So why isn’t it called Attismas?

On pHantacea on pHacebook, December 19, 2015, there is this note under the entry expanded upon in a separate pHantaBlog entry here:

“Something similar can be found here: http://listverse.com/…/10-christ-like-figures-who…/…. Don’t know anything about Glycon but Zarathustra and Attis appear with some background info. The comments about Dionysus vis-a-vis Christ are, um, intriguing.”

Have now looked up Glycon and discovered, among other things, that it’s a brand name for metformin, an antidiabetic agent used for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus; as monotherapy when hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) cannot be managed with diet and exercise alone.”

Glycon Rumanian Serpent God, image taken from Web

Serpent God worshipped in Black Sea area of what’s nowadays Rumania, where this statuette was found

Which rang a bell, for a couple of altogether disparate reasons. Neither of which is what the post, without any corroborative lynx, says about Glycon:

In the middle of the 100s AD, out along the south coast of the Black Sea, Glycon was the son of the God Apollo, who: came to Earth through a miraculous birth, was the Earthly manifestation of divinity, came to earth in fulfillment of divine prophecy, gave his chief believer the power of prophecy, gave believers the power to speak in tongues, performed miracles, healed the sick, and raised the dead.

Seems Glycon (metaformin) is not derived from from goat’s rue, a kind of Goan curry that I  seem to recall was, despite its name, quite tasty when I visited Goa, India, for a week or so in 2005. Instead the goat’s rue it derives from is a kind of pea also known as French lilac.

Has been making headlines of late, however. One of them is: World’s first anti-ageing drug could see humans live to 120. Plus, according to Wikipedia, world renowned, self-described lazy, comic book writer Alan Moore “… has declared himself a devotee of Glycon.”

Attis taken from Web

Bust taken from web of Phrygain Attis. Note the Liberty Cap or Freedom Hat. It became a symbol during the French Revolution

Admittedly neither has anything to do with Attis. However, for what it’s worth, this does:

“Attis was born on December 25 of the Virgin Nana. He was considered the savior who was slain for the salvation of mankind. His body as bread was eaten by his worshippers. He was both the Divine Son and the Father. On “Black Friday,” he was crucified on a tree, from which his holy blood ran down to redeem the earth. He descended into the underworld. After three days, Attis was resurrected.

Note the picture taken from the post then compare it to the next shot as found on the Louvre’s Website. It’s supposed to be of Mithras, who in PHANTACEA, is the Attis’s father.

For good reason, I’d say.

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Mithras slays the bull, image taken from web

Plenty more on Taurus Chrysaor Attis here, here and via the three-site Search Engine atop either of those pages. Earlier blog posts re Solstitial Saviours are here, here and here.

8 collages against the back drop of the Louvre's Dual Entities

The Dual Entities are two thousand years old. The ‘Launch 1980’ collages were prepared in 2014. Details and double-click enlargements of most of them can be found on the Phantacea Publications Welcoming Page: http://www.phantacea.com/#graphics

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