La Marseillaise is a woman, Mr Webmeister

Here’s a funny story, sort of.

After the events in Paris on Friday the 13th of November 2015, an article appeared on the BBC Online that contains the lyrics to La Marseillaise. Some of the lyrics, albeit just in English, are also reprinted elsewhere on pHantaBlog.

Image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude's sculpture for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

Up-shot image taken from BBC Online of part of Francois Rude’s sculpture for l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris

As is rather obvious from this photo taken from that article, the Marseillaise figure on l’Arc de Triomphe (The Triumphant Arch) in Paris is Lady Liberty. However, as below, a different take on it, as shot in the famous train station museum across the river from the Louvre, has been showing up on pH-Webworld since the mid-2000s, if not before.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

An iteration is here <==; another is just up the page (down on this one). Or you could just have a peek at the shots to the side of these paragraphs.

Point being they were used to emphasize the master-servant (more like creator-created) relationship between Heliosophos and All the invincible She-Sphinx of Incain. And Helios is resolutely male.

Bust spotted in the Muses d'Orsay ca mid-90s, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris

Bust spotted in the Muses d’Orsay, shot by Jim McPherson while in Paris. At the time he believed it reminiscent of Heliosophos and All of Incain, a couple of major players in his Phantacea Mythos

Sad-sack excuse for a Webmeister didn’t even note that La Marseillaise figure was female until someone pointed it out to him years later.

Here’s bust full on ==>. The artist’s name was Francois Rude. The former railway station’s name is Musee d’Orsay. L’Arc de Triomphe googles but here’s a link to the real deal: “The Departure of the volunteers of 1792″

In fairness to oft-maligned Webmeister Oz, the sculpture shot in the museum was a bust, as in a figure from the head up. Rude apparently used it as a study before he got around to adding the full version to L’Arc de Triomphe.

The photographer didn’t make it that far up the preposterously, not to mention ostentatiously, wide boulevard from the Louvre until years later. Whereupon said error became manifest, resulting in a decidedly red face … for about minute.

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris

The Departure of the Volunteers as it appears on l’Arc de Triomphe in Paris; Rude’s study bust looked more male than female

No instructions ever came to remove bust shots from website, so there they remain. As does the Summer 2014 Serendipity entry on the same subject. Understandably entitled ‘Shelios on the Moon‘ it’s at least as funny as this blog spot.

BTW, not only is Helios determinedly male; as Ricardo Sandoval demonstrated on his brilliant 2014 cover for “Helios on the Moon“, All of Incain, shown to Helios’s left, is much better looking than Rude’s version of her.

Artwork from front cover of "Helios on the Moon" by Ricardo Sandoval; promo prepared by Jim McPherson, 2014

Helios, with his ‘holocaster’, and the She-Sphinx (All of Incain) , with Thunder and Lightning Lord Yajur (Lord Order) sneaking up on them; artwork by Ricardo Sandoval taken from front cover of print version of “Helios on the Moon”

 

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Not so marvelous Marseillaise

Just in case you’re tempted to break out in rousing defiance by singing the Marseillaise on your street corner, best recall what you’re belting out ever so robustly:

Do you hear, in the countryside
The roar of those ferocious soldiers?
They’re coming right into your arms
To cut the throats of your sons, your women!

France’s national anthem will be sung by English as well as French fans at Wembley. What’s the story behind the song?
bbc.com
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Second Comings

Coming this Sunday, Jim McPherson returns to Heritage Hall for another Vancouver Comicon: http://www.vancouvercomiccon.com/

Collage prepared by JIm McPherson, 2014, utilizing artwork by Verne Andru and Ricardo Sandoval

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2015, made up of Ricardo Sandoval space backdrop and female sphinx from the cover of “Helios on the Moon”, plus Verne Andru’s Freespirit Nihila, 2012, and old King Cold, 1980

Coming this winter: “Helios on the Moon” finally gets digital. Watch for more here: http://www.phantacea.com/#greetings

Front and back artwork by Ricardo Sandoval, 2014; text and layout by Jim McPherson

Potential covers, with spine, for Helios on the Moon, the multiple character, 2014 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that concludes the Launch 1980 fantasy epic

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