Feel Theo at the Tate Britain

Well, not literally, but close.

Harryhausen's Perseus Strangling Medusa, photo taken in the Tate Britain by Jim McPherson, 2017

Perseus using his shield as a mirror in order to avoid looking directly at the Medusa. Shades, once again, of “Feeling Theocidal” , though it didn’t happen exactly that way when he, a deviant, tangled with his devic half-dad, a Great God, at the end of Feel Theo. Looks like the Amateramirror, with the Susasword on the ground . — taken at the Tate Britain by Jim McPherson in late August 2017

Harryhausen's Pegasus, taken at the Tate Britain by Jim McPherson, 2017

Chrysaor Attis, from “Feeling Theocidal“, was known as the Universal Soldier, but he was also many of the heroes of mythology, including Perseus. At least he was according to the Phantacea Mythos. He called his ride ‘Peg‘.  Not very imaginative of him but, hey, when you’re a product of imagination you can’t expect to have much of one yourself. — taken by Jim McPherson at the Tate Britain in late August 2017.

A lot of 2008’s “Feeling Theocidal“, Book One of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories epic trilogy, was at least partially inspired by the Perseus cycle of myths.

In pHantacea-pHact its deviant protagonist, Chrysaor Attis, who was born circa 2000 BCE on the Inner Earth of Sedon’s Head, was once Perseus himself.

He rode a pterippus by the name of Peg, not Pegasus. He wielded the Six Great Godly Objects including a golden sword known as the Susasword and a shield-cum-mirror known as the Amateramirror.

Like their sister object, the Crimson Corona, which causes the Untouchable Diver no end of trouble in “Hidden Headgames”, they shone with the telltale glow of Brainrock when in use.

What isn’t as well known in terms of Greek Mythology is their connection not only to each other but to Medusa herself:

Chrysaor was the brother of the winged horse Pegasus and son of Poseidon and the Gorgon Medusa. When Medusa was decapitated by Perseus, both Chrysaor and Pegasus were born at the same time. Little is known about Chrysaor; he was considered a stout-hearted warrior, and his name means “he who bears a golden sword”.

… from Chrysaor – Greek Mythology (https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Creatures/Chrysaor/chrysaor.html)

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Another model of Medusa made by Ray Harryhausen and shot in the Tate Britain by Jim McPherson, 2017

Harryhausen’s Medusa, a model for his 1981 film ‘Clash of the Titans’. The model’s behind glass. The painting in background is John Martin’s “Great Day of his Wrath”. Phantacea’s Medusa (Mater Matare, from “Feeling Theocidal“, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and the comic books did not have a serpentine tail. More re pHant’s Medusas here: shot at Tate Britain by Jim McPherson in late August 2017.

Harryhausen's Medusa, shot by Jim McPherson at the Tate Britain, 2017

Close up of one of Harryhausen’s Medusa models. Again it was behind glass, but still looks nasty.

Don’t recall if this was mentioned in Feel Theo but do recall that Attis’s half-parents were the time-tumbling Dual Entities (Heliosophos and Miracle Memory) whereas his devic half-parents were Thrygragos Varuna Mithras and his Ewe for Aries Fitna Marutia (also Kanin Marut, Kore-Discord).

{She grew up (down?) to become none other than Strife, a possessive ‘virus’ last seen in “Nuclear Dragons“, the second entry in the epic Launch 1980 fantasy trilogy.}

One of Harryhausen's sketches of Scylla, photo by Jim McPherson, 2017

Harryhausen’s version of Scylla. As per “Hidden Headgames”, Aortic Merthetis gave the future Fisherwoman that as a first name when she found her, a newborn, in the Belly of the Beast (Island Leviathan) in 5918 Year of the Dome. In terms of our time count that’s almost a hundred years ago now. The eye-stalks are called ommatophores. John Sundown ended up wearing a pair near the end of “Decimation Damnation“. They were a trap. Rather, they were intended to be a trap for him. More here re that.

Isn’t much of an assumption to suggest Attis was named by the Entities, who being from the (then) future knew their myths. Had even lived one, his Second, as Phoenician-born Cadmus, founder and long-serving king of Grecian Thebes.

(Heliosophos, the Male Entity, believed he was in his Seventh Lifetime around 2000 Year of the Dome, our 2000 BC. His time as Cadmus, also brother of Europa, hence the continent’s name, took place 500 years later, around 2500 YD, our 1500 BC. Time-tumblers do that sort of thing.)

Somehow doubt Ray Harryhausen would have known about the Phantacea Mythos when he did ‘Clash of the Titans‘ in 1981, though Phantacea One did come out in 1977. (As boldly stated on its front cover, the release of “Hidden Headgames” marks the {gulp!} 40th anniversary of the Phantacea Mythos in print.)

Still, with these shots, it’s hard to ignore the connection. All the more so when Pyrame Silverstar, another of the main devic characters in Feel Theo is about to make a big time return to the print canon with the release, later on this month, of said “Hidden Headgames”.

Model of a skeletal warrior by Ray Harryhausen, shot in Tate Britain by Jim McPherson, 2017

Model of a skeletal warrior prepared by Ray Harryhausen for his film, 1981’s Clash of the Titans. Note the Medusa head on its shield. It’s a skeletal gorgon. Taken by Jim McPherson at the Tate Britain in August 2017

Pyrame’s hardly the only familiar pHace to pHanta-pHans who’s back in Games. Sooth as always said, at least on pHantaBlog, virtually everyone who appears in Games has done so before.

Tate Placards re Harryhausen Exhibit, taken by Jim McPherson, 2017

Placards quoting Harryhausen re his sketches of Charybdis and Scylla

That includes the fabulous, ever-fishifying Fisherwoman, whose birth name was Scylla Nereid. As also per “Goddess Gambit” and towards the end of “Decimation Damnation“, unless you’re a fan of monsters she’s vastly better looking than Harryhausen’s Scylla.

Still, yet again, when you walk into a free show at the Tate Britain, in August 2017, barely a couple of months before Games is due to go on sale, you not only have to start shooting (photographs) you have to do a pHantaBlog on a few of them.

So have a few more to finish. Have to say, as a last word, the bronze looks more like his Charybdis than his Scylla.

Harryhausen Bronze nominally of his Scylla, taken at Tate Britain, 2017

Looks more like his sketch of Charybdis. Since Arisandesam, the Conqueror Worm, once Sinistral Gluttony of Satanwyck, has a brief mention in “Hidden Headgames” might use in future to represent him/her.

Placard quoting Harryhausen, taken by Jim McPherson at the Tate Britain, 2017

Note Harryhausen’s explanation as to why ‘Force of the Trojans’ was never made

Harryhausen's sketch of Charybdis, taken by Jim McPherson at the Tate Britain, 2017

Harryhausen’s sketch of Charybdis, made as part of a pitch for a movie tentatively entitled ‘Force of the Trojans’ that never got made

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