Jim McPherson in September 2017

Damien Hirst’s colossal conceit is somewhat unimaginatively called ‘Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement). Henceforth shall be referred to as Colossus

<== To the left is a shot of the banner for “Treasures from the WRECK of the Unbelievable. Damien Hirst” exhibit running in September 2017. Spotted and shot by Jim McPherson outside the Palazzo Grassi in Venice Italy.

It’s the second venue for the show but the first visited. Exhibit ran from 09/04/2017-03/12/2017

==> According to the brochure that came with admission, the image to the right (which needs a good clicking to fully appreciate its sheer, laugh-out-loud immensity) is somewhat unimaginatively called ‘Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement).

Hirst Colossus, taken from second level of Palazzo Grassi gallery by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Colossus adjusted to bring out contours better, taken from the second level of the gallery inside the Palazzo Grassi

Sooth further said, enlargement is something of an understatement. For one thing, even in the narrative it’s just (?) an outlandish copy of a much more sensibly sized golem: “It seems … the figure served as a guardian to the home of an elite person.” In ancient Mesopotamia, also according to accompanying brochure.

<== To the left is a frontal view of the supposedly Mesopotamian Colossus as taken from the second level of the Palazzo Grassi. Some tinkering with the levels on Photoshop has brought out, for the better, the demon’s contours.

Hirst's demon taken from the gallery's third level

Back shot of Hirst’s Colossus taken from the third level of the gallery and looking downward

The squiggles and encrustations are artistic conceits perhaps left in to indicate the original lay “… submerged in the Indian Ocean for some two thousand years before the site was discovered in 2008.”

==> To the immediate right is a back shot of the colossus looking down, down, down from the 3rd level of the Palazzo Grassi. Once again the conceit of the artist, not to mention the demon’s forgers, is that the original was found underwater, hence the coral and other encrustations.

Hirst's sea monster seen through window and shot by Jim McPherson in Venice, September 2017

Sea Monster seen through the window on an upper floor of the Palazzo Grassi. It appears to be rising out of the Grand Canal

<== Looking through window on an upper floor of the Palazzo Grassi in September 2017 and what does one see but a sea monster rising out of Grand Canal. Note the Ca Rezzonico palazzo on the other side. It comes highly recommended for its massive gallery of Eighteenth Century Italian artwork.

Upshot of Colossus taken by Jim McPherson in September 2017 in Venice Italy

Shot looking up at Hurst’s Colossus from the ground level

==> To the right and again looking up, way up, from the ground level is a shot put on Facebook just to see if its censors were watching.

Supposedly the Colossus was and is anatomically correct. Or at least as proportionately correct as a 60-foot bronze behemoth could be.

(Again according to the brochure, it’s a facsimile of the original, which wasn’t at the Palazzo. Might have been at the other venue, Punta della Dogana, across the Grand Canal a few stops south of the San Samuele vaporetto dock.)

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Encrusted Mickey Mouse, photo of a wall slide taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Evidently Mickey, Goofy and, yes, even a scene from Jungle Book (?) were hauled out of the depths after spending two thousand or so years submerged

<== Have to ask, if it sank nearly two thousand years ago: What’s Mickey doing on the Unbelievable? Time warp, perhaps? Could be Disney partially funded Hirst’s extravaganza and wanted some of their characters to join in the very expensive fun.

Which sounds like something only a cynical dullard would say. Sorry about that, Damien.

Shot of underwater shot of a unicorn's skull and horn, taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Supposedly an underwater shot of a unicorn’s skull and horn

==> As for the shot to the immediate right of his paragraph, is that really what’s become of the skull and horn of a unicorn after two thousand years?

Might it be a Raven’s Head type from the Phantacea Mythos? For comparison have lynx to the covers for Forever & Forty Days – The Genesis of PHANTACEA and Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade, both of which have Raven’s Head on the cover.

Underwater Colossus, shot of a shot, taken by Jim McPherson, 2017

Presumably the original Colossus taken while still submerged

<== Colossus doesn’t look quite so large in this slide. Could there be two of them? Contextually speaking it’s more likely this is the original.

Shot of a shot of an idol taken undersea with diver's bubbles, Jim McPherson, 2017

Goddess idol taken underwater complete with diver’s bubbles; suggestive of D-Brig’s Sea Goddess

In terms of the Phantacea Mythos, can’t be Catastrophe (Headless Ramazar, the Apocalyptic of Sudden Destruction, a head shot of whom shows up a cpuple of paragraphs down), from the comics and novels, notably “The War of the Apocalyptics“. Too underdressed.

==> Tempted to say the shot of a shot to the upper right represents Thalassa D’Angelo, unless it’s Thalassa Thanatos, D-Brig’s Sea Goddess, notably from the obverse cover of pH-3, artwork by Ian Bateson​ 1978.

Too bad there’s only a hint of a third eye on the sunken idol. Like the bubbles, though.

Andromeda screams as Jaws leaps out of rock to eat her, taken by Jim McPherson, 2017

Andromeda’s chained to a rock screams while Jaws leaps out of ground intent upon eating her

<== Jaws butts in on the Kraken. Andromeda doesn’t look too pleased either way.

Five covers from Phantacea comics or graphic novels, artwork by Ian Bateson except for pH-5 which Ian finished over Verne Andru's original black and white cover

Plenty more on the Phantacea Comic Book series and graphic novels can be found here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo

Wasn’t the best shot taken so darkened the background and greyed up some of the sides in hopes of bringing out characters better.

==> Something of Sea Goddess’s skinniness in Hirst’s Andromeda, too. Except D-Brig’s Sea Goddess would just state-shift into her watery element and get away instead of wasting time screaming.
As for what she could then do to either Jaws or the Kraken should she decide to come back … well, best leave that to your imagination.
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Close up of Hirst's Andromeda Screaming, part of the blue diorama based on myth of Perseus, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Andomeda is (silently) screaming so hard she turned the whole oversized diorama blue.

Diorama entitled Andromeda and the Sea Monster, shot taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Background darkened to bring out the three main characters of Andromeda, Jaws and the Kraken; the whole diorama really is blue for whatever reason

<== The elaborate diorama is not only huge it really is blue. As per shots later, and one put up last week, Andromeda really isn’t headless. She is chained, however, and does seem to have an extra hand in this shot.

==> Needs to do a Nihila and break loose pretty damn soon. Jaws and the Kraken look ravenous and could care less about social media.

Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Panharmonium, superimposed over Siqueiros's New Democracy, prepared by Jim McPherson, mid-200s

Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Panharmonium, superimposed over Siqueiros’s New Democracy (Nueva Democracia) as photographed in Mexico City’s Bellas Artes Palazio in mid-200s

<== Reference above is to what’s become of Datong Harmony as of Tantalar 5980. Google up Nueva Democracia for the unadulterated Siqueiros or just hit here: https://www.google.ca/search?q=nueva%20democracia&dcr=0…:

Demonic Head by Damien Hirst, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Severed head of a demon supposedly dredged up then cleaned prior to going on display

==> Only one mobile head in the Phantacea Mythos and that’s Bodiless Byron. He isn’t called the Unmoving One because he can’t get around — he can, by sheer force of will.

He’s called Unmoving Byron because no part of his face moves when he speaks, via a form of thought transference, through his mouthpieces … Sedona Spellbinder in The War of the Apocalyptics and APM All-Eyes in Hidden Headgames

Head supposed excavated in 1932, shot by Jim McPherson at the 'Unbelievable' exhibit in Venice,

Different shot of Damien Hirst’s demonic head. Brochure says it was excavated in the Tigris Valley back in 1932

<== Although definitely demonic I’m not sure this huge head would even fit atop the headless Colossus let alone if it really belongs there.

The accompanying brochure says it was tentatively identified as Pazuzu, a googleable Mesopotamian demon, and that it was unearthed in 1932 in the Tigris Valley. (Pazuzu had something to do with the horror movie entitled “The Exorcist”, may have even been the possessive devil who drove the girl to such head-turning extremes.)

Skull and long horn by Damien Hirst and co, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Dried out and scrubbed clean skull and horn might have belonged to a unicorn according to exhibit brochure

==> Also not sure if this really would pass for the skull and extended horn of a ravendeer in the Phantacea Mythos. Then again the exhibit’s claim that it belonged to an actual unicorn is arguably even more fanciful.

Skull and long horn by Damien Hirst and co, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Another view of a dried out and scrubbed clean skull and horn might have belonged to a unicorn according to exhibit brochure

<== Another view of the unicorn’s skull and broken horn unearthed (unwatered?) near the sunken wreckage of the Unbelievable. Skull looks like something you’d rub and expect three wishes from the genie wafting out of it.

Full wraparound cover for pH-40, artwork by Ian Fry and Ian Bateson, ca 1990

Full wraparound cover for pH-40, artwork by Ian Fry and Ian Bateson, ca 1990

NOTE:  The best in-colour, pictorial example of a ravendeer — Raven’s Head? — appears on the cover of 1990’s “Forever & 40 Days – The Genesis of PHANTACEA. Raven’s Head the character has her biggest role to date in Decimation Damnation.

In pHanta-pHact she appears in all of the 19/5980 novels and mini-novels. She even does a cameo, in her multitude, near the end of Hidden Headgames. It’s in Dec-Dam, the opening entry in Phantacea Phase Two, that she shows the petulant side of her nature.

Still encrusted 'Diver', so-called, by Damien Hirst; scanned in from a postcard bought at 'Unbelievable' exhibit in Venice, 2017

Still encrusted ‘Diver’, so-called, by Damien Hirst; scanned in from a postcard bought at ‘Unbelievable’ exhibit in Venice, 2017

<== Yehudi Cohen, D-Brig’s Untouchable Diver, is another long-serving character who reappears in Dec-Dam (after vanishing, then inexplicably, during Helios on the Moon“). He has a much more significant role than Raven in Games.

Hirst's Medusa scanned in from a postcard bought at 'Unbelievable' exhibit, September 2017

According to the brochure, among the fourteen venomous serpents represented are the African rock python, horned viper and coral snake

Have to say, though, that Hirst’s Diver, so-called, looks more female than male. Still, it’d be remiss not include it in post re treasures of the ‘Unbelievable’.

==> As for Hirst’s Medusa, the accompanying brochure claims that “fourteen of the world’s most venomous snakes … crown the Gorgon’s petrified features.”

Might have to add this one to the longtime pHanta-pHeature Medusa’s I have met.

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End post … for now!

A Photoshop collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2017, using graphics mostly taken from Web

A Photoshop collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2017, using graphics mostly taken from Web

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Best Yet Borealis Brolly

Have a quote (from 2014’s “Helios on the Moon“) and a shot of the best Borealis Brolly yet

Northern lights with distinctive umbrella shape; photo attributed to Tina Tormanen, taken from Web

From Tina Tormanen’s “Magical Photos

“There still wasn’t any Gypsium to do his G-string thing. Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

“She was up there all right. Was certainly no denying she was facially Fish, albeit with an extra eye and sporting more glitter in her wardrobe than even during the years she spent as Greater Godbad’s controversial queen (by marriage, not heredity). She’d somehow grown unheard of huge, bordering on ridiculously so. Those were definitely her feet to either side of Dustmound, though. Webbed toes gave that away. So the legs and all the rest of her towering above them had to be hers as well.”

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

Here’s a link to Tina Tormanen’s highly recommended “Magical Photos“. A photo force to be reckoned with, I reckon. Contains some spectacular shots.

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pHantaBlog pHilches phrom pHacebook

Well, it isn’t exactly filching when it’s your own; rather, when it belongs to Phantacea Publications (James H McPherson, Publisher). So have a bunch of shots previously displayed on pHantacea on pHacebook as well as google+phantacea.

Card prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

Anheroic Fantasy Illustrated since 1978

Text is by Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos. He took the pictures in Mexico City while he was there in January 2016.

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Dyana the Huntress, shot by Jim McPherson in Mexico City, January 2016

This fountain is right on the Paseo del Reforma, one of the main thoroughfares in Mexico City. Suggestive of Wilderwitch, except she usually wears clothes

‘Wilderwitch’s Babies’ will probably turn out to be two or three mini-novels long, with “Tsishah’s Twilight” either the last installment or, if expanded upon, as I’m currently leaning, a standalone novel.

Here are some Mexico City shots along with a bit of a plot summary for the first book. I’d call it ‘Decimation Damnation’ except for one thing. It gives away the whole story.

Statue of a faun groping a nymph, shot in Soumaya Museum by Jim McPherson, January 2016

Not sure who this is by but its in the Rodin area of the free Soumaya Museum in Mexico City; subtitled ‘Everyone know what fauns are good at’ by Jim McPherson, it’s a reminder that Wildman Devish Furie appears to be turning into a faun or satyr after D-Brig 4’s escape from Hadd in December 1980 (Tantalar 5980)

First of all, the titular Witch (#1) did not fare very well in “The War of the Apocalyptics“. Won’t be akin to Dyana the Huntress again for months, if ever. She’s still alive at the outset of new series, though. Has already had one child, Fey Woman, who was mentioned in that novel.

The series title is plural, not singular. Dervish Furie is infertile so that rules him out as father. He also seems to be transforming into a faun and we all know what fauns are good at. That’s #2, though that wouldn’t be the Witch pictured.

Mayan god called the Tulum Diver, photo taken in Mexico City's superb National Museum of Archaeology by JIm McPherson, January 2016

Spotted and shot in Mexico’ City superb Archaeological Museum, this statue is called the Diver. It’s originally from Tulum on the Mexican Caribbean where the deity is also known as the Descending God

She spends virtually all of the opening book either on her back being operated on in order to save her leg or in a wheelchair. Not saying if the operation’s successful, who performs it or where it’s done.

Statue of Mnemosyne, the Mother of the Muses, shot outside and up at the Palacio del Bellas Artes in Mexico City by Jim McPherson, 2016

Figure spotted and shot on the veranda out the Bellas Artes Palace in Mexico City; taken to represent Miracle Memory, the Female Entity, in the Phantacea Mythos

As recorded in “Helios on the Moon“, the Untouchable Diver disappeared during the final battle for Diminished Dustmound. #3 is actually called the Diver, though I’ve seen the same or a similar Mayan deity referred to as the Descending God.

Besides it being kind of neat, I scanned it in because he disappeared in Hadd/Iraxas and that’s where Native Americans go when they die according to one theory. Not saying if he’s back, please note.

Siqueiros Nueva Democracia, shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City by JIm McPherson, January 2016

Mural spotted and shot inside Mexico City’s Palacio de Bellas Artes. It’s by Siqueiros and taken to represent Freespirit Nihila

Right side of Camarena's Humanity Freeing Itself spotted and shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes by Jim McPherson, January 2016

Right side of Camarena’s Humanity Freeing Itself spotted and shot inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes; taken to represent Pyrame Silverstar with a human head and only two eyes

We already know that Wilderwitch had a mother, Miracle Memory (#4), and that she needs to be possessed in order to become human. Wilderwitch is supposed to a reincarnation of Harmony, who’s now Freespirit Nihila (#5). Guess who’s vying for Memory, along with Pyrame Silverstar (#6). Harmony and Pyrame appeared together most notably in “The Death’s Head Hellion“.

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BTW, all of these places Google, as do the murals found in the Palacio de Bella Artes. pHanta-pHans may already be familiar with some of them from the Afterword for “Feeling Theocidal“, Book One of The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories epic fantasy.

It concluded in 2012 with “Goddess Gambit“, though there was a perhaps unexpected addendum incorporated within 2014’s “Helios on the Moon“, which concluded the follow up trilogy, Launch 1980.

Didn’t conclude Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos obviously.

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

Three collages prepared by Jim McPherson using images taken from the Phantacea comic books and Mythos covers

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Auroral lights no Borealis Brolly

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, recently returned from his late winter, early spring brain break.

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island, artwork by Ian Bateson taken from the front cover of “Nuclear Dragons”, 2013

A brain break for him of course means a new book is on the horizon for Phantacea Publications and pHanta-pHans everywhere. At least it has in the recent past, witness “Nuclear Dragons” and “Helios on the Moon“, the long-awaited concluding entries in the Launch 1980 epic trilogy.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon, 2014

Maybe not this time; at least not in terms of ‘new’ so much as recombined.

More on that as the year progresses, though you might find a couple of mysterious additions to the Earthlings’ row in the ‘Devils by Tribal Affiliation webpage that appeared last January instructive.

For now he’s happy to report some serendipitous readings in the January 2015 edition of Fortean Times (FT 323).


Here’s something I didn’t know. According to ‘Blasts from the Past’, a column by Theo Paijmans in FT 323 (p 32; “#55: The Cities of Lost Children”), an American writer, none other than Charles Fort himself, coined the term ‘teleportation’. (Wikipedia seems to confirm that he did just that — in 1931, to be absolutely precise — here.)

This would be the same Charles Fort (1874-1932), who inspired the delightful oddballs behind Fortean Times to launch, as long ago as 1973, what’s now a regular dweller in my bin of bathroom readings. (In the same issue, Arthur C Clarke is quoted as considering forteans “… ignorant and opinionated science-bashers.”)

Nearer to the beginning of the same issue (pp 6-7), we read about something else — better make that somebody else — I’d never heard of: namely, another American, a stage-managing ‘visionary pictographer’ as much as portrait photographer by the name of William Mortensen (1897-1965).

Talk about Peculiar Perspectives, I’d provide a link re this ‘master of American Grotesque’ but don’t want to get pHantaBlog into trouble. Don’t mind getting the US edition of Huffington Post in trouble, though. So have a boo, literally.

Will say that I googled him, which was where I learned of his relationship to Cecil B DeMIlle and Fay Wray, not to mention King Kong and the Mad Hatter. Also recognized his fabulous photographic imaging of Belphegor, Hell’s perceived Prince of Sloth, among other things, including invention.

(Which begs for an entry on Phantacea and that I’ll pass on to Webmeister Oz after I’m done passing this onto  pHantaJim, Blogmeister.*)

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

Header point being yet another article in FT 323: “I Sing the Mind Electric” by Marinus van der Sluijs (pp 40-43). As a preface, recall this from “Goddess Gambit“:

“Fisherwoman wasn’t there either. Not yet. Then she was, in a way. She was bigger than life, much bigger than Diminished Dustmound … She did look good in a glowingly golden, chain-mail hauberk; no question of that. And there was nothing better against incoming missiles, no matter what they were tipped with, than teleportive Brainrock chains.”

Or this, from the aforementioned:

Young Death, as he was best known below the larger Dome, didn’t blame the Diver. He reckoned – probably correctly – that Freespirit Nihila, whom he still regarded as Fisherwoman, must be taking it [teleportive Brainrock-Gypsium] all into herself; her Borealis brolly, put better.

Or this from a few pages later:

She [Fish-Nihila] twirled it, simultaneously raising it as if a Kevlar umbrella; impermeable not just over her, but over most of Diminished Dustmound. She thus rendered it akin to a roiling, Aurora Borealis sunshade; a whirling dervish’s flaring skirts, equally so.

So, not only am I and every other writer in books, for Star Trek, and many another elsewhere, indebted to Charles Fort for the word ‘teleportation’, it seems I’m personally indebted to the magazine he inspired for this quote from van der Sluijs’s article:

“… auroral emissions also occur at ultraviolet, infrared and other wavelengths. Enunciations of a dazzling geometry of dynamic shapes are common to both near-death experiences and eye-witness accounts of aurorae. And, bizarre as it admittedly sounds, there appears to be an uncanny logic to the impression that the auroral lights contain myriad units of incorporeal consciousness exchanging information.”

There’s also this caption under a pretty picture of the Northern Lights:

“… the Aurora Borealis [is] traditionally identified as the abode of posthumous souls.”

All of which makes for quite a stunning example of serendipitous reading, especially when you consider how my recently completed brain-break-writings concluded in terms of the as yet unresolved task of “Annuling Nihila“.

The Serendipity entry’s here. And just in case you need another dose of serendipitous same, on the day Oz prepared it, the CBC Online provided some stunning shots of, well, not Fisherwoman/Nihila’s Borealis Brolly per se, but close. They’re here.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Except Nihila’s last name is not Tikels

That’s true enough. Then again, I’m not sure Freespirit Nihila has a surname. Could be Nemesis I suppose.

It’s equally true that a synonym for ‘nihilartikels’, namely ‘mountweazels’, has to qualify for word of the week. It rivals ‘omnishambles’, which appears here (http://phantacea.com/blog/), and ‘catasterize’, which is referred to here (http://phantacea.com/blog/?p=441#cata).

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

While she is fictitious, to some, and does appear in “Goddess Gambit” (http://www.phantacea.com/gambit_page.htm), the third entry in ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic trilogy, she isn’t a fictitious entry as defined in the article found here: http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/fictitious+entry

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Foreshadowing Phantacea’s Finale


Or, to fay-say it in pHant-pHorm: ‘pHoreseeing pHant’s pHinish. Maybe I should have entitled it “Freespirit Nihila take a Star Turn“. Too late now.


Here’s a statement, taken from Farlex’s Free Dictionary (which, I’m sure you’d agree, could easily be fay-said in phant-pHorm) re Nemesis:

“Nemesis is a hypothetical hard-to-see red dwarf star or brown dwarf, orbiting the Sun at a distance of about 50,000 to 100,000 AU (about 0.8-1.5 light-years), somewhat beyond the Oort cloud.”

Artist's conception of Nemesis as a red dwarf seen from a nearby debris field with the Sun visible in the center.

Artist’s conception of Nemesis as a red dwarf seen from a nearby debris field with the Sun visible in the center.


Here another statement, one that’s true for sure:

“In Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos, Freespirit Nihila is the name Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Balance as well as Panharmonium, uses once her Nemesis-persona takes over in Tantalar 5980.”

Her first appearance, in Phantacea Five, will be reprinted in the upcoming graphic novel “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the early daze of whose cover is here. She shows up throughout “Goddess Gambit” as well.

In non-real-time terms, however, she actually debuted in “Contagion Collectors“, circa Year of the Dome 5476:

Her universally admired attractiveness combined with an overstated capacity for compassion – overstated due to her seldom seen and therefore thought-fabulous, as well as ill-natured, Nem­e­sis persona – helped to make the Unity the most popular devil-god­dess of the time, if not necessarily all-time.

Later on …

Her clothing and skin was black and red and fiery orange instead of glowingly golden, butterscotch and/or transitorily dependent on the onlooker’s expectations. Her chains still had the Plates of Justice on their end but now they were serrated like a shipwright’s belt-driven buzzsaw in a stream-fed mill.

As for the wings, well, they were almost never manifest. Fletched more so than feathered, they didn’t just look like flexible, cut-anything razorblades, they probably were.

She so dominated proceedings in the aforementioned “Goddess Gambit“, she even made its front cover, thereby relegating Nergal Vetala, its titular goddess, to the back.

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

(BTW, the back cover can be seen here. Its text is here. Its teaser is here. Lynx to excerpts are here. Check out more of the graphics prepared for Gambit here. All are good. So’s the book. Highly recommended.)

5 collages prepared for the Goddess Gambit web page

A variety of collages prepared by Jim McPherson for the Goddess Gambit web page

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The article goes on to mention Sedna, an “extremely distant planetoid [that] has an extra-long and unusual elliptical orbit around the Sun, well beyond Pluto”. (BTW again, there’s piles more on Pluto here.)

Its discoverer, Mike Brown of Caltech, noted in a Discover magazine article that Sedna’s location doesn’t make sense:

“Sedna shouldn’t be there,” said Brown. “There’s no way to put Sedna where it is. It never comes close enough to be affected by the Sun, but it never goes far enough away from the Sun to be affected by other stars.”

Brown postulates that perhaps a massive unseen object is responsible for Sedna’s mystifying orbit, its gravitational influence keeping Sedna fixed in that far-distant portion of space.

Let’s see … Add an ‘o’ and there’s Smoky Sedona, Byron’s Mouthpiece, who appears in many of the novels, mini-novels, e-books and comic books put out by Phantacea Publications over the years. (The same Sedona made it to the cover of Phantacea Four in 1978.)

There’s also Lake Sedona, in which sits Sraddha Isle, the site of much of the action in “Goddess Gambit“. Its monastery also featured in the 5495 finale of “Janna Fangfingers“.

It couldn’t really be named after an Inuit goddess of the deep, dark sea either. Not in terms of the Phantacea Mythos it couldn’t. Just ask Jim McPherson about that.

As mentioned years ago in a Serendipity Now segment, take away an ‘a’ and keep the added ‘o’ and you have, of course, a different deep and dark: none other than the Moloch Sedon.

He’s one of Phantacea’s cornerstone characters. The Cathonic Zone separating the Inner from the Outer Earth is best known to those living beneath it as the Sedon Sphere.

He usually manifests himself, ever-so-impressively, as the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky and, yes, you might even consider him the main antagonist in the Phantacea Mythos.

The Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky about to slurp in the Cosmic Express; art by Ian Bateson, ca 1986/7, text and image manipulation by Jim McPherson ca 2008

The Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky about to slurp in the Cosmic Express; art by Ian Bateson, ca 1986/7; text and image manipulation by Jim McPherson ca 2008

Which is say, in many respects, he’s everyone else’s nemesis. So ask yourself this: If Sedna really shouldn’t be there, then how did it get there and when?

After all, it wasn’t discovered until 2003. Could it have been there forever or, um, might it not have been moved there sometime after, say, oh, late April 1986 perhaps?

Wouldn’t want to speculate, naturally. There is many a mention of the Soviet Supracity in the epic Launch 1980 story cycle, however. And where might it have been precisely?

As a matter of pHantacea-pHact, as per “Nuclear Dragons” it’s in the same place it was in December 1955:

There, in an already partially con­structed super city hidden in the Soviet Ukraine, they would con­tinue the quintessential work his martyred cousin, Jesus Mandam, the two years’ dead King Conqueror, left for him to complete — facilitating the hege­mony of ‘uber­mensch’, the over-man.

If he didn’t succeed where Mandam failed, the inferior, rutting rabble that made up humanity would inevitably lay to ruin the entire world with their endless wars and hideous weapons of mass destruction.

“Join me!” the Magnificent Psycho shouted into their skulls “Join our cause! It is the normal, not the supranormal, who must be subjugated.”

 

 

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