Nuclear Dragons doing a Reverse China Syndrome? Can’t be, not on 28 Sept 2015

Am struck by this shot of what … fancy fireworks?; St Elmo’s Fire? Looks like something out of Cataclysm Catalyst, albeit in colour.

(http://www.bbc.com/…/20150928-ten-strange-lights-that-appea…).

From St Elmo’s fire to sprites and blue jets, discover the peculiar glowing balls and streaks that form in Earth’s atmosphere
bbc.com|By Martha Henriques

Mention of astronomical sprites and ring-like ELVES is also kind of interesting from a peculiarly PHANTACEA perspective.

Both the ball lightning (“The Death’s Head Hellion” and the aurora borealis have long been associated with Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Balance, as well as her far less savoury alter egos, Nemesis (from “Contagion Collectors”) and Freespirit Nihila (“Goddess Gambit”, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Helios on the Moon”, all of which can still be ordered online or directly from the publisher.

 Hit the next blue highlight for lynx to all the Phantacea Mythos publications in print

Here’s the shot of Nuclear Dragons doing a China Syndrome away from Centauri Island as it appeared on the Phantacea Publications Facebook Site. The artwork’s by Ian Bateson, 1979 or 1980. It was intended for Phantacea Seven (unpublished).

NOTE: This is the re-lettered version that first saw light of print in “Cataclysm Catalyst”, webpage shot is here: http://www.phantacea.info/phpubs.htm#horsMn

Phantacea Publications's photo.
And, just in case the shot at the top of the page degrades over time, here’s a reiteration of the same image suggestive of Nuclear Dragons doing a Reverse China Syndrome away from Centauri Island in early December 1980.
Shot taken from BBC Online

Image of five shapes rocketing skyward into some sort of circular wormhole reminiscent of a scene from Nuclear Dragons, image taken from the BBC Online (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150928-ten-strange-lights-that-appear-in-the-sky)

PS, Web-meister Oz, who insists he doesn’t exist despite having 30+ Recommendations on Linked-In, used the same image for an entry on Phantacea Publications here.

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Meanwhile, on the Outer Earth of October 2015 — Harvesting Collectibles at a pHanta-pHall pHlea Market

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, 2014, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

The Vancouver Collectibles Fair happens tomorrow, Saturday, the 3rd of October 2015, at the Scottish Cultural Centre, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, shall be there under-manning, not undermining, the Phantacea Publications table. More here and here:

Scottish Cultural Centre
8886 Hudson Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Admission: $3.00

– Click here for directions to Scottish Cultural Centre –

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

From comics to novels, artwork by Ian Bateson and Verne Andru

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Prior to the Total Eclipse of Sunday’s Supermoon — Jim McPherson’s doing VPL’s Word Vancouver

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the the Phantacea Mythos, will be tending the Phantacea Publications table at VPL’s Word Vancouver this Sunday. The show lasts from 11 am until 5 pm, so plenty of time to come by (buy) before total lunar eclipse of Supermoon that we get to see starting around 7pm.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

pHantaTable is in the Alice McKay Room on the lower level inside the main VPL branch downtown at West Georgia and Homer. Website is here: www.wordvancouver.com; program guide, which contains a map of the site on pages 34 & 35, is here: issuu.com/wordvancou…/docs/word_vancouver_2013_program_guide

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

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Sea Silk for Sea Goddess

Guess what Fisherwoman is going to be wearing the next time she appears in a Phantacea Publications’ release, which may well be the next Phantacea Publications’ release?

Then again maybe this is what Sea Goddess is putting on in this detail taken from pH-4, artwork by Ian Bateson, 1979

Ian Bateson artwork circa 1979 for pH-4, modified by Jim McPherson, 2013 4sea_hagfish

Page excepted from pHRv1:DB; Sea Goddess finds something more suitable to wear after 25 years in Limbo

If it’s still online, hit the next blue highlight for the complete BBC Magazine article on Sardinian Sea Silk. Some rather interesting historical notes made therein. Here’s a sample:

Sea Silk is … “an ancient thread, known as byssus, which is mentioned on the Rosetta stone and said to have been found in the tombs of pharaohs.

“Some believe it was the cloth God told Moses to lay on the first altar. It was the finest fabric known to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, and one of its remarkable properties is the way it shines when exposed to the sun, once it has been treated with lemon juice and spices.”

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk, taken from the BBC Magazine online

Uncredited shot of a Sardinian woman stretching sea silk

Apparently it comes from a clam, though equally amazingly the clam is unharmed by the extraction.

Reminds me of a long ago, maybe even long lost, pHantaBlog entry that featured these shots of hagfish slime:

hagfish_66661087_2012-12-1818.25.48

Shot of someone holding up translucent slime from a hagfish from an article in BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime, taken from BBC Magazine online 1 April 2013

Shot of a woman holding up hagfish with translucent slime from BBC Magazine 1 April 2013 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21954779)

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Come 27 September 2015, the Word on the Street is Phantacea

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

Suffering from aphantacea or a deepening desire to add to your thickening trove of PHANTACEA products?

Jim McPherson, the creator-writer of the Phantacea Mythos, shall be manning the Phantacea Publications table at Vancouver’s Word on the Street book fair in and around the VPL’s Library Square on Homer Street on Sunday, 27 September 2015.

Click baby blue highlight for details regarding PHANTACEA Mythos print publications.

Virtually all of this material will be available at extraordinary shows-only prices of $10.00 per novel and/or graphic novel, plus $5.00 per mini-novel and/or original Phantacea comic books (while supplies last).

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

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Cure(s) for Aphantacea at Vancouver Collectibles Fair, 3 Oct 2015

BBC online has had a couple of pieces on aphantasia lately. It’s been described as a someone missing their mind’s eye (Missing one’s Mind’s Eye). Here’s a sure cure for apHantacea, besides the usual.

Phant’s pHavourite snake oil salesman is welcoming in the last month of the Harvest Season by inviting you to join him at the Vancouver Pop Culture Collectibles Fair & Computer Swap Meet on Saturday, October 3, 2015.

Website, with directions, is here: October Collectibles Fair. Scroll down page for familiar shot of said snake oil salesman. Note the bold type:

Details regarding PHANTACEA Mythos print publications can be found here: http://www.phantacea.com/DotComMenu.htm#publications.

Virtually all of this material will be available for purchase at extraordinary con-only prices of $10.00 per novel and graphic novel, plus $5.00 per mini-novel and original Phantacea comic books (while supplies last).

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

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Helios on the Moon comes down to Earth — again

Vancouver Comic Show promo for 7 June 2014

Jim McPherson will be attending the 4th show this Sunday, 7 June 2015

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be a guest at this Sunday’s VANCOUVER COMIC & TOY SHOW #4: http://canadiancomics.net/.

Being a guest has its privileges so he’ll also be manning a full table containing just about everything still available for purchase from Phantacea Publications.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of Helios on the Moon

Some showy prices, too. $10.00 each for many of the full-length novels and all three graphic novels, $5.00 (bags included) for original comics from the 1970s (Phantacea 1-4 only), $5.00 for a couple of the mini-novels. Not to be beaten with a stick … or anything else, por favor.

It’s at Vancouver’s Croatian Cultural Centre, 16th and Commercial, from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. Admission is $5.00. Go to the Canadian comics site and scroll down for, surprise, surprise, an authorized shot of, um, the author.

In order to avoid offending the eye, and thus necessitating it having to be plucked out, it’s about the only photo he allows to be seen in public places besides the bottom of one of his sandals on his personal Facebook page.

Promo prepared for upcoming release of Helios on the Moon by Jim McPherson, 2014

Double-click to enlarge; the better to read if you do. Artwork is from the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels.

Cover artwork for “Helios on the Moon” (the full-length, multiple character, mosaic novel that in effect marks the culmination of Phantacea Phase One) is by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014.

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

In the Launch 1980 promo, artwork from the cover of the graphic novel, “Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade“, is by Ian Bateson, 2012, whereas artwork from the latest graphic novel, “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst“, is by Verne Andru, 2014.

Jim McPherson prepared the graphic, the full version of which also features cover art from “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons” by Ian Bateson as well as a reiteration of the front cover art for “Helios on the Moon” by Ricardo Sandoval.

The graphic below was prepared by Jim McPherson from a photo he took of the Sun (Helios called Sophos the Wise) and Moon (Miracle Memory) kissing in 2012 in Puerto Morelos, Mexico. They’re two of the Cornerstone Characters in the Phantacea Mythos.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon-Kissing wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2012; taken to represent the time-tumbling Dual Entities during happy times

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Helios on the Moon exposed at long last

Jim McPherson, the creator-writer of the Phantacea Mythos, shall be manning the Phantacea Publications​ half-table at Heritage Hall this Sunday, 22 March. It’s the first Vancouver Comic Con of the year, so how can you miss it?

Even more importantly, he’ll have with him fresh-off-the-press copies of “Helios on the Moon“, the culminating novel in the Launch 1980 story cycle, as well as the three Phantacea graphic novels and first four comics from the original series.

The Vancouver Comic Con’s website is here. The address for Heritage Hall is:

3102 Main Street
(Main & 15th Avenue)
Vancouver BC

Poster for March Comic Con at Heritage Hall

Jim McPherson shall be there with “Helios on the Moon”

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All-American Gun Porn – Shot in Vancouver

pHantaBlog NOTE: Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, doesn’t do confessionals. He does McPhersonals. Sometimes they’re rants. Fortunately those are few and far between.
That said, here’s another:

 

 Screen Psychos Purportedly of the Superhero Persuasion

Have to admit that, with the exception of a few Green Lantern collections, it’s going on a quarter century since I last bought a superhero comic book. Sooth additionally said, though I’ve produced a couple of my own latterly, albeit of the anheroic variety and not always supranormally populated, I’ve purchased only a couple of dozen, if that, graphic novels in that time and them mostly to give away as presents.

I still love the comic book medium, do most of my shows at comicons, and spend most of my fiction-reading time immersed in the fantasy genre. However, like most folks, I get the majority of my superhero fix watching television. And most of that is on what we in Canada know as the CW network, a couple of which also show up on MuchMusic, SPACE and Showcase.

CW combines the first letters of CBS and Warner in its logo; they’re the network’s corporate backers. I gather it targets a mostly male audience, though its predecessors, WB and UPN, did manage to produce Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Star Trek: Voyager, which weren’t just for nerdy men IMHO.

I first came across CW because it showed Smallville and Supernatural. Since both series were made in and around Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, I got an extra visceral kick out of identifying the locales of various scenes. I gave up on Supernatural once it got religion a number of years ago, but have often started watching a series just because it shot locally.

Some didn’t last, mostly because they weren’t very good. (No names please, we’re Canadian.) Then again some did last despite the fact they weren’t very good. (Ditto.) To my mind a few successes or semi-successes that came and went include the aforementioned Smallville, Battlestar Galactica, Sanctuary, Continuum and the various Stargate incarnations.

Three that are with us today are Arrow, The Flash and The 100. Ask me, each and every one of these last are gun porn.

So the Arrow has turned over a new leaf. He’s not going to kill anymore. Rather, he’s not going to kill anyone anymore with arrows. Send him to some Caribbean hot spot — more opportunities for even more skin — and he’ll happily kill with a gun, though, and by the dozen.

He jokes(?) about it: “I never said I couldn’t use guns, just that I didn’t.” Then, since today’s heroes have to be NRA-approved killers at heart, there are flashback sequences wherein he’s some sort of assassin working for the Suicide Squad’s head honcho, unless it’s honchess.

Over in The Flash, Weather Wizard and Multiple Man get shot dead, both casualties of lazy writing. How else can you end a TV show featuring superheroes except biblically? Can’t put them in jail on account of they’re so awfully powerful they’ll just escape and that would never do.

And I do mean awfully, as in awful. Captain Cold is a heartless, mass murderous, career criminal. He seemingly uses regular guns, as well as a gadget gun, for no other reason that super-villains in the USA have to be, you know, irredeemably evil in order to qualify for our hero’s invariably reluctant attention.

Heat-Wave, or whatever his name is going to be, is no doubt on the way. Maybe he won’t use a gun but, boy, I bet you can CGI some truly gruesome burns these days. My only hope is he melts bullets so the producers will have to come up with a better way to dispose of him.

A flash flood, perhaps, ha-ha. Make that a tsunami. Should provide a super-spectacular, season (if maybe not series) ending finale. Look out, Downtown Vancouver. You may have survived the end of Arrow’s first season – or was that Chinatown? – but The Flash promises to fix you up good and proper this time.

Hopefully it’ll cost him a couple of his (not so) terrific team members. But, hey, that’s what’s bound to happen to loyal, howsoever good-looking, not to mention goody-two-shoes, cannon fodder. There’s always more where they came from; ones cut from the same mould, too, from the looks of them.

Got to find work for a few visible minorities in this enlightened day and age don’t you know.

Speaking of a second Great Flood, how about The 100? True, its ending was nuclear, not watery; rather, its beginning was nuclear. But its setting is post Apocalypse. So is that of Falling Skies, which is also shot in Vancouver: post-apocalyptic, though its end-beginning is/was alien invasion.

Their characters – if that isn’t a misnomer – aren’t superheroes per se, at least not yet, but their antics are definitely intended to be super-heroic. Plus, there’s a superfluity of gun porn common to both … and gratuitous torture … and untrustworthy adults, baby baby-boomers for the most part … and beautifully buff, young people who wear tatters very stylishly.

Over-wear tatters, put better, since their underwear always appears very well, um, maintained; not to mention uplifting, designed to flatter. Very impressive in the mud and blood, tats and persistent scarring departments, too. Quality makeup, if nothing else.

Which is also what they are character-wise — nothing else, least of all interesting. Or, to be less dismissive, how about wooden, humourless, and oh, ever so sincere. Which means they hug a lot, either before of after they go on a killing spree, fancy weaponry blazing loud and rapidly.

Good thing there’s no more shortage of ammunition in post-apocalyptic times than there is of supportive smalls, to use a strange George RR Martin word I’d never come across before Game of Thrones. Must make the NRA as happy as End-of-Days Evangelicals.

No time to get going on Hellraiser or Dominion or Gotham or Grimm, though the latter two are still on my PVR list. They’re not shot in Vancouver but that won’t stop me from rave, rage, ranting about them at some other time should the urge hit.

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Helios on the Moon Press Release

Poster to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes cover from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle, prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Poster prepared to accompany Helios on the Moon press release; utilizes covers from both Phantacea Revisited graphic novels and the three full-length novels making up the Launch 1980 story cycle

PRESS RELEASE                                                   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jim McPherson’s long term project to novelize the Phantacea comic book series culminates with “Helios on the Moon”

VANCOUVER, BC: “Helios on the Moon”, the climactic entry in the ‘Launch 1980’ story cycle, doesn’t just pick up where its predecessors, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragons”, left off. It fills in the blanks they left behind, then blazes onto its own startling conclusion of Phantacea Phase One.

A multi-character extravaganza that’s cosmic in scope, yet very much earth-centric, it takes off with the Cosmic Express on the Thirtieth of November 1980, veers to the far-off planetary Utopia of Weir then, finally, rages back to both sides of the Whole Earth ten days and many lost lives later.

This is the rest of the stunning storyline only touched on during the two Phantacea Revisited graphic novels: “The Damnation Brigade” and “Cataclysm Catalyst”. With a surprise addendum to “Goddess Gambit”, Book Three of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic trilogy, this is the rest of the story as it happens on the Moon, beyond and, indeed, below it.

And if you think Jim McPherson’s Phantacea Mythos is only going through a phase, you’re right. But what a fantastic phase it is.

For more information contact:

Phantacea Publications
74689 Kitsilano RPO, 2768 West Broadway, Vancouver BC, V6K 4P4
Primary website: http://www.phantacea.com

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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