Feeling Archival

Front Cover Ad for "Nuclear Dragons", art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Front Cover Ad for “Nuclear Dragons”, art by Ian Bateson, 2013, text and ad preparation by Jim McPherson, 2013

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

Publisher got an email from India recently. Correspondent wanted free copies of “Goddess Gambit” and the first two entries in the ‘Launch 1980’ trilogy*, “The War of the Apocalyptics” and “Nuclear Dragoons“.

(*Launch 1980 = Jim McPherson’s currently only two-thirds completed project to novelize the comic book series. The last one, “Helios on the Moon“, should be coming out this Spring.)

Promise was to review the books for Goodreads. However, having checked out cost of shipping books to India ($20.00 per book surface, meaning by boat, expected delivery 2 months), publisher declined.

Correspondent persisted so publisher agree to send off Gambit, his favourite. (Writer’s favourite as well, despite someone once saying it was for aficionados of the weird and wild, or words to that effect.

Full Cover for "Goddess Gambit", artwork by Verne Andru 2011/12

Full Cover for “Goddess Gambit”, artwork by Verne Andru 2011/12

At any rate, publisher found this in archives. It was a long-prior-to-publication blurb for “Feeling Theocidal“, the first full-length Mythos novel ever published. Have a boo.

Jim McPherson’s PHANTACEA Mythos

Devils, Demons, Dates and suchlike Diverse Details

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007; for more hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#MitRuptNot1

Thanks in large measure to monotheistic religions the Gods and Goddesses, the Demons and Monsters, of Antique Mythology have been trivialized, their worship proscribed and the entities themselves confined to another realm. This realm is known by various names. In some folk traditions it is called the ‘Otherworld’, in others ‘Shadowland’, and to this day in places like Tibet it is often referred to as the Inner Earth.

In the PHANTACEA Mythos it goes by all these names and a number of others, most prominently Big Shelter and the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head. That it’s been hidden since the time of the Great Flood of Genesis (the ‘Genesea’), take that as a given. That it’s hidden by the Cathonic Zone or Dome, that’s reflected in how its inhabitants count time: in Years of the Dome (YD). The sub-titular Thrygragon of “Feeling Theocidal” occurs in 4376 YD. That makes it 376 AD: four thousand three hundred and seventy-six years after the Genesea subsided.

There are a great many supernatural entities living beneath, or within, the Dome. I make a distinction between ‘Cathonic’ or skyborn and ‘Chthonic’ or earthborn beings. The latter include such familiar creatures of folklore as faeries and demons while the former are the Fallen Angels or devils of the Bible. With respect to devils, because they are described as fallen I take that to mean they are extraterrestrial in origin. To a number of the Earth-centric, Mother Goddess worshipping characters in the PHANTACEA Mythos that makes them less supernatural than unnatural and, hence, their enemy.

Collage entitled Great Gods Going Crazy, prepared by Jim McPherson, ca 2007

Collage prepared by Jim McPherson for Phantacea Publications, ca 2007; for more hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/dEvilGods.htm#MitRuptNot1

I also refer to devils as being members of the ‘devazur’ race since, to simplify matters some­what, ‘devas’ or ‘devs’ in Indian or Kurdish tradition are gods whilst my azuras or their ‘asur­as’ are demons. Yet, in the Zoroastrian tradition of the neighbouring Persians, the opposite holds true. (In fact I’ve been given to understand that the word ‘ahura’, from whence come azura and asura, just means lord or lady, depending on the context.) All in all, then, it just made sense to combine the two into devazur.

It is my contention that the Sanskrit word ‘deva’ is the root for English words such as devil, deity, divine, diva, and the Indian honorific, Devi. It seems to me that the Latin word for God, ‘Deus’, is just a variation of ‘dev’. This appears self-evident when you consider that in English the plural of ‘dev’ is ‘devs’ and the Romans wrote ‘Deus’ as ‘devs’.

Three tribes constitute the devazur race. These are the Mithradites, the Byronics and the La­zar­emists. They are named after the tribes’ (nominal) male primogenitors: Thrygragos Varuna Mithras, Thrygragos Byron and Thrygragos Lazareme.

As for their three female primogenitors, they are, or were, the Trigregos Sisters: Sapiendev the Mind, Demeter the Body and Devaura the Spirit. Except in flashbacks, they don’t feature in “Feeling Theocidal”. However, their terrible talismans definitely do.

And will as the PHANTACEA Mythos progresses. That’s why the novel’s also called: “The Thrice Cursed Godly Glories – Book One”.

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E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008
E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008; Feel Theo’s web page is here:
http://www.phantacea.com/FeelTheoPage.htm#BlownUpCover

Note: Much of the above material was taken from the Moloch Manoeuvres webpage (http://www.phantacea.info/molmyth1.htm#contents). Lynx to tons more information on the PHANTACEA Mythos can be found on www.phantacea.com’s long-running progenitor: pH-Webworld.

Check out its features page (http://www.phantacea.info/ph1.htm#logo), main menu (http://www.phantacea.info/ph2.htm#logo) and terms pages (http://www.phantacea.info/term.htm#logo) for starters.

Written ca 2005/6 as an intro to the “Feeling Theocidal” manuscript then going through the submission process. There’s a Travels essay from 2005 re Jim McPherson’s one and only trip to India here.

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The Glitch that stole Mithramas

Title page for "The Soldier's Trilogy, Part II: Cataclysm Catalyst" taken from Phantacea Four; artwork by Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Title page for “The Soldier’s Trilogy, Part II: Cataclysm Catalyst” taken from Phantacea Four; artwork by Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Collage featuring the Glaubert torc and three panels from pH-4, artwork by Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Unearthed in early to mid 1990s; in Phantacea terms, could be confused with either Harmony’s necklace or the Crimson Corona; artwork from pH-4, Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Mithramas came and went with Kitty Clysm neither under the tree nor in the can (read ‘computer’).

New Years did too, though at least the cover got finished a few days before the Big Ball Descending wherever and whenever, local time.

Then the Glitch stole the last hope Jim McPherson had of writing “The Proof is Out There” before March.

It’s not … because of the dastardly Glitch.

Preview of a work in progress, artwork for the wraparound cover for "Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst", Verne Andru, 2013

Preview of a work in progress, artwork for the wraparound cover for “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst”, Verne Andru, 2013

At 144 mb, the PDF for Kitty Clysm’s innards proved simply too large for designated POD-printer’s upload system. Plus, the promised 48-hour response time to the Publisher’s plea for help has come and gone without so much as an acknowledgement of receipt.

As is commonly said in Pirate Movies: Arggh!

As slight compensation here’s a copy of the finished cover, albeit in greyscale (also seen here, here and here).

Black and white rendition of Kitty Clysm cover, art by Verne Andru, 2013

Bad Rhad’s at it again in this black and white rendition of the wraparound cover intended for “Phantacea Revisited 2: Cataclysm Catalyst”

RSS pHantaBlog for next update re Kitty Clysm’s fate. Earlier blog entries containing sample artwork from Kitty Clysm can be found on “Fat-eared Helios time-tumbles to Glauberg for 101st“, which is here, and “Super Fecundity — Make that pHecundity“, which is here.

 

 

 

 

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Super Fecundity — Make that pHecundity

Helios on the Moon - comic book cover; art by Richard Sandoval 1978

Helios on the Moon – comic book cover; art by Richard Sandoval 1978

Title page for "The Soldier's Trilogy, Part II: Cataclysm Catalyst" taken from Phantacea Four; artwork by Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Title page for “The Soldier’s Trilogy, Part II: Cataclysm Catalyst” taken from Phantacea Four; artwork by Verne Andrusiek, 1979

Jesus Mandam gets mentioned a few times in “Nuclear Dragons” and probably will again in “Helios on the Moon“. His supposed twin Barsine appears in both “Goddess Gambit” and “Cataclysm Catalyst“, albeit not so much so by daddy-given-name.

So does her son Thartarre Holgatson, which should give you a hint as to who she appears as. Hint 2: Who she appears as was around in “Feeling Theocidal“, which is set in (4)376 AD, but Barsine wasn’t born until December 25, 1920.

E-book cover for "Feeling Theocidal", artwork by Verne Andru, 2008

E-book cover for “Feeling Theocidal”, artwork by Verne Andru, 2008;

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit”

Jesse and aka Bar-Stool (or Bat-Bait, in the pH-Webworld serials of a decade past now) didn’t look at all alike. The explanation in the Web Wheaties (serials = cereals, not surreal) is that, as soon as they were born, Witches of Weir deliberately mixed up girls procreated during the Simultaneous Summonings of 19/5920.

But could they have actually come out of the same womb? Apparently it is possible, though not very likely: See super-fecundation and/or hetero-paternal fecundation here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superfecundation.

Oh, and guess who was often called Fecundity in “Feeling Theocidal“?

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Cryoseism — Catastrophe comes to Temporis

Here’s a sequence from “The War of the Apocalyptics”. It’s also quoted here.

Cover for E-Versions of "The War of the Apocalyptics", artwork by Ian Bateson

E-Pox now available on the Kindle platform

Just to set the scene, Old Man Power  (before he realizes he’s actually Kronokronos Akbarartha) has unwittingly sent Nakba Ramazar to Subcranial Temporis in the north of Sedon’s Head. (For future reference, the map’s here whereas an entry for Temporis is here.)

Aka Catastrophe, the Headless Apocalyptic of Sudden Destruction, he’s now trying to convince Akbar’s devic half-father, Dand Tariqartha, to let him remain in the latter’s protectorate until Devauray (Saturday) night. Being an Apocalyptic, not to mention headless, and hence rather simpleminded, he’s offering to destroy some of the Thousand Caverns if the Dand doesn’t let him stay.

‘… we’ve copious quanti­ties of capital calamities to other-offer you.” Ramazar pulled a flip pad out of the breast pocket of his highwayman-style over­coat. He also pulled out a pair of spectacles. After a second’s hesita­tion he returned the glasses to his pocket.

“Don’t know why I keep those things around.” he mumbled, flip­­ping open the notebook. “Haven’t got a nose to perch them on nor the eyes to see through, have I?”

“So it would appear, yet you speak and have no mouth. How do manage that?”

“Promise not tell anyone, Dand the Dandy Deadbeat Dad, and I’ll let you in on our scintilla of a secret.”

“Upon my inviolable oath as a highborn son of Lazareme, migh­tiest of the Great Gods.”

“Two-be-headed Vultyrie’s a ventriloquist.”

“And here I thought she was just a mindless schlemiel.”

“That too. Now, where was I? Oh yes, disasters. Where else would I be? Haven’t done any limnic eruptions for a coon’s age – or a hundred and thirty years, whichever’s greater – but I don’t see any deep cool lakes saturated with carbon dioxide in the immediate vicinity. I do see wood­lands, though, and a shell I was sharing recently read that fire­storms are very popular in California these days. Know where California is?”

“As a matter of fact I’ve filled a number of caverns with Califor­nia seemings down through the ages. Hollywood, mid to late 59-teens is my favourite.”

And  so it goes. The up-shoot of these howsoever nonsensical formalities (for devils) is that Tariqartha permits Ramazar to stay until Saturday night. The non-fantasy aspect of why Ramazar never got around listing cryoseism as an optional disaster is mostly because the writer had never heard of frost quakes before today.

‘Frost quakes’ wake Toronto residents on cold night

Weather phenomenon caused by ice expanding in the ground

(CBC Online: Jan 03, 2014 7:02 AM ET)

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