Belatedly Noted: Nuck Drags Recommended (for reading, not smoking, though they are hot)

Seems Stevo recommended “Nuclear Dragons“,  the second entry in the Launch 1980 story cycle, way back in December 2013. Seems also pHantaJim, Blogmeister didn’t find out about it until today:

Front cover for Nuclear Dragons, artwork by Ian Bateson, 2013; banner at top added by Jim McPherson, 2014, for digital versions of the novel

Crystallion leads Hell’s Horsemen against Centauri Island


Stevo’s Monthly Picks (Read-Only Folder)  –  December Book Recommendations (182 views): http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1/messages?msg=189.1

Nuclear Dragons by Jim McPherson, creator/writer, and Ian Bateson, cover artist (Phantacea Publications, $20.00)

The Launching of the Cosmic Express took place on Centauri Island at the end of November 1980. It was destroyed … Or was it? No matter. Its destroyers thought it was. And they’re not done yet.

Who or what can stop them? The Menace on the Moon? Silver-armoured Signal System? Supra-Clones? Loxus Abraham Ryne, the eighty year old head of SPACE (‘The Society for the Prevention of Alien Control of Earth’)? A couple of middle-aged, newly-minted supranormals named Doc Defiance and Mr. No Name?

A twenty-seven year old who neither knows who his parents were nor what an Amoeba Man was? An obesity who knows far more than he should but is disinclined to share that knowledge with anyone, not even his own son? Or maybe, just maybe, a notorious little trickster who has been seven years old for something like sixty years!

Truth told: How can anyone stop Nuclear Dragons!

(Also in the series: “The War of the Apocalyptics”)


Stevo also recommended “Goddess Gambit” but pHantaJIm heard about that not all that after when it came out.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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Stevo gets graphic — Belatedly noted recommendation for “The Damnation Brigade”

Seems Stevo recommended “The Damnation Brigade” graphic novel way back in December 2013. Seems also pHantaJim, Blogmeister didn’t find out about it until today:

Covers for Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade

Graphic novel compiles the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from pH 1-5 as well as pHz1 #s 1 & 2; for more on the Phantacea comics hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo


Stevo’s Monthly Picks (Read-Only Folder)  –  December Book Recommendations (182 views): http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1/messages?msg=189.1

Phantacea Revisited Volume One: The Damnation Brigade by Jim McPherson, et al. (Phantacea Publications, $12.95

This graphic novel is a compilation of the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from Phantacea 1-5 (1977-1980), Phantacea Phase One #1 (1987) and #2 (unpublished). The cover is by Ian Bateson, 2012, with some additional contributions by Chris Chuckry on the front cover.

Artists include Dave Sim, from just before Cerebus the Aardvark, Ian Bateson, Verne Andru (420, Captain Canuck), George Freeman (Captain Canuck) and Vince Marchesano (Orb).

Jim McPherson wrote the War of the Apocalyptics, a full-length Phantacea Mythos novel based on these stories.


Stevo also recommended “Goddess Gambit” but pHantaJIm heard about that not all that after when it came out.

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wooden Carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014

Phantacea Publications logo utilizing a Sun-Moon wood carving spotted and shot by Jim McPherson, 2014; taken to represent the Dual Entities during happy times

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D-Brig gets five stars and an asterisk on Goodreads

Phantacea  Revisited 1:  The Damnation Brigade (Phantacea Revisited, #1)Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade by Jim McPherson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Damnation Brigade is the first Phantacea Revisited graphic novel.

The cover is by Ian Bateson, who also contributed a good percentage of the interior illustrations. Until now Ian’s Damnation Island sequence has never seen print.

Flyer for Phantacea books, 2012

Giveaway flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2012; artwork by Ian Bateson for Phantacea Phase 1 #1, 1986, derived from Dave Sim for Phantacea One, 1977

Of additional interest to aficionados of independent comic books, Dave Sim drew most of the Launching of the Cosmic Express sequence shortly before he began Cerebus the Aardvark in late ’77/early ’78.

Other featured illustrators include Gordon Parker, Verne Andrusiek (later Verne Andru), Carl Muecke, Vince Marchesano, Tim Hammell and George Freeman (Captain Canuck).

The book, whose dedicated webpage is here, begins with the launch sequence from Phantacea One (1977), as redone for Phantacea Phase One #1 (1987).

Flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2912

Giveaway flyer prepared by Jim McPherson, 2012; artwork by Ian Bateson for Phantacea Phase 1 #1, 1986, derived from Dave Sim for Phantacea One, 1977

It carries on with the titular struggles of an ultimately ill-named, 10-member band of supranormals from their re-embodiment on Damnation Island (the original version appeared in Phantacea Two, 1978), through their battles with the Byronic Nucleus, the Primary Apocalyptics and their allies, on both sides of the Whole Earth.

It ends with their inevitable reckoning as it first appeared in Phantacea Five (1980), which has been out-of-print since the very early 1980s.

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Jim McPherson adapted and expanded on the material presented in this ambitious graphic novel with 2009’s “The War of the Apocalyptics“, a full-length Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel that commences the ‘Launch 1980’ epic trilogy.

Front and back cover mockups for "Helios on the Moon", prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

Mockup sent to potential cover illustrators for “Helios on the Moon”, the next scheduled Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel

It also includes parts of the Centauri Island and UNES Liberty storylines that  continue (“Nuclear Dragons“, 2013) and will conclude (“Helios on the Moon”, 2014) the latest blockbuster fantasy from Phantacea Publications.

Overall this a delightful complement to the ongoing Phantacea Mythos catalogue of novels, mini-novels, comics and graphic novels; highly recommended.

BTW, it gets an asterisk because Jim McPherson, the creator/writer of the Phantacea Mythos, wrote the review.

View all my reviews

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Kitty Clsym hits Goodreads

Cataclysm Catalyst (Phantacea Revisited 2)Cataclysm Catalyst by Jim McPherson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“Cataclysm Catalyst” collects the entire Soldier’s Saga storyline, which began in Phantacea Two (1978) and concluded in Phantacea Six (1980). Most of the artwork in this sequence was by Verne Andrusiek (later Verne Andru). Last year (2013) Verne redid and completely coloured a black and white drawing of a proposed cover for an issue of Phantacea Phase One specifically for this publication. It’s quite splendid.

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of "Cataclysm Catalyst",  the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Flyer prepared for April 2014 launch of “Cataclysm Catalyst”, the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Much of the Soldier’s Saga formed the basis for Jim McPherson’s “Goddess Gambit“, a full-length Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel released in 2012 that concluded the epic “Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories” fantasy trilogy. The graphic novel also includes parts of the Centauri Island storyline that Jim McPherson novelized for his full-length 2013 Phantacea Mythos mosaic novel entitled “Nuclear Dragons“.

Advertisement appearing the convention brochure for APE - Alternative Press Expo, features b/w versions of front covers for Nuclear Dragons and the Damnation Brigade graphic novel

Advertisement appearing in the convention brochure for APE – Alternative Press Expo in October 2013. It features b/w versions of front covers for Nuclear Dragons and the Damnation Brigade graphic novel. Covers artwork for both publications by Ian Bateson; text by Jim McPherson

Of particular interest to Indy comics collectors in general and Phantacea aficionados in particular are the final six pages of the graphic novel. They were done by Phantacea stalwart Ian Bateson in 1980 for inclusion in Phantacea Seven, which was never published. Digitally re-lettered by Jim McPherson in the past year, this is the first time they have seen print. Also included is a reprint of “Tail Teller”, a short piece drawn by Ian Fry in the mid-1980s for the Phantacea Phase One project.

Page by page list of illustrators whose work appears in the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Page by page list of illustrators whose work appears in the second Phantacea Revisited graphic novel

Overall this a highly pleasing addition to the ongoing Phantacea Mythos catalogue of novels, mini-novels, comics and graphic novels; highly recommended.

A partial list of excerpts from the graphic novel can be found by clicking here.

View all my reviews

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Two out of Three Recommendations ain’t awful

This just in from CM: CANADIAN REVIEW OF MATERIALS:

Ian Bateson's full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

Ian Bateson’s full colour, wraparound cover for The War of the Apocalyptics, 2009

This review-recommendation written by Ronald Hore re “The War of the Apocalyptics”:

“The main difficulties I found were that … the story appears to take for granted some knowledge of what has gone on before. There are an almost bewildering number of characters who pop into the story without any background and constant references to past occurrences. There are also several named events or words used that form part of the narrative but do not immediately bring to mind what is being talked about. Much of the tale is told in the form of streams of dialogue between the characters. It might have helped somewhat to have a detailed character reference bio provided at the end along with a glossary of the more uncommon words and phrases.”

Might I humbly recommend use of the Phantacea-peculiar Search Engine atop either the Phantacea Publications webpage or pH-Webworld as a backup plan to even more pages in a novel? There are also lynx to Phantacea-peculiar Glossary items here.

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This review-recommendation written by Ronald Hore re “The Damnation Brigade” graphic novel:

Covers for Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade

Graphic novel compiles the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from pH 1-5 as well as pHz1 #s 1 & 2; for more on the Phantacea comics hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo

    “The artwork is generally quite good. The problem lies with the details of the story being told.

     “The arc of the story covers the battle between various superhumans (supras or supranormals) known as the Damnation Brigade and devils described on the back cover as “originally extraterrestrial Shining Ones.” 

     “Perhaps because this graphic novel is a collection of comic book sequences from previously published works, the material we have here appears to be lacking in continuity and detail. It is very difficult to follow. The author obviously knows his story and the universe where it is set, in great depth, but the reader is faced with a number of characters and situations where the background appears to be lacking. This makes for a very slow read as you must pause to try and figure out what is going on and how it connects to what was read previously.”

And this is a recommendation? Yep.

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Front and Back Covers for "Nuclear Dragons"; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

Front and Back Covers for “Nuclear Dragons”; artwork by Ian Bateson, 1980/2013; text by Jim McPherson

As for what he has to say about “Nuclear Dragons“, that’s here.

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SFC chimes in on D-Brig

This just in. (Just got permission to print it as is as well):

Covers for Phantacea Revisited 1: The Damnation Brigade

Graphic novel compiles the complete Damnation Brigade story sequence from pH 1-5 as well as pHz1 #s 1 & 2; for more on the Phantacea comics hit here: http://www.phantacea.com/one2six1.htm#logo

Subject: Re: SFCrowsnest ignores the weather when there’s February reviews to announce

Here’s the review we’re running on the SFCrowsnest.org.uk website this month.
Actually, the way the new website links in to Facebook and Twitter, I now have to put them in over a longer period, so it actually starts about the middle of the month. If you want to know precisely when, hook into our newsletter which gets triggered every time there is something new on the site.

Many thanks
Geoff Willmetts
editor: SFCrowsnest.co.uk

covers for Damnation Brigade graphic novel

Front and back covers for the upcoming Damnation Brigade graphic novel; artwork by Ian Bateson, 2012; touch-up by Chris Chuckry, 2012; prepared by Jim McPherson, 2013

The Damnation Brigade by Jim McPherson & various artists
(pub: Phantacea Publications. 116 pages graphic novel paperback. Price: $15.00 (US). ISBN: 978-0-98786-834-3)
check out website: www.phantacea.com
Tired of the same old tights and capes in your comicbooks? Looking to get your teeth into a series that is a bit different? Then ‘The Damnation Brigade’ might be the book for you.
Spanning issues one to five of the ‘Phantacea’ series that were initially published in the late seventies and early eighties, this collection deals with the adventures of the eponymous group. Starting out as an Avengers-type group who fought the Nazis in the Second World War, they were betrayed by the very people they had sworn to protect and decided to exile themselves rather than fight back.
The group is awoken during a battle between the Whirling Dervish Vayu Maelstrom and some of the Deadly Devas. Back in corporeal form after 25 years, the group seeks to do what they do best, fight evil, no matter what form it comes in.
The story is written by Jim McPherson, who created the ‘Phantacea’ universe, blending ‘Eagle’ comic-style pacing and words with some godly notions. There’s quite a bit going on in this book and simply skimming the pages just won’t do. Characters are introduced early on with already determined histories that don’t forgive anyone who isn’t giving it full attention. For anyone willing to give this collection a go, I personally would suggest a couple of reads to take in everything that happens. Although I would question if today’s reader has the patience to do that.
The origin story of the Damnation Brigade group does give the book a nice grounding and the reader finds themselves seeing through the three eyes of Maelstrom as he first meets the group, which certainly helped me enjoy and accept the character more. McPherson works with around eight different artists across the 116 pages of the volume, mostly Ian Bateson, who is a regular contributor to the series. Bateson has some interesting illustration styles that are a little different on every page he works on that challenge more later on, as if he gains in confidence as the book progresses. Other noteworthy artists included in this volume are Verne Andrusiek and Vincent Marchesano who offer up some crisp seventies-style comic art as part of their contribution.
This collection is certainly very different to most graphic novels out there and while the years may not have been kind to it, it’s worth a read to at least try something new.
Aidan Fortune

Tad disappointed Aidan felt need to add this at the end: “the years may not have been kind to it”,

Also wondered about this statement(s): “Although I would question if today’s reader has the patience to … [give this collection a] couple of reads to take in everything that happens.’

Guess he knows something I don’t about today’s readers. I used to read my comics two or three times back in the day.

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Janna Fangfingers — Amazing!

That it is. And, no, while he has been known to make things up, notably the Phantacea Mythos itself, Jim McPherson did not make this up.

Claire Nash did, on SF Reader (http://sfreader.com/read_review.asp?t=Janna+Fangfingers-by+Jim+McPherson&book=1557). Not all that long ago either (August 2013), considering it’s been out since 2011

Front cover for Janna Fangfingers, collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2010/11

Front cover for Janna Fangfingers, collage prepared by Jim McPherson, 2010/11

As for the “Amazing” bit, here’s a quote:

“The story appears at first to be hard to comprehend with a vast store of Phantacea jargon and complicated characters that often have multiple names. McPherson does well to remedy this disposition, however, with an in-depth character list and prologue for the reader to reference.

“It took this writer a while to get into the book without reading the character list, but once I understood it, the book was AMAZING! A definite recommendation for those with large imaginations …”

SF Reader also got copies of “Feeling Theocidal” and “Goddess Gambit“. No sign of any reviews but shall put up lynx, good, bad or indifferent, whenever discovered.

Just in case you wondering which is which, here’s a quick reminder of what all the fuss is about:

Janna Fangfingers

Set in the Years of the Dome 5476 to 5495 – but narrated in 5980 YD – Fangers is the third and final mini-novel comprising “The 1000 Days of Disbelief“, Book Two of ‘The Thrice-Cursed Godly Glories’ trilogy.

As told by the Legendarian, Jordan ‘Q for Quill’ Tethys, the day before the scheduled launching of the Cosmic Express from the Outer Earth’s Centauri Island, it details the truly horrifying consequences of the thereafter demonized Trigregos Titaness playing a Trigregos Gambit.

Wittingly or unwittingly, she sets in motion circumstances that so imperil the Hidden Continent of Sedon’s Head the Genesea (perhaps better known as the Great Flood of Genesis) could finally overwhelm it — nearly 5,500 years belatedly.

Her actions, and those of her husband and their terrible twins, dauntless deviants the three of them, result in not just the 1000 Days of Disbelief themselves but in All-Death Day itself. In many respects because of them, more Dead Things are marching against the Living than there are beings breathing, let alone fighting back.

It being his Age, resolving such a cataclysmic turn of events should properly fall to Thrygragos Everyman and his three Unities (the incomparable Harmony, Thunder and Lightning Lord Order and Uncle Abe Chaos).

After all, they thwarted threats to the Inner Earth posed by the Death’s Head Hellion in 4825 YD and, much later on, contagion collectors subordinate to Quoits Tethys (the Titaness’s Granny Jordy) and her lieutenants, Tomcat Taddletail and Herta Heartthrob, among others.

Maybe they would have, too. Except, what’s left of them after Harmony’s Feast Day of 5492 are driving the debacle.

And her extraordinary daughter, Janna already Fangfingers, is riding the wave of her mother’s making both then, in the Dome’s 55th Century, and now, in its 60th.

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Note: Being part of “The Thousand Days of Disbelief”, Fangers doesn’t have it’s own web page. Here‘s another even briefer blurb on the mini-novel. Finally, here’s a link to the (rather extensive) Prologue and Character Companion referred to in the review.

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Review of … call it a notice instead

Another extract from the archives. This fellow didn’t say what he thought of Goddess Gambit so much as what it was about.

Don’t think it’s appeared anywhere else so here goes, with lynx …

Gambit P-card

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Stevo’s Monthly Picks (Read-Only Folder) –  August Book Recommendations

(Stevo’s Book Reviews on the Internet: http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/main.asp?webtag=stevo1&msg=170.1&gid=148890425

Goddess Gambit by Jim McPherson (creator/writer) and Verne Andru (cover artist) Phantacea Publications, $25.00 –

In addition to concluding the Glories trilogy, Gambit picks up from where Janna Fangfingers left off. As such, it eventually carries on the Launch 1980 story cycle that began in 2009 with The War of the Apocalyptics.

Starting at the end of November 1980 (Maruta 5980 Year of the Dome), its ensemble cast includes many characters new to Phantacea Publications, though not to the Phantacea Mythos.

Among them are the fabulous, if fearsome, Fisherwoman (Scylla Nereid, now over 60 but as formidable as ever), the Hellions’ late 60th Century Morrigan (Superior Sarpedon), her husband and fellow Summoning Child Demios (once codenamed the Ace of Spades) and her year-older brother, the Master of Weir since 5950 (Saladin Devason).

Welcome back the Legendarian (Jordan ‘Q for Quill’ Tethys), Bodiless Byron’s Firstborn Silverclouds (Savage Storm and Lunar Uma), the Thanatoid Death Gods of Lathakra (King Cold and the Scarlet Empress) and a certain next-to-never-remembered smiling fiend (who may or may not yet prove to be the Moloch Sedon slumming).

Why are earthborn demons fighting against the Living and why are Hellion Witches fighting against demons? Aren’t they supposed to be allies? They were in Feel Theo, which took place on Mithramas Day 4376, and still were throughout the seven hundred or so years (4824-5495 YD) covered during 1000-Daze — what’s changed?

Who is Freespirit Nihila? To her exceedingly short-lived regret, didn’t Herta Heartthrob encounter someone very similar, perhaps even identical, to her in Contagion, circa 5476?

Did any members of the Damnation Brigade survive the War of the Apocalyptics? For that matter, did any of the Apocalyptics?  No matter … If they’re alive and dare trifle with them, Nergal Vetala, the Blood Queen of Hadd, and her soldier, her champion, the Trigregos Titan, whoever he is, will happily kill them.They’ll kill anyone who seeks to play let alone win a Trigregos Gambit at their expense.

Kill them then command their corpses to rise up and kill the more!

 

E-book cover for Goddess Gambit, artwork by Verne Andru

E-book cover for “Goddess Gambit” — ISBN 978-0-9878683-3-6

 

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Found but not Forgotten

From the archives. Don’t know about Bible-thumping background but it’s pretty clear the writer of this disappointing review of the first Phantacea Mythos graphic novel just doesn’t get it.

Still, in the spirit of any publicity is good publicity, have a boo and a comment, if you’re registered.

Forever & Forty Days by Jim McPherson and Ian Fry

01/07/2012. Contributed by Aidan Fortune

author pic

pub: Phantacea Mythos. 84 page softcover graphic novel. Price: $ 9.95 (US), $11.95 (CAN). ISBN: 978-0-97813-423-5.

check out website: www.phantacea.com

Initially released in 1990, this collection covers the genesis of his Phantacea gods in Jim McPherson’s mythological series.

In the sixties, acting as a backlash against the bible-thumping upbringing, McPherson creates a ‘new’ mythology loosely based on characters and events from the Old Testament. It lay unpublished in his basement for years until he decided to distribute it himself.

This book was supposed to act as a foundation for the ‘Phantacea’ series, to help readers get a better understanding of what McPherson was trying to achieve. However, I shudder to think what the rest of the series is like if this is the case. There is more to be gleaned from the author’s foreword about the Phantacea universe than the following eighty pages.

It’s all bit disjointed, flitting all over time and space with The Devil being the only constant character. Ironic that he should be the one reassuring element of the collection.

I found it difficult to read the text for the first few pages, as the font was too tight, making it hard on the eyes. In fairness, it improves after the first ten pages or so but someone new to the Phantacea universe may not be so willing to persevere with it.

Confusion and migraine-inducing text aside, the book has some merits. The art, while a bit sketchy at times, has a nice look to it and conveys a mythological atmosphere, plus the dialogue is wonderfully ridiculous with fun narrative text boxes to hammer home the plot points at various interludes.

Ultimately, while I didn’t enjoy ‘Forever & Forty Days’, I’m actually more annoyed at myself for not doing so. What McPherson created in ‘Phantacea’ was ambitious and bold and deserves more credit than it probably receives here. I would be interested in trying the rest of the series but I don’t think this particular collection is the best introduction to it and it may turn more people away than leave them clamouring for more.

My advice would be to try other books in the ‘Phantacea’ series before this one and see if it’s right for you.

Aidan Fortune

As noted above, not sure about this review. So, in an effort to slightly clear the air, as taken from the Phantacea Publications website, here‘s what the graphic novel’s all about:

Forever & 40 Days - the Genesis of PHANTACEA

The gods and goddesses, the demons and monsters, of ancient mythologies have been trivialized, their worship proscribed and the entities themselves mostly confined to another realm.

Culminating in the Genesea (aka the Great Flood of Genesis), the graphic novel, "Forever & 40 Days - the Genesis of PHANTACEA", recounts many of the challenges these then only eventual gods and goddesses faced prior to their apotheosis. Of them, about half take place pre-Earth.

Nothing less than the PHANTACEA version of the origin of the Devil himself highlights this 1990 collection of short featurettes drawn by Ian Fry and initially intended for the phantacea Phase One project.

(Secular Note 1: According to some faiths, fallen angels became devils. They had to have fallen from somewhere, which in Phantacea Mythos books makes them extraterrestrials. Are the heavens not outer space? Of course they are.)

(Pun Alert: As for why Hor looks Japanese on the cover of pH-4Ever, when Jim McPherson first heard about Japan’s famous Noh theatre as a kid, he decided it had to be named after Noah. The notion never left whatever else is left of his peabrain.)

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Plenty more here

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Disciples of the unusual and fantastical

Have a boo here for a comment on / sort of review of “Goddess Gambit“. Then have look at whatever else Mercury Sam has to say: http://blondahl.blogspot.ca/2013/08/gg.html

5 collages prepared for the Goddess Gambit web page

A variety of collages prepared by Jim McPherson for the Goddess Gambit web page

Should note that a short synopsis of the novel is here: http://www.phantacea.com/#gambit_teaser whereas a longer one is here: http://www.phantacea.com/gambit_page.htm#30SecondSyn

Just in case you’re not feeling clicky, here’s a reminder of what it’s about:

  Goddess Gambit

 

Nergal Vetala is the Blood Queen of Hadd, the Land of the Ambulatory Dead. She is the lone devic vampire. For 35 years she has been unable to prevent the encroachment of the Living on her realm. Then her soldier falls out of the sky and she’s back in the pink again — as in arterial.

 

The Trigregos Talismans are a curved blade, a mirror that can be used as a shield and a bloodstone tiara. The Head’s anti-devazur movements cherish them as the Three Sacred Objects because they reputedly can be used to kill devils. For exactly the same reason devils call them the Three Accursed Objects.

 

They’ve been separated for hundreds of years, since roughly two years prior to All-Death Day in 5494 YD. However, they’re composed of Brainrock-Gypsium, the remnants of the Big Bang’s Primordial Godhead. Due to the PHANTACEA-fact this Godstuff is both transmutable and teleportive, if you found one it should lead you between-space to the other two.

 

At stake is mastery of devils, the gods and goddesses of not just the Living. At stake as well, potentially, should be mastery over the entire Headworld. Not surprisingly, when one of them finally shows up again, it suddenly seems like nearly everyone wants all three of them.

 

Too bad, as Nergal Vetala should know better than most, everyone who ever played a Trigregos Gambit in the past has lost.

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As always, good reading.

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