Even Hirst at his Excessive Worst is better than …

Reviews were all but universally terrible but, being in Venice while the exhibit was running, at two locales simultaneously, proved too much for Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, to resist in September 2017.

Have three posts that first appeared on pHantacea on pHacebook, plus a couple of bonus shots. Commentary mostly taken from Phantacea Publications Facebook Page.

Scroll down for reiteration of images and comments …

Banner outside the entrance to the gallery, shot by Jim McPherson in Venice, September 2017

Shot in Venice, September 2017, the plaza is called the same as the gallery, Palazzo Grassi

Colossus somewhat unimaginatively called 'Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement); shot in Venice Italy by Jim McPherson in September 2017

Damien Hirst’s colossal conceit is somewhat unimaginatively called ‘Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement). Henceforth shall be referred to as Colossus

<== To the left is a shot of the banner for “Treasures from the WRECK of the Unbelievable. Damien Hirst” exhibit running in September 2017. Spotted and shot by Jim McPherson outside the Palazzo Grassi in Venice Italy.

It’s the second venue for the show but the first visited. Exhibit ran from 09/04/2017-03/12/2017

==> According to the brochure that came with admission, the image to the right (which needs a good clicking to fully appreciate its sheer, laugh-out-loud immensity) is somewhat unimaginatively called ‘Demon with a Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement).

Hirst Colossus, taken from second level of Palazzo Grassi gallery by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Colossus adjusted to bring out contours better, taken from the second level of the gallery inside the Palazzo Grassi

Sooth further said, enlargement is something of an understatement. For one thing, even in the narrative it’s just (?) an outlandish copy of a much more sensibly sized golem: “It seems … the figure served as a guardian to the home of an elite person.” In ancient Mesopotamia, also according to accompanying brochure.

<== To the left is a frontal view of the supposedly Mesopotamian Colossus as taken from the second level of the Palazzo Grassi. Some tinkering with the levels on Photoshop has brought out, for the better, the demon’s contours.

Hirst's demon taken from the gallery's third level

Back shot of Hirst’s Colossus taken from the third level of the gallery and looking downward

The squiggles and encrustations are artistic conceits perhaps left in to indicate the original lay “… submerged in the Indian Ocean for some two thousand years before the site was discovered in 2008.”

==> To the immediate right is a back shot of the colossus looking down, down, down from the 3rd level of the Palazzo Grassi. Once again the conceit of the artist, not to mention the demon’s forgers, is that the original was found underwater, hence the coral and other encrustations.

Hirst's sea monster seen through window and shot by Jim McPherson in Venice, September 2017

Sea Monster seen through the window on an upper floor of the Palazzo Grassi. It appears to be rising out of the Grand Canal

<== Looking through window on an upper floor of the Palazzo Grassi in September 2017 and what does one see but a sea monster rising out of Grand Canal. Note the Ca Rezzonico palazzo on the other side. It comes highly recommended for its massive gallery of Eighteenth Century Italian artwork.

Upshot of Colossus taken by Jim McPherson in September 2017 in Venice Italy

Shot looking up at Hurst’s Colossus from the ground level

==> To the right and again looking up, way up, from the ground level is a shot put on Facebook just to see if its censors were watching.

Supposedly the Colossus was and is anatomically correct. Or at least as proportionately correct as a 60-foot bronze behemoth could be.

(Again according to the brochure, it’s a facsimile of the original, which wasn’t at the Palazzo. Might have been at the other venue, Punta della Dogana, across the Grand Canal a few stops south of the San Samuele vaporetto dock.)

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Encrusted Mickey Mouse, photo of a wall slide taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Evidently Mickey, Goofy and, yes, even a scene from Jungle Book (?) were hauled out of the depths after spending two thousand or so years submerged

<== Have to ask, if it sank nearly two thousand years ago: What’s Mickey doing on the Unbelievable? Time warp, perhaps? Could be Disney partially funded Hirst’s extravaganza and wanted some of their characters to join in the very expensive fun.

Which sounds like something only a cynical dullard would say. Sorry about that, Damien.

Shot of underwater shot of a unicorn's skull and horn, taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Supposedly an underwater shot of a unicorn’s skull and horn

==> As for the shot to the immediate right of his paragraph, is that really what’s become of the skull and horn of a unicorn after two thousand years?

Might it be a Raven’s Head type from the Phantacea Mythos? For comparison have lynx to the covers for Forever & Forty Days – The Genesis of PHANTACEA and Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade, both of which have Raven’s Head on the cover.

Underwater Colossus, shot of a shot, taken by Jim McPherson, 2017

Presumably the original Colossus taken while still submerged

<== Colossus doesn’t look quite so large in this slide. Could there be two of them? Contextually speaking it’s more likely this is the original.

Shot of a shot of an idol taken undersea with diver's bubbles, Jim McPherson, 2017

Goddess idol taken underwater complete with diver’s bubbles; suggestive of D-Brig’s Sea Goddess

In terms of the Phantacea Mythos, can’t be Catastrophe (Headless Ramazar, the Apocalyptic of Sudden Destruction, a head shot of whom shows up a cpuple of paragraphs down), from the comics and novels, notably “The War of the Apocalyptics“. Too underdressed.

==> Tempted to say the shot of a shot to the upper right represents Thalassa D’Angelo, unless it’s Thalassa Thanatos, D-Brig’s Sea Goddess, notably from the obverse cover of pH-3, artwork by Ian Bateson​ 1978.

Too bad there’s only a hint of a third eye on the sunken idol. Like the bubbles, though.

Andromeda screams as Jaws leaps out of rock to eat her, taken by Jim McPherson, 2017

Andromeda’s chained to a rock screams while Jaws leaps out of ground intent upon eating her

<== Jaws butts in on the Kraken. Andromeda doesn’t look too pleased either way.

Five covers from Phantacea comics or graphic novels, artwork by Ian Bateson except for pH-5 which Ian finished over Verne Andru's original black and white cover

Plenty more on the Phantacea Comic Book series and graphic novels can be found here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo

Wasn’t the best shot taken so darkened the background and greyed up some of the sides in hopes of bringing out characters better.

==> Something of Sea Goddess’s skinniness in Hirst’s Andromeda, too. Except D-Brig’s Sea Goddess would just state-shift into her watery element and get away instead of wasting time screaming.
As for what she could then do to either Jaws or the Kraken should she decide to come back … well, best leave that to your imagination.
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Close up of Hirst's Andromeda Screaming, part of the blue diorama based on myth of Perseus, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Andomeda is (silently) screaming so hard she turned the whole oversized diorama blue.

Diorama entitled Andromeda and the Sea Monster, shot taken by Jim McPherson, September 2017

Background darkened to bring out the three main characters of Andromeda, Jaws and the Kraken; the whole diorama really is blue for whatever reason

<== The elaborate diorama is not only huge it really is blue. As per shots later, and one put up last week, Andromeda really isn’t headless. She is chained, however, and does seem to have an extra hand in this shot.

==> Needs to do a Nihila and break loose pretty damn soon. Jaws and the Kraken look ravenous and could care less about social media.

Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Panharmonium, superimposed over Siqueiros's New Democracy, prepared by Jim McPherson, mid-200s

Datong Harmonia, the Unity of Panharmonium, superimposed over Siqueiros’s New Democracy (Nueva Democracia) as photographed in Mexico City’s Bellas Artes Palazio in mid-200s

<== Reference above is to what’s become of Datong Harmony as of Tantalar 5980. Google up Nueva Democracia for the unadulterated Siqueiros or just hit here: https://www.google.ca/search?q=nueva%20democracia&dcr=0…:

Demonic Head by Damien Hirst, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Severed head of a demon supposedly dredged up then cleaned prior to going on display

==> Only one mobile head in the Phantacea Mythos and that’s Bodiless Byron. He isn’t called the Unmoving One because he can’t get around — he can, by sheer force of will.

He’s called Unmoving Byron because no part of his face moves when he speaks, via a form of thought transference, through his mouthpieces … Sedona Spellbinder in The War of the Apocalyptics and APM All-Eyes in Hidden Headgames

Head supposed excavated in 1932, shot by Jim McPherson at the 'Unbelievable' exhibit in Venice,

Different shot of Damien Hirst’s demonic head. Brochure says it was excavated in the Tigris Valley back in 1932

<== Although definitely demonic I’m not sure this huge head would even fit atop the headless Colossus let alone if it really belongs there.

The accompanying brochure says it was tentatively identified as Pazuzu, a googleable Mesopotamian demon, and that it was unearthed in 1932 in the Tigris Valley. (Pazuzu had something to do with the horror movie entitled “The Exorcist”, may have even been the possessive devil who drove the girl to such head-turning extremes.)

Skull and long horn by Damien Hirst and co, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Dried out and scrubbed clean skull and horn might have belonged to a unicorn according to exhibit brochure

==> Also not sure if this really would pass for the skull and extended horn of a ravendeer in the Phantacea Mythos. Then again the exhibit’s claim that it belonged to an actual unicorn is arguably even more fanciful.

Skull and long horn by Damien Hirst and co, shot by Jim McPherson, 2017

Another view of a dried out and scrubbed clean skull and horn might have belonged to a unicorn according to exhibit brochure

<== Another view of the unicorn’s skull and broken horn unearthed (unwatered?) near the sunken wreckage of the Unbelievable. Skull looks like something you’d rub and expect three wishes from the genie wafting out of it.

Full wraparound cover for pH-40, artwork by Ian Fry and Ian Bateson, ca 1990

Full wraparound cover for pH-40, artwork by Ian Fry and Ian Bateson, ca 1990

NOTE:  The best in-colour, pictorial example of a ravendeer — Raven’s Head? — appears on the cover of 1990’s “Forever & 40 Days – The Genesis of PHANTACEA. Raven’s Head the character has her biggest role to date in Decimation Damnation.

In pHanta-pHact she appears in all of the 19/5980 novels and mini-novels. She even does a cameo, in her multitude, near the end of Hidden Headgames. It’s in Dec-Dam, the opening entry in Phantacea Phase Two, that she shows the petulant side of her nature.

Still encrusted 'Diver', so-called, by Damien Hirst; scanned in from a postcard bought at 'Unbelievable' exhibit in Venice, 2017

Still encrusted ‘Diver’, so-called, by Damien Hirst; scanned in from a postcard bought at ‘Unbelievable’ exhibit in Venice, 2017

<== Yehudi Cohen, D-Brig’s Untouchable Diver, is another long-serving character who reappears in Dec-Dam (after vanishing, then inexplicably, during Helios on the Moon“). He has a much more significant role than Raven in Games.

Hirst's Medusa scanned in from a postcard bought at 'Unbelievable' exhibit, September 2017

According to the brochure, among the fourteen venomous serpents represented are the African rock python, horned viper and coral snake

Have to say, though, that Hirst’s Diver, so-called, looks more female than male. Still, it’d be remiss not include it in post re treasures of the ‘Unbelievable’.

==> As for Hirst’s Medusa, the accompanying brochure claims that “fourteen of the world’s most venomous snakes … crown the Gorgon’s petrified features.”

Might have to add this one to the longtime pHanta-pHeature Medusa’s I have met.

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End post … for now!

A Photoshop collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2017, using graphics mostly taken from Web

A Photoshop collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2017, using graphics mostly taken from Web

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40th Anniversary McPhersonals for Nov 2017

Advisement for Nov 5, 2017 Comicon

Advisement for Nov 5, 2017 Comicon. Note the 4th name in red. He’ll be there manning the Phantacea Publications table

Side blurb for VanExpo 2017

Jim McPherson will be there manning the Phantacea Publications table next to Captain Cannabis in Artists Alley

To help mark the 40th Anniversary of the Phantacea Mythos in print, its creator/writer, Jim McPherson, will be manning the Phantacea Publications tables at the November 5th Vancouver Comicon and the long weekend Nov 10-12 Van Expo.

He’ll have with him copies of 1977’s Phantacea One at both cons. It features 32-pages of pre-Cerebus Dave Sim artwork, complete with a wraparound cover and an easily removed plastic bag. Cost for the complete packet is $25.00. Copies of pH-2, 3, & 4 will also be available for a cons special price of $5.00 each. Plastic bags optional.

pH-1 back cover, 1977, artwork by Dave Sim, created, written and published by Jim McPherson, September 1977

Characters include Doc Defiance, the Emperor Mammalian, Devil Wind, Mik Starrus and Dr Nightingale, artwork by Dave Sim, 1977

Front cover for pH-1, artwork by Dave Sim, 2017; created, written and published by Jim McPherson, 1977

Artwork by Dave Sim, more on pH-1 here: http://www.phantacea.com/#1cov and here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#pH1

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Forget the Fantasy Photo, Meet Phantacea’s creator/writer on Sunday, 18 June, in Vancouver

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, will be at the Creators Table on Sunday, 18 June 2017, selling and signing Phantacea Publications comics, graphic novels, novels and mini-novels. $8.00 admission

Poster for Biannual Comics Show, June 2019

Poster for Biannual Comics Show, June 2019

Biannual Comics Show, Croatian Hall, Vancouver: http://www.canadiancomics.net/

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Still no sign of Psycho — except on the Simpsons

Well, it worked last time up, so let’s try another …

Haven’t watched anything on Fox, not even football, for decades. Still this really is Psycho. Which is also the name of a Phantacea Mythos character, albeit as a brain in a box, last seen in “Nuclear Dragons“.

Having, thanks to his sister, Aranyani Nightingale, who first appeared nearly forty years ago in Phantacea 1 (September 1977, see back cover shot of Aran and a few others as drawn by Dave Sim way back then) avoided becoming a light snack, he’ll be back in quest of the rest of his body whenever “Destination Damnation” gets published.

“Hidden Headgames” will come out before it, though, later in year.

Seems there isn’t a handy shot of Psycho Saul Ryne from the PHANTACEA comic book series readily available. Remind with a comment below and there soon will be.

 

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Merry Mithramas Bonus … Boxed on Boxing Day

Perhaps not surprisingly the Mithramas update of Serendipity and … isn’t so much about devils and their devilments in the Phantacea Mythos, though it is that. Its main purpose is to show off some nifty optical diableries from the 1870s and tell pHantaJIm‘s true story re receiving an email from Mephistopheles in the mid to late 1990s.

Also contains reiterations of a couple of Dave Sim pages from pH-1 (1977) and a cut-out of a Frank Frazetta so obscure it didn’t google up online. Ended up having to scan it in from a picture book that precedes Phantacea.

Oh yes, entry contains some actual diablerie stereoscope shots as well. Have some sample artwork

1870s diablerie scanned in from Fortean Times #346

Uncoloured diablerie from 1870s entitled Les Cuisines de Satan, used to illustrate Baaloch Hellblob’s gourmand tastes

Fat potentate and his executioner, Frank Frazetta artwork, undated

Scanned in from “The Fantastic Art of Frank Frazetta”, Bantam Books, US Edition August 1975

Stereoscopic diablerie from 1870s entitled, in English, ‘Entrance to Hell

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Vexatious Nonentities?

Wash that birdbrain’s mouth out with soapstone

Was going to use the word ‘nebbishes’ but online dictionary objected (wrongly, as it happens) but even when it’s defined as “a pitifully ineffectual, inept, and timid person” it still implies they exist.
As this telltale sequence from “Decimation Damnation” reveals, that’s not necessarily so in the case of Stone Gnomes:
The girls had been terrified of Dervish Furie, with his horns and fangs, but had taken an immediate liking to Jervis Murray, he with his darkish, though not altogether jet-black skin and still thick but now trimmed beard. They were in charm mode; were competing with each other trying to tell him how matter transducers kept working despite the fact no one in Cabalarkon knew how to make, let alone service, one anymore. He was distracted, was forever looking around for Wilderwitch, who had yet to show up, and missed most of what Harry’s youngest, Athena, was saying.
“What was that again, Tina? What’re stone gnomes?”
“Gnomes made of stone, silly,” the 6-year old repeated.
“They’re what keeps everything going, Uncle Monster,” elaborated 12-year old Helen, who liked to sound superior and could be quite rude. “Tinny thinks she saw one this morning in the old palace.”
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Which, since she thought she saw it in a refrigerator while ‘stealing’ ice cream as well as for those of you don’t follow Phantacea Publications on Facebook (pHantacea on pHacebook), brings us to this, a variation of which also appeared recently on Serendipity and …:

A mite nippy out there, eh? And not just in the dying days of what’s been passing for summer in Vancouver. Great start, though … in May.

Phantacea Publications's photo.
Phantacea Publications's photo.
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 And this, also from (pHantacea on pHacebook):

Is that a stone gnome on the cover of JLA 15?

Image may contain: 1 person
Neither of which tells us that stone gnomes actually exist. Something does, though, hence — hopefully without giving too much away — this sequence, also from DecDam:
Wilderwitch was still silently cogitating … when they arrived at Raven’s digs. She wasn’t as swift as Johnny or Raven were to realize the walls were no longer the mess she and Furie had made of them; were in fact back to being as good as new. Was barely swift enough to pick up on the significance of Raven’s exclamatory squawks. Wash that birdbrain’s mouth out with soapstone she was thinking when Sundown made another observation.
“And if they’re demons, they’re shape-shifters.”
“Wait a minute there,” the Witch protested. “You’re suggesting I’m a demon?”
“Not at all,” said Sundown, regarding her querulously, through Raven’s eyes and with her perspective. “Should we have been?”
“Of course not. What were you saying then? I must have missed it.”
“Only that stone gnomes must have fixed the walls and stone gnomes have to be demons. Demons are shape-shifters.”
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Much more on Stone Gnomes can be found by using the search engines on www.phantacea.com and pH-Webworld
Screen shot from the Welcoming Page of phantacea.com as of Saturday, August 4, 2016

Wilderwitch goes into labour with “Decimation Damnation”, the first mini-novel extracted from the open-ended saga

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Did Lord Lazee morph into Sinistral Sloth

As much as I like Round Robin in the middle of the top row, note the bottom right cover. Lord Lazee? Could he be related to Sinistral Sloth of Satanwyck, a Phantacea Mythos character scheduled to return in “Destination Damnation” (‘DesDam’), the second mini-novel in the open-ended saga of ‘Wilderwitch’s Babies’?

(The first mini-novel in the saga is still on track for a release, at least in PDF form, this summer {June 2016}. It’s still called “Decimation Damnation” {‘DecDam’} and it still needs a cover, though.)

Six superhero covers from Harvey Comics in the 1960s

Six superhero covers from Harvey Comics as taken from pHantacea on pHacebook

Re Lord Lazee, here’s a blow up of the cover that sparked the sublimation query made above.

Blow up of Jack Q Frost superhero comic cover from mid-60s, artist uncredited

Jack Q Frost attacks Lord Lazee, artist unlisted, note the fiery demons

The biggest problem with identifying him as Sinistral Sloth of Satanwyck is that Sloth’s equivalent of Lazee’s little devils are notoriously flammable. Of course there could be fiery demons down there in Sedon’s Temple but, if so, D-Brig 3 haven’t come across them in DesDam as yet. That might change in the editing phase to come of course.

BTW, Sinistral Sloth’s Illuminary-given name in the Phantacea Mythos is

Baaloch Hellblob. He’s  called ‘Blob’ at least as often as Lord Lazy even though sheer laziness is his attribute.

Transparent enlargement of Lord Lazee's devils, artist unknown

Satanwyck’s Demons are notoriously flammable; evidently not so Lord Lazee’s little devils

Ditto, as per here, Domdaniel-Pride, Lady Lust, Santa Mammon (aka Sinistral Avarice) and so on. All but Arisandesam the Conquering Worm (aka Sinistral Gluttony) play roles in DesDam.

So too does Bobby Badboy, that envious little sprite or cupid (for Cupidity), who has already played a role in “Contagion Collectors“. He was (what else?) the putrid putto hanging out with Herta Heartthrob in Nuremberg when the latter, a biomage-made demon, abducted the ill, hence highly contagious, boy Dire, age 6, and his loyal dog, a dachshund named Drang.

There’s more on DecDam here and here.

Hasankyef House Head Given Eyes by Jim McPherson in 2008; shot taken in Turkey, 2003

Hasankyef House Head Given Eyes by Jim McPherson in 2008; shot taken in Turkey, 2003

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Orgasmatron — Bad Rhad’s Theme Song

Don’t know if Motorhead’s Lemmy (Ian Kilmister, 1945-2015) and band mates were writing about Bad Rhad when they wrote, and he sang, ‘Orgasmatron‘ for their 1986 album of the same name but one here-familiar writer reckoned he was: http://www.phantacea.info/summer05.htm#BadRhadWantsAll .

Phantacea Publications's photo.

“Orgasmatron”

I am the one, Orgasmatron, the outstretched grasping hand
My image is of agony, my servants rape the land
Obsequious and arrogant, clandestine and vain
Two thousand years of misery, of torture in my name
Hypocrisy made paramount, paranoia the law
My name is called religion, sadistic, sacred whore.

I twist the truth, I rule the world, my crown is called deceit
I am the emperor of lies, you grovel at my feet
I rob you and I slaughter you, your downfall is my gain
And still you play the sycophant and revel in you pain
And all my promises are lies, all my love is hate
I am the politician, and I decide your fate

I march before a martyred world, an army for the fight
I speak of great heroic days, of victory and might
I hold a banner drenched in blood, I urge you to be brave
I lead you to your destiny, I lead you to your grave
Your bones will build my palaces, your eyes will stud my crown
For I am Mars, the god of war, and I will cut you down.

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Bad Rhad was known as Rhadamanthys as well as Smiler during the initial PHANTACEA comic book series of the late Seventies, appearing on the cover for pH-6.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst", the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Nearly thirty-five years later, Verne Andru took his original and improved on it, in almost every respect, for the cover of “Cataclysm Catalyst.”

Bad Rhad appears as a pivotal character in “Feeling Theocidal” and “Goddess Gambit“. (Verne Andru did both of those covers as well.) Therein he’s often called the Judge but, as per here, doesn’t object when he’s equated with Ahriman.

A character called Bad Rhad actually shows up in Feel Theo. He’s a panpipes-playing ne’er-do-well whom George Tethys’s mother, Master Helena Somata, she of the ages’ old Weirdom of Kanin City (after Cain, Slayer of Abel), considers a bad influence on her precious son.
(If you have to know, Georgie’s the Emperor Constantine’s half-brother in the Phantacea Mythos. He’s also an incarnation of Jordan Tethys.)
However, since Smiler can’t be remembered unless he’s standing right in front of you and wills you to see him, who’s to say if that Bad Rhad and PHANTACEA‘s Rhadamanthys are one and the same. Well, a certain here-familiar writer might be able to tell you but he probably wouldn’t.
Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode

Business card used by Jim McPherson when in Phantacea mode; the Pharaoh’s head is actually a parking shot on Giza Plateau as shot by Egyptian air force circa 1929/30; Sedon’s Head by Jim McPherson and Tim Hammell, ca 1978

(Or, as far as that goes, Tomcat Tattletail during the three mini-novels comprising ‘The 1000 Days of Disbelief‘. Like Bad Rhad the panpipe player, Tomcat only has two standard human eyes. Devils are of course shape-shifters.)
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NOTE 1: The Cretan Rhadamanthys was a son of Europa and Zeus. Along with brother Minos he became a Judge of the Dead. As interesting as that may be, that isn’t why Smiler’s called the Judge. It’s because it rhymes with Druj (meaning ‘The Lie’ in Zoroastrianism.)

Demonic train cover for Motorhead Orgasmatrom 1986

Cover for 1986 album by Motorhead. No art credit given; taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Orgasmatron.jpg

NOTE 2: The third brother was named Sarpedon. The Sarpedon Underclass of Cabalarkon’s Weirdom played minor roles in “The Death’s Head Hellion“. As pure blood Utopians, the Summoning Child twins Demios, who’s black, and Melina Sarpedon, who’s white, are members of that selfsame underclass.

NOTE 3: A coyote character named Squirrelly Tethys smiles suspiciously throughout the D-Head mini-novel. Could be he’s the then latest stolen identity of the aforementioned Tomcat Tattletail, who plays on the incomparable Harmony’s heartstrings throughout ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ epic fantasy trilogy as released by Phantacea Publications from 2008-2010.
NOTE 4: Motorhead’s album was produced by Bill Laswell. Its front cover (above right)  features a demonic train. It’s only got two eyes, though, so probably not inspired by the never-remembered Smiling Fiend.
Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Second Comings

Coming this Sunday, Jim McPherson returns to Heritage Hall for another Vancouver Comicon: http://www.vancouvercomiccon.com/

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

Coming this winter: “Helios on the Moon” finally gets digital. Watch for more here: http://www.phantacea.com/#greetings

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

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First Winter, Last Fall — A Final McPhersonal for Year

picture of Jim McPherson, taken at Van Expo 2013 by Ed Healy

Somebody likes the Mighty Eye-Mouth in the Sky; photo by Ed Healy of gamerati.com

Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, is returning to Heritage Hall on Sunday the 8th of November to do another Vancouver Comicon. More information here, eventually.

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014.

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